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  1. The Body.Kevin Aho - 2013 - In Francois Raffoul & Eric S. Nelson (eds.), The Bloomsbury Companion to Heidegger. Bloomsbury Academic. pp. 269.
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  2. Bodily Natures: Science, Environment, and the Material Self.Stacy Alaimo (ed.) - 2010 - Indiana University Press.
    How do we understand the agency and significance of material forces and their interface with human bodies? What does it mean to be human in these times, with bodies that are inextricably interconnected with our physical world? Bodily Natures considers these questions by grappling with powerful and pervasive material forces and their increasingly harmful effects on the human body. Drawing on feminist theory, environmental studies, and the sciences, Stacy Alaimo focuses on trans-corporeality, or movement across bodies and nature, which has (...)
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  3. On What It is Like to Be a Man.Virgil C. Aldrich - 1973 - Inquiry 16 (1-4):355 – 366.
    The human body is ?transmogrified? (caricatured) under physicalistic descriptions of it. These imply that it is a contingent fact that rational beings such as human persons have the sort of bodies they do have. (Or, that, say, baboons are not rational creatures.) The human body is ?transfigured? under a description that makes it necessary to the performance of rational functions, including speaking a language. Any view of the matter that excludes this notion, either by reduction to the physicalist treatment or (...)
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  4. Representations, Symbols and Embodiment.Dr Michael L. Anderson - 2003 - Philosophical Explorations.
    Response to "Embodied artificial intelligence", a commentary by Ron Chrisley.
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  5. Pain, Private Language and the Mind-Body Problem.James Anderson - unknown
  6. Actions and the Body.Thomas Annese - 1967 - Dissertation, University of California, Los Angeles
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  7. On Sensations of Position.G. E. M. Anscombe - 1962 - Analysis 22 (3):55 - 58.
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  8. Making the Body Heard the Body's Way Toward Existence.David Appelbaum - 1988
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  9. The Interpenetrating Reality Bringing the Body to Touch.David Applebaum - 1988
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  10. Explaining the Privacy of Afterimages and Pains.Edward W. Averill - 1978 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 38 (March):299-314.
  11. Embodied in a Metaverse: Anatomia and Body Parts.Elif Ayiter - 2010 - Technoetic Arts 8 (2):181-188.
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  12. Schmutz Èuber Abfèalle in der Zivilisation Europas.Horst Baier - 1991
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  13. Pains.Kurt Baier - 1962 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 40 (1):1-23.
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  14. With My Body.John Bate - 1988 - New Blackfriars 69 (822):529-529.
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  15. Is Consciousness Embodied?James Beebe - manuscript
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  16. Historical Actuality and Bodily Experience.Nicholas Beets - 1966 - Humanitas 2:15-28.
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  17. This Isn't My Body.Ophelia Benson - 2005 - The Philosophers' Magazine 32:15-17.
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  18. The Experience of Agency in the Feeling of Being Suicidal.Outi Benson - 2013 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    Based on a qualitative study with 124 participants we explore what is in ordinary language referred to as 'suicidal feelings'. We identify four interrelated aspects of this experience, which together suggest that 'suicidal feelings' is in fact a 'feeling of being suicidal', an existential feeling. Although each experience is unique in its presentation, it is also the case that people who are suicidal tend to experience a combination of the following: 1) loss of consistency and/ or coherence in their sense (...)
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  19. The Philosophy of the Body.Christer Bjurvill - 1991 - Analecta Husserliana 35:317.
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  20. The Body Critical Concepts in Sociology.Andrew Blaikie - 2004
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  21. Sensuri Ale Corpului: Actele Celui de-Al 2-Lea Colocviu Al Centrului de Hermeneutică, Fenomologie Și Filosofie Practică, 28-29 Octombrie 2010, Universitatea "A. [REVIEW]George Bondor (ed.) - 2011 - Editura Universității "Alexandru Ioan Cuza".
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  22. Cinema, The Body And Embodiment.Patrícia Silveirinha Castello Branco - 2012 - Cinema 3:1-9.
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  23. Book Review Implications of Embodiment. [REVIEW]Ewald Brunner - 2011 - Mind and Matter 9 (2):211-215.
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  24. Embodiment, Muscle Sense, and Memory for Speech.Hugh W. Buckingham - 1998 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 21 (4):515-515.
    MacNeilage's target article develops a theory for the evolution of human speech articulation along the lines of “slot- filler” structure. His content/frame schema commits him to the tenets of embodiment, muscle sense, and a memory for speech. My commentary ties these aspects together in their historical and current perspective.
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  25. Are We Our Brains?Stephen Burwood - 2009 - Philosophical Investigations 32 (2):113-133.
    My aim in this paper is to destabilise the brain-is-self thesis, something that is now regarded in some quarters as philosophical commonsense. My contention is that it is the epithelial body that enters into the formation of our sense of self and that largely bears the burden of personal identity as well as playing the key role in grounding our psychological ascriptions. Lacking any sensorimotor or social presence of its own, the brain by itself cannot "underlie" selfhood, but only as (...)
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  26. Bodily Doubt.Havi Carel - 2013 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    In this paper I explore the tacit underlying sense of bodily certainty that characterizes normal everyday embodied experience. I then propose illness as one instance in which this certainty breaks down and is replaced by bodily doubt. I characterize bodily doubt as radically modifying our experience in three ways: loss of continuity, loss of transparency, and loss of faith in one's body. I then discuss the philosophical insights that arise from the experience of bodily doubt. The paper uses a Humean (...)
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  27. Different Bodies.Lisa Marie Cassidy - 2003 - Dissertation, The University of Connecticut
    This dissertation explores bodily responsibility, which I define as responsibility for the properties and appearances of one's body. The overall objective of the work is to present bodily responsibility as an important ethical topic. In doing so I answer two key questions: Do we have responsibility for the bodily properties we choose? Do we choose the bodily properties we for which are responsible? I begin by comparing four bodily responsibility accounts from the history of philosophy . The following chapters give (...)
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  28. Sensations and Phenomenology.Harmon M. Chapman - 1966 - Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
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  29. Ownership and the Body.Jennifer Church - 1997 - In Diana T. Meyers (ed.), Feminists Rethink the Self. Westview Press.
  30. Negotiating Embodiment: A Reply to Selinger and Engström.Andy Clark - 2007 - Janus Head 9 (2).
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  31. Chapter 9. The State: The Embodiment of the Third Self.Paul Cobben - 2009 - In The Nature of the Self: Recognition in the Form of Right and Morality. Walter de Gruyter.
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  32. A Body Worth Defending. Opening Up a Few Concepts: Introductory Ruminations.Ed Cohen - 2012 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (1).
    The following text is an introduction to Ed Cohen’s book A Body Worth Defending: Immunity, Biopolitics and the Apotheosis of the Modern Body. Author investigates the way in which immunology influences the perception of both the human body, and political entities, demonstrating that contemporary conceptualizations of these phenomena exist in a double bind. The historical framework Cohen applies allows for tracing the history of the metaphor of immunity in politics and medicine.
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  33. "Self-Consciousness and the Body": Commentary.Jonathan Cole - 2000 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 7 (6):50-52.
    Traditionally, what we are conscious of in self-consciousness is something non-corporeal. But anti-Cartesian philosophers argue that the self is as much corporeal as it is mental. Because we have the sense of proprioception, a kind of body awareness, we are immediately aware of ourselves as bodies in physical space. In this debate the case histories of patients who have lost their sense of proprioception are clearly relevant. These patients do retain an awareness of themselves as corporeal beings, although they hardly (...)
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  34. On 'Being Faceless': Selfhood and Facial Embodiment.Jonathan Cole - 1997 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 4 (5-6):5-6.
    For most people a sense of self includes an embodied component: when describing our selves we describe those aspects of our physical bodies which can be easily codified: height, hair colour, sex, eye colour. Even when we consider ourselves we tend not to consider our intellectual cognitive characteristics but our describable anatomy. Wittgenstein's dictum, ‘the human body is the best picture of the human soul’, is relevant here but I would like to go further: the body-part we feel most embodied (...)
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  35. Deborah S. Wilson and Christine Moneera Laennec, Bodily Discursions: Genders, Representations, Technologies (1997).M. Connelly - 2001 - American Journal of Semiotics 17 (4):367-369.
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  36. Bodily Discursions.Maureen Connolly - 2001 - American Journal of Semiotics 17 (4):367-369.
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  37. Seeing with the Hands.Sinigaglia Corrado - 2012 - In Paglieri F. (ed.), Consciousness in interaction: the role of the natural and social context in shaping consciousness. John Benjamins.
    When witnessing someone else's action people often take advantage of the same motor cognition that is crucial to successfully perform that action themselves. But how deeply is motor cognition involved in understanding another's action? Can it be selectively modulated by either the agent's or the witness's being actually in the position to act? If this is the case, what does such modulation imply for one's making sense of others? The paper aims to tackle these issues by introducing and discussing a (...)
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  38. Philosophy of Body.Joyce Corriero & Carolyn Q. Hickey - 2003 - Questions: Philosophy for Young People 3:11-12.
    Dialogial inquiry is proposed to second grade students in this project, and dialogue, that examines the philosophy of the human body.
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  39. Embodiment and Experience: The Existential Ground of Culture and Self.Thomas J. Csordas (ed.) - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    Students of culture have been increasingly concerned with the ways in which cultural values are 'inscribed' on the body. These essays go beyond this passive construal of the body to a position in which embodiment is understood as the existential condition of cultural life. From this standpoint embodiment is reducible neither to representations of the body, to the body as an objectification of power, to the body as a physical entity or biological organism, nor to the body as an inalienable (...)
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  40. This My Body.Tom Cullinan - 1987 - New Blackfriars 68 (811):567-571.
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  41. 8. Body.Edwin M. Curley - 1978 - In Descartes Against the Skeptics. Harvard University Press. pp. 207-234.
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  42. 11'My Body is My Art'.Kathy Davis - 1997 - In Embodied Practices: Feminist Perspectives on the Body. Sage Publications. pp. 1--168.
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  43. Technology and the Myth of 'Natural Man'.Helena De Preester - 2012 - Foundations of Science 17 (4):385-390.
    The main suggestions and objections raised by Don Ihde and Charles Lenay to my ‘Technology and the body: the (im)possibilities of re-embodiment’ are summarized and discussed. On the one hand, I agree that we should pay more attention to whole body experience and to further resisting Cartesian assumptions in the field of cognitive neuroscience and philosophy of cognition. On the other hand, I explain that my account in no way presupposes the myth of ‘natural man’ or of a natural, delineated (...)
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  44. To Perform the Layered Body—a Short Exploration of the Body in Performance.Helena De Preester - 2007 - Janus Head: Journal of Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature, Continental Philosophy, Phenomenological Psychology, and the Arts 9 (2):349-383.
    The aim of this article is to focus on the body as instrument or means in performance-art. Since the body is no monolithic given, the body is approached in terms of its constitutive layers, and this may enable us to conceive of the mechanisms that make performances possible and operational, i.e. those bodily mechanisms that are implicitly or explicitly controlled or manipulated in performance. Of course, the exploitation of these bodily layers is not solely responsible for the generation of meaning (...)
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  45. Pain and Bodily Care: Whose Body Matters?Frederique de Vignemont - 2015 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 93 (3):542-560.
    Pain is unpleasant. It is something that one avoids as much as possible. One might then claim that one wants to avoid pain because one cares about one's body. On this view, individuals who do not experience pain as unpleasant and to be avoided, like patients with pain asymbolia, do not care about their body. This conception of pain has been recently defended by Bain [2014] and Klein [forthcoming]. In their view, one needs to care about one's body for pain (...)
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  46. Widening the Body to Rubber Hands and Tools: What's the Difference?Frédérique De Vignemont - unknown
    The brain represents the body in different ways for different purposes. Several concepts and even more numerous labels have historically been proposed to define these representations in operational terms. Recent evidence of embodiment of external objects has added complexity to an already quite intricate picture. In particular, because of their perceptual and motor effects, both rubber hands and tools can be conceived as embodied, that is, represented in the brain as if they were parts of one's own body. But are (...)
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  47. How Many Representations of the Body?Frédérique de Vignemont - 2007 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 30 (2):204-205.
    Based on functional differences, Dijkerman and de Haan emphasize the duality of somatosensory processing and therefore of body representations. But how many body representations do we really have? And what kind of criterion can we use to distinguish them? I review here the empirical and conceptual difficulties in drawing such distinctions and the way to progress.
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  48. The Marginal Body.Frédérique De Vignemont - unknown
    According to Gurwitsch, the body is at least at the margin of consciousness. If all components of the field of consciousness were experienced as equally salient, we would indeed not be able to think and behave appropriately. Though the body may become the focus of our conscious field when we are introspectively aware of it, it remains most of the time only at the background of consciousness. However, we may wonder if bodily states do really need to be conscious, even (...)
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  49. Ghost Buster: The Reality of One's Own Body.Frédérique De Vignemont - unknown
    What are the epistemic bases of the knowledge of the reality of our own body? Proprioception plays a primordial role in body representation and more particularly at the level of body schema. Without proprioception people can feel amputated and the mislocalization of proprioceptive information through the remapping of the Penfield Homonculus induces illusions of phantom limbs, illusions that contradictory visual feedback cannot erase. However, it turns out that it is not as simple as that and that vision also intervenes in (...)
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  50. If a Body Meet a Body.Michael Della Rocca - 1999 - In Gennaro Rocco & Huenemann Charles (eds.), New Essays on the Rationalists. Oxford University Press.
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