This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:See also:

634 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 634
Material to categorize
  1. People Made of Glass: The Collapsing Temporalities of Chronic Conditions.Ida Vandsøe Madsen - 2021 - Anthropology of Consciousness 32 (1):7-32.
    An increasing number of people worldwide are living with chronic conditions that have an aspect of bodily fragility as part of the condition or as an effect of treatment. In this article, I explore the temporal experience of bodily fragility and the particularities of consciousness states among people with the chronic condition osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) in Denmark. My aim is threefold. First, my goal is to give an insight into life with OI, a rare and rarely studied condition. Second, I (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  2. Motricité, Physiology, and Modernity in Phenomenology of Perception.Mark Paterson - 2018 - In A. Mildenberg (ed.), Understanding Merleau-Ponty, Understanding Modernism. London: pp. 170--184.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. A Practice-Inspired Mindset for Researching the Psychophysiological and Medical Health Effects of Recreational Dance.Julia F. Christensen, Meghedi Vartanian, Luisa Sancho-Escanero, Shahrzad Khorsandi, S. H. N. Yazdi, Fahimeh Farahi, Khatereh Borhani & Antoni Gomila - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    “Dance” has been associated with many psychophysiological and medical health effects. However, varying definitions of what constitute “dance” have led to a rather heterogenous body of evidence about such potential effects, leaving the picture piecemeal at best. It remains unclear what exact parameters may be driving positive effects. We believe that this heterogeneity of evidence is partly due to a lack of a clear definition of dance for such empirical purposes. A differentiation is needed between the effects on the individual (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Menstrual Cycle, Psychological Responses, and Adherence to Physical Exercise: Viewpoint of a Possible Barrier.Raul Cosme Ramos Prado, Rodrigo Silveira, Marcus W. Kilpatrick, Flávio Oliveira Pires & Ricardo Yukio Asano - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
  5. Interoception and Empathy Impact Perspective Taking.Lukas Heydrich, Francesco Walker, Larissa Blättler, Bruno Herbelin, Olaf Blanke & Jane Elizabeth Aspell - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 11.
    Adopting the perspective of another person is an important aspect of social cognition and has been shown to depend on multisensory signals from one’s own body. Recent work suggests that interoceptive signals not only contribute to own-body perception and self-consciousness, but also to empathy. Here we investigated if social cognition – in particular adopting the perspective of another person – can be altered by a systematic manipulation of interoceptive cues and further, if this effect depends on empathic ability. The own-body (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Effort, Uncertainty, and the Sense of Agency.Oliver Lukitsch - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 11 (4):955-975.
    Orthodox neurocognitive accounts of the bodily sense of agency suggest that the experience of agency arises when action-effects are anticipated accurately. In this paper, I argue that while successful anticipation is crucial for the sense of agency, the role of unsuccessful prediction has been neglected, and that inefficacy and uncertainty are no less central to the sense of agency. I will argue that this is reflected in the phenomenology of agency, which can be characterized both as the experience of efficacy (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Bodily feelings and psychological defence. A specification of Gendlin’s concept of felt sense.Jan Puc - 2020 - Ceskoslovenska Psychologie 64 (2):129-142.
    The paper aims to define the concept of “felt sense”, introduced in psychology and psychotherapy by E. T. Gendlin, in order to clarify its relation to bodily sensations and its difference from emotions. Gendlin’s own definition, according to which the felt sense is a conceptually vague bodily feeling with implicit meaning, is too general for this task. Gendlin’s definition is specified by pointing out, first, the different layers of awareness of bodily feelings and, second, the difference between bodily readiness for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Nevědomí jako dvojznačné vědomí. Merleau-Ponty o psychoanalýze.Jan Puc - 2020 - Ostium 16 (1).
    Merleau-Ponty’s attitude to psychoanalysis was ambiguous. On the one hand, he realized that the phenomena psychoanalysis deals with require to go beyond the area of ​​act intentionality, and that, from a different angle, psychoanalysis addresses the same problem as Gestalt psychology, which played the central role in Merleau-Ponty’s philosophical project. On the other hand, he explicitly rejected the terms used by Freud for conveying his discoveries. Merleau-Ponty replaced unconscious mental contents, which act on conscious behavior, by ambiguous consciousness. In the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. At the Limits: What Drives Experiences of the Sublime.Jérôme Dokic & Margherita Arcangeli - 2020 - British Journal of Aesthetics (2):145-161.
    Aesthetics, both in its theoretical and empirical forms, has seen a renewed interest in the sublime, an aesthetic category dear to traditional philosophers, but quite neglected by contemporary philosophy. Our aim is to offer a novel perspective on the experience of the sublime. More precisely, our hypothesis is that the latter arises from ‘a radical limit-experience’, which is a metacognitve awareness of the limits of our cognitive capacities as we are confronted with something indefinitely greater or more powerful than us. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Varieties of Embodiment in Cognitive Science.Nicolás Alessandroni - 2018 - Theory & Psychology 28 (2):227-248.
    This article presents an epistemological multilevel analysis of the embodied cognition studies’ programme. It is proposed that within the cognitive-embodied type it is possible to find at least four distinct hypotheses regarding the role of the body in human cognition: (a) body-in-action hypothesis, (b) extended body hypothesis, (c) ecological body hypothesis, and (d) body-as-a-physical-datum hypothesis. The foundations of these hypotheses and some philosophical debates underlying embodiment are discussed in-depth. After briefly addressing the key contributions of social embodied theories, the article (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Embodiment in High-Altitude Mountaineering: Sensing and Working with the Weather.Jacquelyn Allen-Collinson, Lee Crust & Christian Swann - 2019 - Body and Society 25 (1):90-115.
    In order to address sociological concerns with embodiment and learning, in this article we explore the ‘weathering’ body in a currently under-researched physical-cultural domain. Weather experiences, too, are under-explored in sociology, and here we examine in depth the lived experience of weather and, more specifically, ‘weather work’ and ‘weather learning’ in one of the most extreme and corporeally challenging environments on earth: high-altitude mountains. Drawing on a theoretical framework of phenomenological sociology, and an interview-based research project with 19 international, high-altitude (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Mental Representation and the Cognitive Architecture of Skilled Action.Thomas Schack & Cornelia Frank - forthcoming - Review of Philosophy and Psychology:1-20.
    The aim of this paper is to understand the functional role of mental representations and intentionality in skilled actions from a systems related perspective. Therefore, we will evaluate the function of representation and then discuss the cognitive architecture of skilled actions in more depth. We are going to describe the building blocks and levels of the action system that enable us to control movements such as striking the tennis ball at the right time, or grasping tools in manual action. Based (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Reduction and Reflection After the Analytic-Continental Divide.Jacob Rump - forthcoming - In Hanne Jacobs (ed.), The Husserlian Mind.
    In this chapter, I discuss some lesser-known aspects of Husserl’s concept of the phenomenological reduction in relation to his use of the notion of reflection, and indicate how these topics connect to concerns in contemporary philosophy after the analytic-continental divide. Empathy, collective intentionality, non-representationalism, non-cognitivism, and the focus on the lived body as a source of sense-making and knowing-how are all domains in which Husserl’s conception of the reduction anticipates recent philosophical trends after the analytic-continental divide. They are also interconnected (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Exploring Inner Perceptions: Interoception, Literature, and Mindfulness.K. Kukkonen - 2019 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 26 (11-12):107-132.
    This article establishes a connection between the novel, as a cultural artefact which encourages the exploration of inner perceptions, literary reading, and recent research into interoception in cognitive psychology. Interoception is broadly conceived here, ranging from physical states (like pulse, breathing rate, etc.) to emotions and the conscious perception of these physical states. The article identifies relevant interoceptive mechanisms in literary reading and develops a research programme for their empirical study. It unfolds an account of the relationship between interoception and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. The Subjectivity of Experiential Consciousness: It’s Real and It’s Bodily.Lana Kuhle - 2017 - Mind and Matter 1 (15):91-109.
    Experiential consciousness is characterized by subjectivity: There is something it is like to be a subject of experience – a first-personal perspective, a what-it-is-like-for-me. In this paper I defend two proposals. First, I contend that to understand the subjectivity of consciousness we must turn to the subject: we are embodied sub- jects of experience. Thus, I argue, the subjectivity of experiential consciousness should be understood as a bodily subjectivity. Sec- ond, if we take this approach, I propose that we can (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. What Is It Like To Become a Bat? Heterogeneities in an Age of Extinction.Stephanie Erev - 2018 - Environmental Humanities 1 (10):129-149.
    In his celebrated 1974 essay “What Is It Like to Be a Bat?,” Thomas Nagel stages a human-bat encounter to illustrate and support his claim that “subjective experience” is irreducible to “objective fact”: because Nagel cannot experience the world as a bat does, he will never know what it is like to be one. In Nagel’s account, heterogeneity is figured negatively—as a failure or lack of resemblance—and functions to constrain his knowledge of bats. Today, as white-nose syndrome threatens bat populations (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Embodiment and Place in Autobiographical Remembering: A Relational-Material Approach.S. D. Brown & P. Reavey - 2018 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 25 (7-8):200-224.
    The relationship between place and remembering has been a long-standing matter of phenomenological concern. The role of the 'lived body' in mediating acts of remembering in context is clearly crucial. In this paper we contribute to an 'expanded view of memory' by describing how remembering difficult or problematic events -- 'vital memories' -- draws upon inter-subjective and inter-objective relations. We discuss two conceptual tools that provide an analytic framework -- the concept of 'life space' drawn from Kurt Lewin and the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Working with Embodied Memory: The Moving Cycle as a Phenomenological Body Psychotherapy Method.C. Caldwell & S. C. Koch - 2018 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 25 (7-8):242-255.
    We tend to think of memory as the brain's storing of experiences so that they can later be called up into reflective awareness. Recent phenomenological theorizing, medical, epigenetic, and neuroscientific findings, as well as observations from body psychotherapies have refined and altered this notion, and we now understand the storing of experiences as occurring not only in the brain but also throughout the body. For the implicit part of those processes, phenomenology speaks of body memory. All advances in our understanding (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Body Memory as a Form of Social Memory.G. Sebald - 2018 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 25 (7-8):181-199.
    Within a sociological framework, the concept of memory is detached from its privileged link to consciousness and a concept of body memory is developed as it is effective in social processes. As a first step, some principles and distinctions of a sociology of memory are outlined. As a second step it is necessary to analyse the processing of the present into generalized forms of experiences, remnants, which can be used for recollections. As a third step, the process of integrating these (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. A Grammar for the Mind: Time Embodied and Disembodied.B. Kotchoubey - 2018 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 25 (7-8):66-88.
    A philosophical idea about a particular relation of humans to time has found its recent psychological development in the form of the hypothesis that at some age point human children acquire a specific ability to describe the past and to think about the future, while animals do not possess this ability but are 'stuck in time'. On the other hand, animals definitely possess memory, and their behaviour constitutes a set of anticipations. A solution of this contradiction is proposed on the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. The Cyclical Time of the Body and its Relation to Linear Time.T. Fuchs - 2018 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 25 (7-8):47-65.
    While linear time results from the measurement of physical events, the temporality of life is characterized by cyclical processes, which also manifest themselves in subjective bodily experience. This applies for the periodicity of heartbeat, respiration, sleep-wake cycle, or circadian hormone secretion, among others. The central integration of rhythmic bodily signals in the brain forms the biological foundation of the phenomenal sense of temporal continuity. Cyclical repetitions are also found in the recurring phases of need, drive, and satisfaction. Finally, the cyclical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  22. What is It Like to Be Disconnected From the Body?: A Phenomenological Account of Disembodiment in Depersonalization/Derealization Disorder.S. Tanaka - 2018 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 25 (5-6):239-262.
    So long as I maintain the ordinary modes of experience such as walking or eating, the body appears to me as something inseparable from myself. Through and with the body I act in the world, and through and from the body I perceive the world. However, this is not the case in the pathological condition known as depersonalization/ derealization disorder. People with DD frequently claim that their self is disconnected from the body and their bodily actions feel like those of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Writer's Block Revisited: A Micro-Phenomenological Case Study on Blocking Influence of an Internalized Voice.E. B. Horwitz, C. Stenfors & W. Osika - 2018 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 25 (3-4):9-28.
    Writer's block, a common form of procrastination, can have a serious negative impact on an individual's academic performance. In this case study, a student with writer's block was interviewed and asked to perform body movements that represented the process of writing a master's thesis. A micro-phenomenological method was used to investigate the student's experience of writer's block and the role of an inner voice. The analysis unveiled the process by which the inner voice impeded the student, i.e. how the student (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. The Embodied Phenomenology of Phenomenology.S. Gallagher - 2015 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 22 (3-4):93-107.
    We argue that bodily affects are in part constitutive of phenomenal consciousness. We find resources in Phenomenology, psychology, and neuroscience that point to the importance of bodily affects for shaping not only our perceptions of and judgments about the world, but the phenomenal 'something it is like' to experience such perceptions and judgments.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Extending Emotional Consciousness.T. Roberts - 2015 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 22 (3-4):108-128.
    Recent work on extended mind theory has considered whether the material realizers of phenomenally conscious states might be distributed across both body and world. A popular framework for understanding perceptual consciousness in world-involving terms is sensorimotor enactivism, which holds that subjects make direct sensory contact with objects by means of their active, exploratory skills. In this paper, I consider the case of emotional experience, and argue that although the enactivist view does not transfer neatly to this domain, there are elements (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  26. On the Multimodality of Body Perception in Action.H. Y. Wong - 2014 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 21 (11-12):130-139.
    Recent research on proprioception reveals that it relies on a stored representation of bodily dimensions which is systematically distorted. This generates a puzzle about the role of proprioception in action. On the one hand, action requires accurate bodily parameters to be successful; yet if proprioception relies on a systematically distorted model of bodily dimensions, then proprioceptive perception of limb position will contain systematic errors. This pushes us to jettison proprioception as a key source of parameters for motor control; yet the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  27. Deja Vecu and Deja Visite Similarities and Differences: Initial Results From an Online Investigation.A. Funkhouser & M. Schredl - 2014 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 21 (11-12):7-18.
    It has been posited that the experience commonly called 'deja vu' can be subdivided into several types of deja experience. For the past nine years an internet questionnaire has collected data about what are called 'deja vecu' and 'deja visite' experiences. It is clear from the data that deja vecu experiences occur more frequently than do deja visite ones. Further analysis of the data has shown that deja vecu experiences were rated as being significantly longer than those of deja visite. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Sensorimotor Expectations and the Visual Field.Dan Cavedon-Taylor - forthcoming - Synthese:1-16.
    Sensorimotor expectations concern how visual experience covaries with bodily movement. Sensorimotor theorists argue from such expectations to the conclusion that the phenomenology of vision is constitutively embodied: objects within the visual field are experienced as 3-D because sensorimotor expectations partially constitute our experience of such objects. Critics argue that there are two ways to block the above inference: to explain how we visually experience objects as 3-D, one may appeal to such non-bodily factors as expectations about movements of objects, not (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  29. Our Body Is the Measure: Malebranche and the Body-Relativity of Sensory Perception.Colin Chamberlain - forthcoming - Oxford Studies in Early Modern Philosophy.
    Malebranche holds that sensory experience represents the world from the body’s point of view. I argue that Malebranche gives a systematic analysis of this bodily perspective in terms of the claim that the five familiar external senses and bodily awareness represent nothing but relations to the body.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30. The Bodily Other and Everyday Experience of the Lived Urban World.Oren Bader & Aya Peri Bader - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 3 (2):93-109.
    This article explores the relationship between the bodily presence of other humans in the lived urban world and the experience of everyday architecture. We suggest, from the perspectives of phenomenology and architecture, that being in the company of others changes the way the built environment appears to subjects, and that this enables us to perform simple daily tasks while still attending to the built environment. Our analysis shows that in mundane urban settings attending to the environment involves a unique attentional (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  31. A Bodily Sense of Self in Descartes and Malebranche.Colin Chamberlain - 2016 - In Jari Kaukua & Tomas Ekenberg (eds.), Subjectivity and Selfhood in Medieval and Early Modern Philosophy. Basel, Switzerland: pp. 219-234.
    Although Descartes and Malebranche argue that we are immaterial thinking things, they also maintain that each of us stands in a unique experiential relation to a single human body, such that we feel as though this body belongs to us and is part of ourselves. This paper examines Descartes’s and Malebranche’s accounts of this feeling. They hold that our experience of being embodied is grounded in affective bodily sensations that feel good or bad: namely, sensations of pleasure and pain, hunger (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. Fantom Ciała Jako Cielesna Samoświadomość.Przemysław Nowakowski - 2010 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 1 (1).
    According to Peter Halligan, […] it is important to consider that the experience of our body is largely the product of a continuously updated „phantom” generated by the brain.. Next, he adds: I will argue that the prevalent common sense assumption of phantom experience as pathological is wrongheaded and largely based on a long-standing and pernicious folk assumption that the physical body is necessary for experience of a body.. These two remarks can serve as a backdrop for a discussion of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. A Body Worth Defending. Opening Up a Few Concepts: Introductory Ruminations.Ed Cohen - 2012 - Avant: Trends in Interdisciplinary Studies 3 (1):65-96.
    The following text is an introduction to Ed Cohen’s book A Body Worth Defending: Immunity, Biopolitics and the Apotheosis of the Modern Body. Author investigates the way in which immunology influences the perception of both the human body, and political entities, demonstrating that contemporary conceptualizations of these phenomena exist in a double bind. The historical framework Cohen applies allows for tracing the history of the metaphor of immunity in politics and medicine.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Pain, Care, and the Body: A Response to de Vignemont.Colin Klein - 2017 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 95 (3):588-593.
    Frédérique de Vignemont argues on the basis of several empirical counterexamples that Bain and Klein are wrong about the relationship between pain and bodily care. I argue that the force of the putative counterexamples is weak. Properly understood, the association between pain and care is preserved in a way that is consistent with both de Vignemont's own views and the empirical facts.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  35. The Self in Neuroscience and Psychiatry.Helena De Preester - 2006 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 5 (1):119-124.
  36. Emotional Experience: Affective Consciousness and its Role in Emotion Theory.Fabrice Teroni & Julien Deonna - 2020 - In Uriah Kriegel (ed.), Oxford Handbook of the Philosophy of Consciousness. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 102-123.
    This paper explores substantive accounts of emotional phenomenology so as to see whether it sheds light on key features of emotions. To this end, we focus on four features that can be introduced by way of an example. Say Sam is angry at Maria’s nasty remark. The first feature relates to the fact that anger is a negative emotion, by contrast with positive emotions such as joy and admiration (valence). The second feature is how anger differs from other emotions such (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37. From Epistemic Actions to Scientific Discourse: The Bridging Function of Gestures.Wolff-Michael Roth - 2003 - Pragmatics and Cognition 11 (1):141-170.
    The role of gestures in communication is still debated: Some claim that gestures are merely ancillary forms of expressions, whereas others suggest a central role of gestures in the development of language. In this article, I provide data in support of the overarching hypothesis that gestures have a transitional function between ergotic/epistemic movements of hands and symbolic expressions. The context for the study of these transitions is constituted by school science laboratory activities conducted by students who are also asked to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. On Sensations of Position.G. E. M. Anscombe - 1962 - Analysis 22 (3):55.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   24 citations  
  39. The Threefold Cord: Mind, Body, and World. [REVIEW]Katalin Farkas - 2003 - Mind 112 (448):786-789.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   50 citations  
  40. Bodily Discursions: Genders, Representations, Technologies. [REVIEW]Maureen Connolly - 2001 - American Journal of Semiotics 17 (4):367-369.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. “My Body Survives by Uttering Itself”.Kari J. Winter - 1999 - Inquiry: Critical Thinking Across the Disciplines 18 (3):53-62.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Chapter 9. The State: The Embodiment of the Third Self.Paul Cobben - 2009 - In The Nature of the Self: Recognition in the Form of Right and Morality. Walter de Gruyter.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Embodiment and Experience: The Existential Ground of Culture and Self.Thomas J. Csordas (ed.) - 1994 - Cambridge University Press.
    Students of culture have been increasingly concerned with the ways in which cultural values are 'inscribed' on the body. These essays go beyond this passive construal of the body to a position in which embodiment is understood as the existential condition of cultural life. From this standpoint embodiment is reducible neither to representations of the body, to the body as an objectification of power, to the body as a physical entity or biological organism, nor to the body as an inalienable (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   28 citations  
  44. Ghost Buster: The Reality of One's Own Body.Frédérique De Vignemont - unknown
    What are the epistemic bases of the knowledge of the reality of our own body? Proprioception plays a primordial role in body representation and more particularly at the level of body schema. Without proprioception people can feel amputated and the mislocalization of proprioceptive information through the remapping of the Penfield Homonculus induces illusions of phantom limbs, illusions that contradictory visual feedback cannot erase. However, it turns out that it is not as simple as that and that vision also intervenes in (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  45. The Marginal Body.Frédérique De Vignemont - unknown
    According to Gurwitsch, the body is at least at the margin of consciousness. If all components of the field of consciousness were experienced as equally salient, we would indeed not be able to think and behave appropriately. Though the body may become the focus of our conscious field when we are introspectively aware of it, it remains most of the time only at the background of consciousness. However, we may wonder if bodily states do really need to be conscious, even (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  46. Widening the Body to Rubber Hands and Tools: What's the Difference?Frédérique De Vignemont - unknown
    The brain represents the body in different ways for different purposes. Several concepts and even more numerous labels have historically been proposed to define these representations in operational terms. Recent evidence of embodiment of external objects has added complexity to an already quite intricate picture. In particular, because of their perceptual and motor effects, both rubber hands and tools can be conceived as embodied, that is, represented in the brain as if they were parts of one's own body. But are (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   6 citations  
  47. An Existential-Phenomenological Investigation of Women’s Experience of Becoming Less Obsessed with Their Bodily Appearance.Jennifer K. Kirby - 2016 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 16 (sup1):1-15.
    This study investigated women’s lived experience of becoming less obsessed with their bodily appearance. Written narrative accounts were collected from seven women co-participants and a phenomenological analysis of these descriptive protocols was then performed in order to reveal the prereflective structure of the focal phenomenon, seven essential constituents of which emerged. A major goal of this research was to contribute to the undernourished area of phenomenological research regarding the experience of body image.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. With My Body.John Bate - 1988 - New Blackfriars 69 (822):529-529.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. This My Body.Tom Cullinan - 1987 - New Blackfriars 68 (811):567-571.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. III—The Embodiment of Mind or What Use is Having a Body?Jonathan Harrison - 1974 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 74 (1):35-55.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 634