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  1. What Is It Like To Become a Bat? Heterogeneities in an Age of Extinction.Stephanie Erev - 2018 - Environmental Humanities 1 (10):129-149.
    In his celebrated 1974 essay “What Is It Like to Be a Bat?,” Thomas Nagel stages a human-bat encounter to illustrate and support his claim that “subjective experience” is irreducible to “objective fact”: because Nagel cannot experience the world as a bat does, he will never know what it is like to be one. In Nagel’s account, heterogeneity is figured negatively—as a failure or lack of resemblance—and functions to constrain his knowledge of bats. Today, as white-nose syndrome threatens bat populations (...)
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  2. Sensorimotor Expectations and the Visual Field.Dan Cavedon-Taylor - forthcoming - Synthese:1-16.
    Sensorimotor expectations concern how visual experience covaries with bodily movement. Sensorimotor theorists argue from such expectations to the conclusion that the phenomenology of vision is constitutively embodied: objects within the visual field are experienced as 3-D because sensorimotor expectations partially constitute our experience of such objects. Critics argue that there are two ways to block the above inference: to explain how we visually experience objects as 3-D, one may appeal to such non-bodily factors as expectations about movements of objects, not (...)
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  3. Our Body Is the Measure: Malebranche and the Body-Relativity of Sensory Perception.Colin Chamberlain - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy.
    Malebranche holds that sensory experience represents the world from the body’s point of view. I argue that Malebranche gives a systematic analysis of this bodily perspective in terms of the claim that the five familiar external senses and bodily awareness represent nothing but relations to the body.
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  4. The Bodily Other and Everyday Experience of the Lived Urban World.Oren Bader & Aya Peri Bader - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 3 (2):93-109.
    This article explores the relationship between the bodily presence of other humans in the lived urban world and the experience of everyday architecture. We suggest, from the perspectives of phenomenology and architecture, that being in the company of others changes the way the built environment appears to subjects, and that this enables us to perform simple daily tasks while still attending to the built environment. Our analysis shows that in mundane urban settings attending to the environment involves a unique attentional (...)
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  5. A Bodily Sense of Self in Descartes and Malebranche.Colin Chamberlain - 2016 - In Jari Kaukua & Tomas Ekenberg (eds.), Subjectivity and Selfhood in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Basel, Switzerland: pp. 219-234.
    Although Descartes and Malebranche argue that we are immaterial thinking things, they also maintain that each of us stands in a unique experiential relation to a single human body, such that we feel as though this body belongs to us and is part of ourselves. This paper examines Descartes’s and Malebranche’s accounts of this feeling. They hold that our experience of being embodied is grounded in affective bodily sensations that feel good or bad: namely, sensations of pleasure and pain, hunger (...)
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  6. Fantom Ciała Jako Cielesna Samoświadomość.Przemysław Nowakowski - 2010 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 1 (1).
    According to Peter Halligan, […] it is important to consider that the experience of our body is largely the product of a continuously updated „phantom” generated by the brain.. Next, he adds: I will argue that the prevalent common sense assumption of phantom experience as pathological is wrongheaded and largely based on a long-standing and pernicious folk assumption that the physical body is necessary for experience of a body.. These two remarks can serve as a backdrop for a discussion of (...)
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  7. A Body Worth Defending. Opening Up a Few Concepts: Introductory Ruminations.Ed Cohen - 2012 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (1):65-96.
    The following text is an introduction to Ed Cohen’s book A Body Worth Defending: Immunity, Biopolitics and the Apotheosis of the Modern Body. Author investigates the way in which immunology influences the perception of both the human body, and political entities, demonstrating that contemporary conceptualizations of these phenomena exist in a double bind. The historical framework Cohen applies allows for tracing the history of the metaphor of immunity in politics and medicine.
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  8. Pain, Care, and the Body: A Response to de Vignemont.Colin Klein - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (3):588-593.
    Frédérique de Vignemont argues on the basis of several empirical counterexamples that Bain and Klein are wrong about the relationship between pain and bodily care. I argue that the force of the putative counterexamples is weak. Properly understood, the association between pain and care is preserved in a way that is consistent with both de Vignemont's own views and the empirical facts.
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  9. The Self in Neuroscience and Psychiatry.Helena De Preester - 2006 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):119-124.
  10. Emotional Experience: Affective Consciousness and its Role in Emotion Theory.Fabrice Teroni & Julien Deonna - forthcoming - In Uriah Kriegel (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Consciousness. New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
    This paper explores substantive accounts of emotional phenomenology so as to see whether it sheds light on key features of emotions. To this end, we focus on four features that can be introduced by way of an example. Say Sam is angry at Maria’s nasty remark. The first feature relates to the fact that anger is a negative emotion, by contrast with positive emotions such as joy and admiration (valence). The second feature is how anger differs from other emotions such (...)
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  11. From Epistemic Actions to Scientific Discourse: The Bridging Function of Gestures.Wolff-Michael Roth - 2003 - Pragmatics and Cognition 11 (1):141-170.
    The role of gestures in communication is still debated: Some claim that gestures are merely ancillary forms of expressions, whereas others suggest a central role of gestures in the development of language. In this article, I provide data in support of the overarching hypothesis that gestures have a transitional function between ergotic/epistemic movements of hands and symbolic expressions. The context for the study of these transitions is constituted by school science laboratory activities conducted by students who are also asked to (...)
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  12. On Sensations of Position.G. E. M. Anscombe - 1962 - Analysis 22 (3):55.
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  13. The Threefold Cord: Mind, Body, and World. [REVIEW]Katalin Farkas - 2003 - Mind 112 (448):786-789.
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  14. Bodily Discursions: Genders, Representations, Technologies. [REVIEW]Maureen Connolly - 2001 - American Journal of Semiotics 17 (4):367-369.
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  15. “My Body Survives by Uttering Itself”.Kari J. Winter - 1999 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 18 (3):53-62.
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  16. Chapter 9. The State: The Embodiment of the Third Self.Paul Cobben - 2009 - In The Nature of the Self: Recognition in the Form of Right and Morality. Walter de Gruyter.
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  17. Embodiment and Experience: The Existential Ground of Culture and Self.Thomas J. Csordas (ed.) - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    Students of culture have been increasingly concerned with the ways in which cultural values are 'inscribed' on the body. These essays go beyond this passive construal of the body to a position in which embodiment is understood as the existential condition of cultural life. From this standpoint embodiment is reducible neither to representations of the body, to the body as an objectification of power, to the body as a physical entity or biological organism, nor to the body as an inalienable (...)
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  18. Ghost Buster: The Reality of One's Own Body.Frédérique De Vignemont - unknown
    What are the epistemic bases of the knowledge of the reality of our own body? Proprioception plays a primordial role in body representation and more particularly at the level of body schema. Without proprioception people can feel amputated and the mislocalization of proprioceptive information through the remapping of the Penfield Homonculus induces illusions of phantom limbs, illusions that contradictory visual feedback cannot erase. However, it turns out that it is not as simple as that and that vision also intervenes in (...)
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  19. The Marginal Body.Frédérique De Vignemont - unknown
    According to Gurwitsch, the body is at least at the margin of consciousness. If all components of the field of consciousness were experienced as equally salient, we would indeed not be able to think and behave appropriately. Though the body may become the focus of our conscious field when we are introspectively aware of it, it remains most of the time only at the background of consciousness. However, we may wonder if bodily states do really need to be conscious, even (...)
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  20. Widening the Body to Rubber Hands and Tools: What's the Difference?Frédérique De Vignemont - unknown
    The brain represents the body in different ways for different purposes. Several concepts and even more numerous labels have historically been proposed to define these representations in operational terms. Recent evidence of embodiment of external objects has added complexity to an already quite intricate picture. In particular, because of their perceptual and motor effects, both rubber hands and tools can be conceived as embodied, that is, represented in the brain as if they were parts of one's own body. But are (...)
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  21. An Existential-Phenomenological Investigation of Women’s Experience of Becoming Less Obsessed with Their Bodily Appearance.Jennifer K. Kirby - 2016 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 16 (sup1):1-15.
    This study investigated women’s lived experience of becoming less obsessed with their bodily appearance. Written narrative accounts were collected from seven women co-participants and a phenomenological analysis of these descriptive protocols was then performed in order to reveal the prereflective structure of the focal phenomenon, seven essential constituents of which emerged. A major goal of this research was to contribute to the undernourished area of phenomenological research regarding the experience of body image.
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  22. With My Body.John Bate - 1988 - New Blackfriars 69 (822):529-529.
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  23. This My Body.Tom Cullinan - 1987 - New Blackfriars 68 (811):567-571.
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  24. III—The Embodiment of Mind or What Use is Having a Body?Jonathan Harrison - 1973 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 74 (1):35-55.
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  25. Differential Perceptions of Body Image and Body Weight Among Adults of Different Socioeconomic Status in a Sub-Urban Population.Fatai A. Maruf, Aderonke O. Akinpelu & Nwannedimma V. Udoji - 2014 - Journal of Biosocial Science 46 (3):279-293.
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  26. Embodiment and the Construction of Social Knowledge: Towards an Integration of Embodiment and Social Representations Theory.Cliodhna O'Connor - 2016 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 46 (4).
    Recent developments in the psychological and social sciences have seen a surge of attention to concepts of embodiment. The burgeoning field of embodied cognition, as well as the long-standing tradition of phenomenological philosophy, offer valuable insights for theorising how people come to understand the world around them. However, the implications of human embodiment have been largely neglected by one of the key frameworks for conceptualising the development of social knowledge: Social Representations Theory. This article seeks to spark a dialogue between (...)
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  27. Sensations and Kinaesthetic Knowledge.Merrill Ring - 1982 - Philosophy Research Archives 8:111-168.
    When Wittgenstein said psychology contains conceptual confusions and experimental results, one item he had in mind was the psycho-physiological theory of kinaesthesis, which offers an account of how we know limb movement and position. The aim of this essay is to develop and evaluate the objections to that theory which have been produced by Wittgenstein, Melden and Anscombe. That project involves specifying clearly what is involved in the theory, resolving various disagreements between the critics, showing the pattern of the objections, (...)
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  28. Plastic Body, Permanent Body: Czech Representations of Corporeality in the Early Twentieth Century.Charlotte Sleigh - 2009 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 40 (4):241-255.
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  29. It’s My Body and I’Ll Do What I Like With It.Anne Phillips - 2011 - Political Theory 39 (6):724-748.
    What, if any, is the problem with treating bodies as objects or property? Is there a defensible basis for seeing bodies as different from "other" material resources? Or is thinking the body special a kind of sentimentalism that blocks clear thinking about matters such as prostitution, surrogate motherhood, and the sale of spare kidneys? I argue that the language we use does matter, and that thinking of the body as property encourages a self/body dualism that obscures the power relations involved (...)
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  30. Body Consciousness: A Philosophy of Mindfulness and Somaesthetics.Richard Shusterman - 2008 - Cambridge University Press.
    Contemporary culture increasingly suffers from problems of attention, over-stimulation, and stress, and a variety of personal and social discontents generated by deceptive body images. This book argues that improved body consciousness can relieve these problems and enhance one's knowledge, performance, and pleasure. The body is our basic medium of perception and action, but focused attention to its feelings and movements has long been criticised as a damaging distraction that also ethically corrupts through self-absorption. In Body Consciousness, Richard Shusterman refutes such (...)
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  31. Body Aesthetics.Sherri Irvin (ed.) - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    The body is a rich object for aesthetic inquiry. We aesthetically assess both our own bodies and those of others, and our felt bodily experiences have aesthetic qualities. The body features centrally in aesthetic experiences of visual art, theatre, dance and sports. It is also deeply intertwined with one's identity and sense of self. Artistic and media representations shape how we see and engage with bodies, with consequences both personal and political. This volume contains sixteen original essays by contributors in (...)
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  32. Nietzsche on the Embodiment of Mind and Self.Mattia Riccardi - 2015 - In Bartholomew Ryan, Maria Joao Mayer Branco & João Constancio (eds.), Nietzsche and the Problem of Subjectivity. De Gruyter. pp. 533-549.
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  33. An Ethics of Embodiment: The Body as Object and Subject.Guy Widdershoven & Jenny Slatman - 2015 - In Darian Meacham (ed.), Medicine and Society, New Perspectives in Continental Philosophy. Springer Verlag.
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  34. Three. The Mirror and the Body: Internal Knowledge and External Embodiment.Donald J. Munro - 1988 - In Images of Human Nature: A Sung Portrait. Princeton University Press. pp. 75-111.
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  35. 8. Body.Edwin M. Curley - 1978 - In Descartes Against the Skeptics. Harvard University Press. pp. 207-234.
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  36. Pain, Private Language and the Mind-Body Problem.James Anderson - unknown
  37. The Role of Image Schemas and Superior Psychic Faculties in Zoosemiosis.José Manuel Ureña Gómez-Moreno - 2014 - Biosemiotics 7 (3):405-427.
    Image schemas are mental constructs central to human cognitive psychology. The neurobiological grounding of these structures has been suggested by experimental research both in non-human primates and lower animals . However, their applicability as concrete cognitive products has not been explored yet in zoosemiotics. This study shows that image schemas are highly instrumental to making sense of the impersonations of two animals featured in biology research studies and wildlife documentary films: the mimic octopus and the Gibb’s sea spider crab . (...)
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  38. Body and Will.Henry Maudsley - 1883
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  39. Making the Body Heard the Body's Way Toward Existence.David Appelbaum - 1988 - New York: Peter Lang.
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  40. The Interpenetrating Reality Bringing the Body to Touch.David Applebaum - 1988
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  41. The Body Critical Concepts in Sociology.Andrew Blaikie - 2004
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  42. Moulding Masculinities.Thomas Ervø Søen & Johansson - 2003
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  43. Sense-Making Bodies: Feminist Materiality and Phenomenology in Constructive Body Theologies.Heike Peckruhn - unknown
    Constructive body theology provides an ethical commitment to and a set of analytical principles for understanding bodily experience. If we insist upon the theological value of embodied experience, how can we give an adequate account of it? Are feminist appeals to the senses useful in developing theological truth claims based in embodied experiences? Feminist theologies which explicitly seek to overcome body/mind dualisms often reinscribe them when they neglect to attend to perception as a critical element of bodily experience. Phenomenological analyses (...)
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  44. The Living Embodiment Of The Nation. [REVIEW]Phillip Henderson - 1994 - Humanitas 7 (2):69-78.
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  45. Different Bodies.Lisa Marie Cassidy - 2003 - Dissertation, The University of Connecticut
    This dissertation explores bodily responsibility, which I define as responsibility for the properties and appearances of one's body. The overall objective of the work is to present bodily responsibility as an important ethical topic. In doing so I answer two key questions: Do we have responsibility for the bodily properties we choose? Do we choose the bodily properties we for which are responsible? I begin by comparing four bodily responsibility accounts from the history of philosophy . The following chapters give (...)
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  46. The Embodiment of Science. [REVIEW]T. Roberts - 2005 - Janus Head 8 (2).
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  47. Negotiating Embodiment: A Reply to Selinger and Engström.Andy Clark - 2007 - Janus Head 9 (2).
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  48. Situating Situatedness Through Æffect and the Architectural Body of Arakawa and Gins.Jondi Keane - 2007 - Janus Head 9 (2).
    This paper explores the situated body by briefly surveying the historical studies of effect and of affect which converge in current work on attention. This common approach to the situated body through attention prompted the coining of a more inclusive term, Æffect, to indicate the situated body’s mode of observation. Examples from the work of artist-turned-architects, Arakawa and Gins, will be discussed to show how architectural environments can act as heuristic tools that allow the situated body to research its own (...)
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  49. Body and Art. [REVIEW]Hiroe Nitta - 1999 - Bigaku 50 (1):72.
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  50. A Socio-Somatic Approach to Interpretation of the Body Through Sport Experience.Hyung-il Lee - 1998 - Dissertation, The Ohio State University
    Sport is based on the moving human body. Almost any cultural generalities regarding the body apply to our social-cultural attitudes towards sport as well. The body has been rediscovered as a subject in recent debates about its representation historically and in social-cultural theory . ;This paper applies principles of Somatics and Social Constructivism to an analysis of the sporting body in contemporary sport. The Somatic and Social Constructivist views have quite different understandings of the human body. Somatics focuses on the (...)
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1 — 50 / 599