This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

479 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 479
  1. Personhood, Ethics, and Disability: A Comparison of Byzantine, Boethian, and Modern Concepts of Personhood.Scott M. Williams - 2020 - In Disability in Medieval Christian Philosophy and Theology. Oxford: Routledge. pp. 80-108.
    This chapter compares three different general accounts of personhood (Byzantine, Boethian, and Modern) and argues that if personhood is the basis on which one has equal moral status in the moral community and the disability-positive position is correct, then the Byzantine and Boethian accounts are preferable over the Modern accounts that are surveyed here. It further argues that the Byzantine account is even friendlier to a disability-positive position compared to the Boethian account.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Every Happy Man is a God: Deification in Boethius.Michael Wiitala - 2019 - In Jared Ortiz (ed.), Deification in the Latin Patristic Tradition. Washington, DC, USA: pp. 231-252.
    Boethius is unique among Christian authors in late antiquity in that his account of deification makes no explicit reference to Christ. Instead, he develops a distinctly Neo-Platonic notion of deification, which he puts in the mouth of Lady Philosophy. According to Lady Philosophy, human beings are made divine through participation in God, who is understood as happiness itself, goodness itself, and unity itself. On the basis of this identification of happiness and God, Lady Philosophy concludes that the happiness human beings (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Persons in Patristic and Medieval Christian Theology.Scott M. Williams - 2019 - In Antonia LoLordo (ed.), Persons: A History. New York, USA: Oxford University Press.
    Introduction: -/- It is likely that Boethius (480-524ce) inaugurates, in Latin Christian theology, the consideration of personhood as such. In the Treatise Against Eutyches and Nestorius Boethius gives a well-known definition of personhood according to genus and difference(s): a person is an individual substance of a rational nature. Personhood is predicated only of individual rational substances. This chapter situates Boethius in relation to significant Christian theologians before and after him, and the way in which his definition of personhood is a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  4. Introduction: Consequences in Medieval Logic.Jacob Archambault - 2018 - Vivarium 56 (3-4):201-221.
    _ Source: _Volume 56, Issue 3-4, pp 201 - 221 This paper summarizes medieval definitions and divisions of consequences and explains the import of the medieval development of the theory of consequence for logic today. It then introduces the various contributions to this special issue of _Vivarium_ on consequences in medieval logic.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. Boethius and the Causal Direction Strategy.Jonathan Evans - 2018 - Ancient Philosophy 38 (1):167-185.
    Contemporary work on Boethius' Consolation of Philosophy often overlooks a discussion in CP.V.3 of a Peripatetic strategy for dissolving theological fatalism. Boethius’ treatment of this strategy and the lesson it provides about divine foreknowledge requires a reorientation of our understanding of the Consolation text. The result is that it is not foreknowledge nor any other temporally-conditioned knowledge that motivates Boethian concern but divine knowledge simpliciter.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Sicut Aristoteles loquitur, sic exponit Boethius. Essai de “simplification” archéologique.Leone Gazziero - 2018 - In Jean-Baptiste Brenet & Laurent Cesalli (eds.), Sujet libre. Pour Alain de Libera. Paris: Vrin. pp. 149-154.
  7. The Consolation of Philosophy as Cosmic Image.Myra L. Uhlfelder - 2018 - Tempe, AZ: ACMRS.
    In this study, Uhlfelder argues convincingly that, in portraying his literary persona as an exemplum of man in his quest for self-knowledge, Boethius has made the whole Consolatio a cosmic image representing man as microcosm. The mental faculties of sensus, imaginatio, ratio, and intellegentia are arranged as a proportion suggesting both Plato’s famous “divided line” at the end of Book 6 of the Republic and, at the same time, the four elements of the physical cosmos which, according to the Platonic (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Boethius’ Übersetzungsprojekt: Philosophische Grundlagen und didaktische Methoden eines spätantiken Wissenstransfers.Christian Vogel - 2016 - Wiesbaden, Germany: Harrassowitz.
    Boethius fasst im 6. Jahrhundert den Plan, samtliche Werke Aristoteles' und Platons ins Lateinische zu ubersetzen und mit Kommentaren zu versehen. Die Motivation fur dieses Projekt liegt in seiner Einsicht in die bildungstheoretischen Grundlagen des Platonismus und des Aristotelismus begrundet, die ihm auch als Massstab fur seine ethischen Erkenntnisse und sein padagogisch orientiertes Schaffen dienen. Daruber hinaus liefert seine Sorge um die Anschlussfahigkeit dieser Bildungstradition an die gesellschaftlichen Bedingungen im lateinischsprachigen Raum seiner Zeit den entscheidenden Impuls. Ziel dieses Buches ist (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Boethius and Stoicism.Matthew Walz - 2016 - In John Sellars (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of the Stoic Tradition. London: pp. 70-84.
    In this chapter from a collection on the Stoici tradition, I explore Boethius’s works chronologically in order to elucidate his overall evaluation of Stoicism as a philosophy. It turns out that Boethius offers a "mixed review"' of Stoicism. Beginning with references to the Stoics in his logical works and then turning to the 'Consolation', I delineate the intelligible contours of Stoicism as Boethius sees it, including the positive impetus Stoicism provides toward a philosophical apprehension of reality as well as its (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. The Consolation of Boethius as Poetic Liturgy.Stephen Blackwood - 2015 - Oxford, England: Oxford University Press.
    Throughout Antiquity and the Middle Ages, literature was read with the ear as much as with the eye: silent reading was the exception; audible reading, the norm. This highly original book shows that Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy--one of the most widely-read texts in Western history--aims to affect the listener through the designs of its rhythmic sound. Stephen Blackwood argues that the Consolation's metres are arranged in patterns that have a therapeutic and liturgical purpose: as a bodily mediation of the text's (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. To Be in a Subject and Accident.José Miguel Gambra - 2015 - Vivarium 53 (2-4):170-193.
    _ Source: _Volume 53, Issue 2-4, pp 170 - 193 Boethius identifies beings that _are in_ a subject with what the Scholastics called predicamental accident, and predication by accident with the predication of what _is in_ a subject. The first of these questionable assimilations went on to become terminology commonly accepted by Scholastics of all eras. On the other hand, the second, which seems quite consistent with the thinking of Aristotle, was only admitted with many reservations, probably because of the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Passions of the Soul and the Humanistic Society in the Theories of Plutarch, Aristotle, the Stoics, Boethius.Archontissa Kokotsaki - 2015 - Dialogue and Universalism 25 (1):195-202.
    According to Plutarch, the theory of psychological disharmony relies on the Platonic music harmony. When Plato refers to music harmony, he means the kind of harmony where the concept of God is the source through which all beings emanate. The mental passions define the quality of human character and consequently develop the social man. As far as the Aristotelian ethical theory is concerned, morality does not condemn the passions, because it has a clear ontological and anthropological basis. The Stoics stress (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. From Analysis of Words to Metaphysical Appreciation of the World: The Platonism of Boethius.Taki Suto - 2015 - Quaestio 15:321-331.
    Anicius Manlius Seuerinus Boethius has been regarded one of the major sources of Platonism in the Middle Ages, and the influence of different Platonists on his thought has been widely discussed. In his Aristotelian commentaries, however, Boethius rejects Platonists’ opinions while saying that Aristotle and Plato essentially agree. Boethius may have intended to show the agreement he saw, but did not provide any explanation in his works. In this article, I consider how Boethius could have seen such an agreement. While (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. The Commentary on the De arithmetica of Boethius.of Chartres Thierry (ed.) - 2015 - Toronto, Canada: Pontifical Institute of Mediaeval Studies.
    Arithmetic was one of the seven liberal arts taught in the French schools just before the middle of the twelfth century, and Boethius’s De arithmetica was the principal textbook for this art. This volume provides an edition of a commentary on the De arithmetica; the accompanying introduction identifies the author of the commentary as Thierry of Chartres, and provides a careful consideration of how the commentary reflects his philosophy. Unlike the commentaries on Plato's Timaeus and on Boethius's Consolatio philosophiae, medieval (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Nomen and Vocabulum in Boethius’s Theory of Predication.Monika Asztalos - 2014 - In Andreas Kirchner, Thomas Jürgasch & Thomas Böhm (eds.), Boethius as a Paradigm of Late Ancient Thought. De Gruyter. pp. 31-52.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Boethius, Disciple of Aristotle and Master of Theological Method: The Term Indemonstrabilis.Margherita Belli - 2014 - In Andreas Kirchner, Thomas Jürgasch & Thomas Böhm (eds.), Boethius as a Paradigm of Late Ancient Thought. De Gruyter. pp. 53-82.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17. Si Divinae Iudicium Mentis Habere Possemus: Zu den Formalen Argumentationszielen des Boethius in den Theologischen Traktaten Und in der Consolatio Philosophiae.Thomas Jürgasch - 2014 - In Andreas Kirchner, Thomas Jürgasch & Thomas Böhm (eds.), Boethius as a Paradigm of Late Ancient Thought. De Gruyter. pp. 101-146.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Altersprojektionen in Boethius' Consolatio Philosophiae.Christoph Kann - 2014 - In J. Wiener (ed.), Altersphantasien in Mittelalter Und Renaissance.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Boethius as a Paradigm of Late Ancient Thought.Andreas Kirchner, Thomas Jürgasch & Thomas Böhm (eds.) - 2014 - De Gruyter.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Boethius’s Consolatio and Plato’s Gorgias.John Magee - 2014 - In Andreas Kirchner, Thomas Jürgasch & Thomas Böhm (eds.), Boethius as a Paradigm of Late Ancient Thought. De Gruyter. pp. 13-30.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Boethius’s Unparadigmatic Originality and its Implications for Medieval Philosophy.John Marenbon - 2014 - In Andreas Kirchner, Thomas Jürgasch & Thomas Böhm (eds.), Boethius as a Paradigm of Late Ancient Thought. De Gruyter. pp. 231-244.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Subsistentia According to Boethius.Claudio Moreschini - 2014 - In Andreas Kirchner, Thomas Jürgasch & Thomas Böhm (eds.), Boethius as a Paradigm of Late Ancient Thought. De Gruyter. pp. 83-100.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. The Conquest of Happiness Through Philosophy: The Example of Boethius.Idalgo José Sangalli - 2014 - Trans/Form/Ação 37 (3):65-86.
    A análise visa a uma reflexão sobre ética e educação na obra De consolatione philosophiae, de Boécio. A partir da posição e atitude filosófica e de uma breve exposição geral do trabalho, procura-se compreender o processo boeciano de busca da felicidade, exposto no Livro III. No diálogo entre a Filosofia e Boécio, é retomada a ideia de que todos os homens desejam alcançar o bem final identificado como felicidade. Perdidos na multiplicidade fragmentada dos bens exteriores das paixões, os homens devem (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Boethius From Late Antiquity to the Early Middle Ages.Fabio Troncarelli - 2014 - In Andreas Kirchner, Thomas Jürgasch & Thomas Böhm (eds.), Boethius as a Paradigm of Late Ancient Thought. De Gruyter. pp. 213-230.
  25. Irvine, Susan, and Malcolm R. Godden, Eds., The Old English Boethius: With Verse Prologues and Epilogues Associated with King Alfred. [REVIEW]Kevin White - 2014 - Review of Metaphysics 68 (1):168-169.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. On Aristotle, On Interpretation, 1–3 by Boethius, And: On Aristotle, On Interpretation, 4–6 by Boethius (Review).Edward Buckner - 2013 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 51 (2):311-312.
    Boethius, “the first of the scholastics,” had an influence on the Latin Middle Ages that is difficult to overestimate. His translations of and commentaries on Aristotle’s philosophical and logical works were the main conduit between the Greek classical culture and the early Middle Ages. His two commentaries on Aristotle’s Peri Hermenias (“On Interpretation”), the longer of which is translated in the present two volumes (the first covering Books 1–3 and the second Books 4–6), were particularly influential. Unfortunately, those seeking to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Boethius on Mind, Grammar and Logic: A Study of Boethius' Commentaries on Peri Hermeneias. [REVIEW]Margaret Cameron - 2013 - History and Philosophy of Logic 34 (4):392-396.
  28. Un manuscrit d’Aristoteles Latinus à la National Diet Library, Tokyo, Japon.Pieter De Leemans, Atsuko Hosoi & Hidemi Takahashi - 2013 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 55:3-18.
    This article offers a description of the manuscript Tokyo, National Diet Library, Ms. WA42-29. This manuscript, purchased in London in 1987, contains Latin translations of Aristotle’s logical works, some original works on logic by Boethius, and William of Moerbeke’s Latin translation of De anima. It is most likely identical with a manuscript of a similar composition that disappeared in the first decades of the twentieth century from what is today the Hochschul- und Landesbibliothek Fulda. The manuscript was once part of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Forgetfulness and Misology in Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy.Antonio Donato - 2013 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (3):463 - 485.
    In book one of the Consolation of Philosophy, Boethius is portrayed as a man who suffers because he forgot philosophy. Scholars have underestimated the significance of this portrayal and considered it a literary device the goal of which is simply to introduce the discussion that follows. In this paper, I show that this view is mistaken since it overlooks that this portrayal of Boethius is the key for the understanding of the whole text. The philosophical therapy that constitutes the core (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  30. De Nouveau Sur la Prescience Et la Causalité Divines Chez Boece.Juvenal Savian Filho - 2013 - Chôra 11:91-115.
    Dans des travaux récents, l’aspect logique du thème de la prescience et de la causalité divines chez Boèce a été largement exploité, surtout dans les études vigoureuses de François Beets et John Marenbon. Cependant, si on considère l’ensemble des textes boéciens sans se borner à en privilégier quelques extraits, il apparaît que certains éléments de cette thématique peuvent encore être soulignés, principalement dans le sens du caractère négatif du discours sur la connaissance, la prescience et la causalité divines. Cela semble (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. L’Idéal Culturel de Boece Entre Savoir des Textes Et Textes du Savoir.Alain Galonnier - 2013 - Chôra 11:245-262.
    Le premier commentaire à l’Isagoge de Porphyre, réalisé à partir de la version de Marius Victorinus, semble avoir été pour Boèce l’occasion de faire converger deux analyses, mises au service d’un même idéalisme culturel, l’une propre à une certaine philologie, en un sens qu’il conviendra de définir, l’autre propre à la philosophie, dans son acception classique. Par bien des aspects, ce double cheminement nous paraît présenter des analogies avec ce que l’on observera à la Renaissance, lorsque les approches linguistiques et (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Die merk-würdigen Modi Baroco und Bocardo: Zur Axiomatik der Syllogismen bei Aristoteles, Boethius und den moderni.Reinhold F. Glei - 2013 - Bochumer Philosophisches Jahrbuch Fur Antike Und Mittelalter 16 (1):163-184.
  33. Divine Prescience and Contingency in Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy.John Marenbon - 2013 - Rivista di Storia Della Filosofia 68 (1):9-21.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Axiomatic Wisdom: Boethius’ De Hebdomadibus and the Liber de Causis in Late-Medieval Albertism.Mario Meliadò - 2013 - Bulletin de Philosophie Medievale 55:71-131.
    By developing a reassesment of the repertoire of Albertist literature in light of new manuscript witnesses, the article intends to reconstruct the late-medieval Albertist model of metaphysics and to investigate the crucial reception of Boethius’ De hebdomadibus and of the Liber de causis in the academic teaching and disputes of the early fifteenth century. The article focuses on two anonymous commentaries on these treatises, which were both composed by the same Albertist master , and analyzes their significance within the Albertist (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Aquinas’s Commentary on Boethius’s De Trinitate.Ariberto Acerbi - 2012 - Review of Metaphysics 66 (2):317-338.
    General remarks on some ontological premises of Aquinas' Epistemology.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. Evil as Nothing.Marilyn McCord Adams - 2012 - Modern Schoolman 89 (3-4):131-145.
    Anselm inherited a Platonizing approach to philosophy from Augustine and Boethius. But he characteristically reworked what he found in their texts by questioning and disputing it into something more rigorous. In this paper, I compare and contrast Anselm’s treatment of the trope ‘evil is nothing, not a being’ withBoethius’s use of it in The Consolation of Philosophy. In the first section, I expose a fallacious argument form common to them both: paradigm Fness is identical with paradigm Gness; X participates in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Evil as Nothing: Contrasting Construals in Boethius and Anselm.Marilyn McCord Adams - 2012 - Modern Schoolman 89 (3/4):131-145.
    Anselm inherited a Platonizing approach to philosophy from Augustine and Boethius. But he characteristically reworked what he found in their texts by questioning and disputing it into something more rigorous. In this paper, I compare and contrast Anselm’s treatment of the trope ‘evil is nothing, not a being’ withBoethius’s use of it in The Consolation of Philosophy. In the first section, I expose a fallacious argument form common to them both: paradigm Fness is identical with paradigm Gness; X participates in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Boethius on the Square of Opposition.Manuel Correia - 2012 - In J.-Y. Beziau & Dale Jacquette (eds.), Around and Beyond the Square of Opposition. Birkhäuser. pp. 41--52.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  39. Form and Universal in Boethius.Richard Cross - 2012 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 20 (3):439-458.
    Contrary to the claims of recent commentators, I argue that Boethius holds a modified version of the Ammonian three-fold universal (transcendent, immanent, and conceptual). He probably identifies transcendent universals as divine ideas, and accepts too forms immanent in corporeal particulars, most likely construing these along the Aphrodisian lines that he hints at in a well-known passage from his second commentary on Porphyry's Isagoge. Boethius never states the theory of the three-fold form outright, but I attempt to show that this theory (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  40. La consignificatio verbal (Peri Hermeneias 16B 8-10): Ammonio, Boecio y Tomás de Aquino.José Ángel García Cuadrado - 2012 - Revista Española de Filosofía Medieval 19:87-100.
  41. Remembering Boethius: Writing Aristocratic Identity in Late Medieval French and English Literatures.Elizabeth Elliott - 2012 - Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate.
    Remembering Boethius explores the rich intersection between the reception of Boethius and the literary construction of aristocratic identity, focusing on a body of late-medieval vernacular literature that draws on the Consolation of Philosophy to represent and reimagine contemporary experiences of exile and imprisonment. Elizabeth Elliott presents new interpretations of English, French, and Scottish texts, including Machaut's Confort d'ami, Remede de Fortune, and Fonteinne amoureuse, Jean Froissart's Prison amoureuse, Thomas Usk's Testament of Love, and The Kingis Quair, reading these texts as (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. The First Principles of Latin Neoplatonism: Augustine, Macrobius, Boethius.Stephen Gersh - 2012 - Vivarium 50 (2):113-138.
    This essay attempts to provide more evidence for the notions that there actually is a Latin (as opposed to a Greek) Neoplatonic tradition in late antiquity, that this tradition includes a systematic theory of first principles, and that this tradition and theory are influential in Western Europe during the Middle Ages. The method of the essay is intended to be novel in that, instead of examining authors or works in a chronological sequence and attempting to isolate doctrines in the traditional (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  43. The Problem of Negligent Omissions: Medieval Action Boethius and Anselm, Michael Barnwell. [REVIEW]Steven J. Jensen - 2012 - Modern Schoolman 89 (3-4):259-262.
  44. A Companion to Boethius in the Middle Ages.Noel Harold Kaylor & Philip Edward Phillips (eds.) - 2012 - Brill.
    The articles in this volume focus upon Boethius's extant works: his De arithmetica and a fragmentary De musica, his translations and commentaries on logic, his five theological texts, and, of course, his Consolation of Philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  45. Zum Eudämonologischen Konzept des Boethius: Eine Untersuchung Zur "Consolatio Philosophiae".Andreas Sirchich von Kis-Sira - 2012 - Avm, Akademische Verlagsgemeinschaft.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Boethius.Andrew W. Arlig - 2011 - In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. pp. 168--175.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Il Centro E la Circonferenza: Fortuna Del de Consolatione Philosophiae di Boezio Tra Valla E Leibniz.Margherita Belli - 2011 - L.S. Olschki.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Boethius Pro Se de Magia.Michael Fournier - 2011 - Dionysius 29.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Boethius' De Topicis Differentiis, Commentaries On.Heine Hansen - 2011 - In H. Lagerlund (ed.), Encyclopedia of Medieval Philosophy. Springer. pp. 176--178.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Adrian Papahagi, Boethiana Medievalia (A Collection of Studies on the Early Medieval Fortune of Boethius' Consolation of Philosophy).Walther Prager - 2011 - Chôra 9:501-504.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 479