Brain Death

Edited by Craig Paterson (Universidad Complutense de Madrid)
Related categories

509 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 509
  1. Agich, George J., and Bethan J. Spielman. Ethics Expert Testimony: Against the Skeptics 22, 381. Agich, George J., and Royce P. Jones. The Logical Status of Brain Death Criteria 10, 387. Allison, David, and Mark D. Roberts. On Constructing the Disorder of Hysteria 19, 239. Anderson, W. French. Human Gene Therapy: Scientific and Ethical Considerations 10, 275. [REVIEW]Johann S. Ach, Susanne Ackerman, F. Terrence, Allan Adelman & Howard See Adelman - 2003 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 360:5310.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. The Logical Status of Brain Death Criteria.G. J. Agich & R. P. Jones - 1985 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 10 (4):387-396.
    This article is an attempt to clarify a confusion in the brain death literature between logical sufficiency/necessity and natural sufficiency/necessity. We focus on arguments that draw conclusions regarding empirical matters of fact from conceptual or ontological definitions. Specifically, we critically analyze arguments by Tom Tomlinson and Michael B. Green and Daniel Wikler. which, respectively, confuse logical and natural sufficiency and logical and natural necessity. Our own conclusion is that it is especially important in discussing the brain death issue to observe (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  3. Personal Identity and Brain Death: A Critical Response.George J. Agich & Royce P. Jones - 1986 - Philosophy and Public Affairs 15 (3):267-274.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Human Death?Can There Be Agreement - 2013 - In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. Wiley. pp. 369.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. Biomedical Ethics in Japan: The Second Stage.Akira Akabayashi & Brian T. Slingsby - 2003 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 12 (3):261-264.
    In Japan, modern biomedical ethics emerged in the early 1980s. One of the main triggers was the nationwide debate on organ transplantation and brain death. A lengthy process of academic, religious, and political discussion concerning organ transplantation, lasting well over a few decades, resulted in the enactment of the Organ Transplantation Law in 1997.1 The defining of death and other bioethical issues, including death with dignity and euthanasia, were also stimulating topics throughout the latter end of the twentieth century. For (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  6. The Heart, the Gut, and Brain Death in Japan.Haruko Akatsu - 1990 - Hastings Center Report 20 (2):2-2.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. Invasive and Non-Invasive Neuromodulation in Movement Disorders.Maertens De Noordhout Alain - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. Refusal of Brain Death Diagnosis.Janice A. Anderson, Lawrence W. Vernaglia & Shirley P. Morrigan - 2007 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 9 (3):90-92.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  9. The Importance of Knowledge and Trust in the Definition of Death.R. I. X. Andreassen & Det Etiske Rod - 1990 - Bioethics 4 (3):232–236.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  10. After Saikewicz: No‐Fault Death.George J. Annas - 1978 - Hastings Center Report 8 (3):16-18.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  11. The Return of the Living Dead: Agency Lost and Found?Carmelo Aquilina & Julian C. Hughes - 2006 - In Julian C. Hughes, Stephen J. Louw & Steven R. Sabat (eds.), Dementia: Mind, Meaning, and the Person. Oxford University Press. pp. 143--161.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  12. On the Death of Human and Its History.Yubraj Aryal - 2010 - Journal of Philosophy: A Cross-Disciplinary Inquiry 5 (11):1-8.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Arguments Against Promoting Organ Transplants From Brain-Dead Donors, and Views of Contemporary Japanese on Life and Death.Atsushi Asai, Yasuhiro Kadooka & Kuniko Aizawa - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (4):215-223.
    As of 2009, the number of donors in Japan is the lowest among developed countries. On July 13, 2009, Japan's Organ Transplant Law was revised for the first time in 12 years. The revised and old laws differ greatly on four primary points: the definition of death, age requirements for donors, requirements for brain- death determination and organ extraction, and the appropriateness of priority transplants for relatives.In the four months of deliberations in the National Diet before the new law was (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  14. The Brain Dead Patient Is Still Sentient: A Further Reply to Patrick Lee and Germain Grisez.Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco - 2016 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 41 (3):315-328.
    Patrick Lee and Germain Grisez have argued that the total brain dead patient is still dead because the integrated entity that remains is not even an animal, not only because he is not sentient but also, and more importantly, because he has lost the radical capacity for sentience. In this essay, written from within and as a contribution to the Catholic philosophical tradition, I respond to Lee and Grisez’s argument by proposing that the brain dead patient is still sentient because (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  15. In Defense of the Loss of Bodily Integrity as a Criterion for Death: A Response to the Radical Capacity Argument.Nicanor Pier Giorgio Austriaco - 2009 - The Thomist 73 (4):647-659.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  16. Report on Analysis Problem No. 5 "Does It Make Sense to Say That Death is Survived?'.A. J. Ayer - 1954 - Analysis 14 (6):127-128.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  17. Individual Choice in the Definition of Death.A. Bagheri - 2007 - Journal of Medical Ethics 33 (3):146-149.
    While there are numerous doubts, controversies and lack of consensus on alternative definitions of human death, it is argued that it is more ethical to allow people to choose either cessation of cardio-respiratory function or loss of entire brain function as the definition of death based on their own views. This paper presents the law of organ transplantation in Japan, which allows people to decide whether brain death can be used to determine their death in agreement with their family. Arguably, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  18. Criticism of "Brain Death" Policy in Japan.Alireza Bagheri - 2003 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 13 (4):359-372.
    : The 1997 Japanese organ transplantation law is the fruit of a long debate on "brain death" and organ transplantation, which involved the general public and experts in the relevant fields. The aim of this paper is to trace the history of the implementation of the law and to critique the law in terms of its consistency and fairness. The paper argues that the legislation adopts a double standard regarding the role of the family. On the one hand, the legislation (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  19. The Case of Samuel Golubchuk and the Right to Be Spared an Excruciating Death.Tracey Bailey & Brendan Leier - 2010 - American Journal of Bioethics 10 (3):67-68.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20. Alla fine della vita: bioetica e medicina alla ricerca di un confine [At the end of life: bioethics and medicine looking for a boundary].Rosangela Barcaro - 2015 - Laboratorio Dell’ISPF [Online First] 1824-9817.
    Bioethics, neuroscience, medicine are contributing to a debate on the definition and criteria of death. This topic is very controversial, and it demonstrates clashing views on the meaning of human life and death. Official medical and legal positions agree upon a biological definition of death as irreversible cessation of integrated functioning of the organism as a whole, and whole-brain criterion to ascertain death. These positions have to face many criticisms: some scholars speak of logical and practical inconsistency, some others of (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Il dibattito bioetico italiano. Laici vs. cattolici [Italian bioethical debate on brain death: lay vs religious attitudes].Rosangela Barcaro - 2014 - In Francesco Paolo de Ceglia (ed.), Storia della definizione di morte. FrancoAngeli. pp. 415-431.
    La cosiddetta “morte cerebrale totale”, o più correttamente “morte encefalica” (whole brain death), è un criterio fisiologico riferito alla cessazione irreversibile e permanente di tutte le funzioni dell’encefalo (emisferi e tronco encefalico), ed è correlato alla cessazione del funzionamento integrato dell’organismo. L’applicazione del criterio neurologico, e degli esami che lo accompagnano, è finalizzato ad una diagnosi clinica e strumentale per individuare una condizione causata da lesioni neurologiche diffuse e responsabili di coma, assenza di coscienza, di respirazione spontanea, di risposte agli (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  22. La morte dell’essere umano. Scienza o filosofia nell’accertamento del decesso?Rosangela Barcaro - 2010 - In Lorenzo Chieffi & Pasquale Giustiniani (eds.), Percorsi tra bioetica e diritto. Alla ricerca di un bilanciamento. Giappichelli. pp. 111-129.
    Nel quarantesimo anniversario della pubblicazione del rapporto di Harvard, ricordato da un editoriale di Lucetta Scaraffia sull’ “Osservatore Romano” il 3 settembre 2008, la riflessione sui criteri neurologici per accertare il decesso è sembrata giungere finalmente all’attenzione del pubblico italiano, dopo i dibattiti avviati nello scorso decennio in Gran Bretagna, Germania, Giappone e negli Stati Uniti. Per alcuni giorni sulle pagine dei quotidiani nazionali si sono alternate repliche, più o meno indignate, a quell’articolo e prese di posizione; poi, come è (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Quando muore l’uomo. La morte cerebrale nel recente dibattito internazionale [When does a man die? Brain death in the recent international debate].Rosangela Barcaro - 2009 - Museopolis Press.
    Ricostruzione del dissenso etico-filosofico relativo all'impiego del criterio neurologico della morte encefalica al fine della dichiarazione di decesso e del prelievo di organi per il trapianto. Esame del dibattito italiano e dei documenti di organismi ufficiali come il Centro Nazionale Trapianti (2009) ed il Comitato Nazionale per la Bioetica (2010).
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. P. Becchi, Morte Cerebrale E Trapianto Degli Organi. Una Questione di Etica Giuridica. [REVIEW]Rosangela Barcaro - 2008 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 11 (3):368-369.
    Review of a book on brain death and organ transplantation.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Il dogma che non c'è [An imaginary dogma].Rosangela Barcaro - 2007 - Liberal 7 (40):104-113.
    I criteri neurologici per accertare il decesso, da impiegare in alternativa a quelli cardiorespiratori se il paziente ha subìto lesioni cerebrali e si trova collegato alle apparecchiature per la ventilazione artificiale, sono entrati nell’uso comune della pratica medica occidentale da circa quarant’anni ed il consenso di cui essi godono nella comunità scientifica sembra, a prima vista, essere ancora oggi molto solido. Si diceva a prima vista, perché se si esamina con attenzione la letteratura dal 1992 ad oggi, si possono scoprire (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Ai confini della vita. Riflessione critica sulla nozione di morte cerebrale [Life borders. A critical appraisal of brain death].Rosangela Barcaro - 2007 - Humana.Mente 3:19-37.
    Sintesi delle tappe attraverso cui si è giunti alla formulazione di una teoria a sostegno dei criteri neurologici e alla loro introduzione nella prassi medico-legale per individuare le cause di un ripensamento critico dei fondamenti teorico-scientifici addotti per giustificare i criteri neurologici utilizzati per dichiarare la morte di pazienti con lesioni cerebrali collegati alle apparecchiature per la ventilazione artificiale.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. La morte cerebrale totale è la morte dell'organismo? Appunti per una riflessione critica.Rosangela Barcaro - 2005 - Materiali Per Una Storia Della Cultura Giuridica 35 (2):479-500.
    Sono discusse le principali argomentazioni medico-biologiche che costituiscono il nucleo della teoria secondo la quale la morte cerebrale totale corrisponde alla morte dell'essere umano. Speciale attenzione è riservata alla normativa che disciplina l’applicazione dei criteri per l'accertamento di morte e alle critiche che hanno mostrato come attualmente la teoria che fa da sostegno a quella normativa sia stata radicalmente messa in discussione.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  28. Refusal of Brain Death Diagnosis.Terry R. Bard - 2007 - Jona's Healthcare Law, Ethics, and Regulation 9 (3):92-94.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  29. Death in the Clinic.David Barnard, Celia Berdes, James L. Bernat, Linda Emanuel, Robert Fogerty, Linda Ganzini, Elizabeth R. Goy, David J. Mayo, John Paris, Michael D. Schreiber, J. David Velleman & Mark R. Wicclair - 2005 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Death in the Clinic fills a gap in contemporary medical education by explicitly addressing the concrete clinical realities about death with which practitioners, patients, and their families continue to wrestle. Visit our website for sample chapters!
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Ethics and Brain Death.Robert L. Barry - 1987 - New Scholasticism 61 (1):82-98.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. The Brain as an Organ of Mind.H. Charlton Bastian - 1881 - Mind 6 (21):120-131.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   19 citations  
  32. Techno-Thanatology: Moral Consequences of Introducing Brain Criteria for Death.Kurt Bayertz - 1992 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 17 (4):407-417.
    This paper is based on the hypothesis that the effort to establish new criteria for diagnosing human death, which has been taking place over the past twenty years or more, can be viewed as a paradigm case for the impact of scientific and technological progress on morality. This impact takes the form of three tendencies within the change in morality, which may be characterized as ‘denaturalization’, ‘functionalization’ and ‘homogenization’. The paper concludes with the view that these tendencies do not indicate (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Brain Death Revisited: It is Not 'Complete Death' According to Islamic Sources.Ahmet Bedir & Şahin Aksoy - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (5):290-294.
    Concepts, such as death, life and spirit cannot be known in their quintessential nature, but can be defined in accordance with their effects. In fact, those who think within the mode of pragmatism and Cartesian logic have ignored the metaphysical aspects of these terms. According to Islam, the entity that moves the body is named the soul. And the aliment of the soul is air. Cessation of breathing means leaving of the soul from the body. Those who agree on the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  34. Brain Life and Brain Death - The Anencephalic as an Explanatory Example. A Contribution to Transplantation.F. K. Beller & J. Reeve - 1989 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 14 (1):5-23.
    The current debate regarding the suitability of anencephalics as organ donors is due primarily to misunderstandings. The anatomical and neurophysiological literature shows that the anencephalic lacks a cerebrum because of the failure of neuralplate fusion. However, even the incomplete function of an atrophic brain stem is currently accepted at law in most if not all countries as sufficient for brain life: which is to say, cessation of breathing is currently required in order to make the diagnosis of brain death. Because (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. The Living Dead Fiction, Horror, and Bioethics.Catherine Belling - 2010 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 53 (3):439-451.
    The victim’s upper brain is destroyed. He’s a living corpse, but his organs are alive and warm and happy until they can be taken out by the butchers at the Institute. Karen Ann Quinlan wasn’t dead. But, terrifyingly, she wasn’t fully alive, either. Maybe she was no longer human. A smear like “death panels” emerges and catches fire because it’s fundamentally interesting. You could write a great thriller . . . about death panels. As I write, a single phrase dominates (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. Persons, Humanity, and the Definition of Death – John Lizza.Christopher Belshaw - 2008 - Philosophical Quarterly 58 (230):188–190.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Pragmatism and the Determination of Death.Martin Benjamin - forthcoming - Pragmatic Bioethics:193--206.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Death, Where Is Thy 'Cause'?Martin Benjamin - 1976 - Hastings Center Report 6 (3):15-16.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. Encounters With Death.David A. Bennahum - 1996 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 5 (1):7.
    I never saw a dead body until my first anatomy class. Today those who have willed their bodies to science receive letters of gratitude, visit with our students, and have their names put up on memorial plaques; but 37 years ago our subjects were derelicts and anonymous old men found dead in flop house hotels. George C, his name written on a tag tied to one toe, lay stretched out on one of the six dissecting tables in the anatomy laboratory (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  40. A Defense of the Whole-Brain Definition of Death.J. Bernat - 1998 - Hastings Center Report 28:14-23.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Death: Merely Biological? James L. Bernat Replies.J. L. Bernat - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (1):5-5.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Harmonizing Standards for Death Determination in DCDD.James L. Bernat - 2015 - American Journal of Bioethics 15 (8):10-12.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  43. Whither Brain Death?James L. Bernat - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (8):3-8.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   7 citations  
  44. Constitutes Human Death.James L. Bernat - 2013 - In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. Wiley. pp. 25--377.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. On Noncongruence Between the Concept and Determination of Death.James L. Bernat - 2013 - Hastings Center Report 43 (6):25-33.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
  46. The Debate Over Death Determination in DCD.James L. Bernat - 2010 - Hastings Center Report 40 (3):3-3.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  47. The Concept and Practice of Brain Death.James L. Bernat - 2006 - In Steven Laureys (ed.), Boundaries of Consciousness. Elsevier.
  48. The Whole-Brain Concept of Death Remains Optimum Public Policy.James L. Bernat - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (1):35-43.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  49. The Whole-Brain Concept of Death Remains Optimum Public Policy.James L. Bernat - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 34 (1):35-43.
    “Brain death,” the determination of human death by showing the irreversible loss of all clinical functions of the brain, has become a worldwide practice. A biophilosophical account of brain death requires four sequential tasks: agreeing on the paradigm of death, a set of preconditions that frame the discussion; determining the definition of death by making explicit the consensual concept of death; determining the criterion of death that proves the definition has been fulfilled by being both necessary and sufficient for death; (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   13 citations  
  50. On Irreversibility as a Prerequisite for Brain Death Determination.James L. Bernat - 2004 - In C. Machado & D. E. Shewmon (eds.), Brain Death and Disorders of Consciousness. Plenum. pp. 161--167.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 509