Business Ethics

Edited by Joakim Sandberg (University of Gothenburg)
About this topic
Summary Business ethics is the application of ethical theories and concepts to activity within and between commercial enterprises, and between commercial enterprises and their broader environment. It is a wide range of activity, and no brief list can be made of the issues it raises. The safety of working practices; the fairness of recruitment; the transparency of financial accounting; the promptness of payments to suppliers; the degree of permissible aggression between competitors: all come within the range of the subject. So do relations between businesses and consumers, local communities, national governments, and ecosystems. Many, but not all, of these issues can be understood to bear on distinct, recognized groups with their own stakes in a business: employees, shareholders, consumers, and so on. A central question concerns how businesses ought to weigh the interests of different stakeholders against each other; particularly what moral import to give to profit-making (presumably in the interest of shareholders in large corporations).
Key works Much of business ethics starts from Milton Friedman's provocative article "The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase Profits" (reprinted in Snoeyenbos et al 2001, Jennings 2002, ...). Some well-cited expressions of alternative views are Freeman 1994...
Introductions Some introductions by Snoeyenbos et al 2001, Shaw 2002.
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  1. Can Creativity Be a Collective Virtue? Insights for the Ethics of Innovation.Mandi Astola, Gunter Bombaerts, Andreas Spahn & Lambèr Royakkers - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-12.
    Virtue accounts of innovation ethics have recognized the virtue of creativity as an admirable trait in innovators. However, such accounts have not paid sufficient attention to the way creativity functions as a collective phenomenon. We propose a collective virtue account to supplement existing virtue accounts. We base our account on Kieran’s definition of creativity as a virtue and distinguish three components in it: creative output, mastery and intrinsic motivation. We argue that all of these components can meaningfully be attributed to (...)
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  2. When Crises Hit Home: How U.S. Higher Education Leaders Navigate Values During Uncertain Times.Brooke Fisher Liu, Duli Shi, JungKyu Rhys Lim, Khairul Islam, America L. Edwards & Matthew Seeger - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-16.
    Against the backdrop of a global pandemic, this study investigates how U.S. higher education leaders have centered their crisis management on values and guiding ethical principles. We conducted 55 in-depth interviews with leaders from 30 U.S. higher education institutions, with most leaders participating in two interviews. We found that crisis plans created prior to the COVID-19 pandemic were inadequate due to the long duration and highly uncertain nature of the crisis. Instead, higher education leaders applied guiding principles on the fly (...)
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  3. The Nature of the Self, Self-Regulation and Moral Action: Implications From the Confucian Relational Self and Buddhist Non-Self.Irene Chu & Mai Chi Vu - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    The concept of the self and its relation to moral action is complex and subject to varying interpretations, not only between different academic disciplines but also across time and space. This paper presents empirical evidence from a cross-cultural study on the Buddhist and Confucian notions of self in SMEs in Vietnam and Taiwan. The study employs Hwang’s Mandala Model of the Self, and its extension into Shiah’s non-self-model, to interpret how these two Eastern philosophical representations of the self, the Confucian (...)
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  4. In the Name of Merit: Ethical Violence and Inequality at a Business School.Devi Vijay & Vivek G. Nair - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-23.
    This study examines how meritocracy as a collective social imaginary promoting social justice and fairness reproduces class and caste inequalities and fosters ethical violence. We interrogate discourse of merit in the narratives of the professional–managerial class-in-making at an Indian business school. Empirically, we draw on interviews, full-text responses to a qualitative questionnaire, and a student’s poem. We describe how business school students articulate merit as a neoliberal ethic, emphasizing prudential, enterprising attitudes, and responsibility. However, this positive, aspirational façade of merit (...)
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  5. Islamic Religiosity and Auditors’ Judgements: Evidence from Pakistan.Nazia Adeel, Chris Patel, Nonna Martinov-Bennie & Sammy Xiaoyan Ying - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-22.
    We extend the literature by providing evidence that a cultural variable, intrinsic Islamic religiosity is important in understanding auditors’ judgement in the Islamic context of Pakistan. The intrinsic Islamic religiosity theoretical construct examined is Islamic Worldview which represents deeply held enduring and stable values which are likely to be dominant in influencing professionals’ judgements. Moreover, theoretical underpinning and empirical evidence in social psychology and organisational behaviour have established the critical role of intrinsic religiosity in influencing behaviour. Our first objective is (...)
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  6. Students Perception About Corporate Social Responsibility: Evidence From Pakistan.Zeeshan Ahmad, Mohsin Ahmad, Asif Iqbal & Maqsood Hayat - 2021 - International Journal of Business Governance and Ethics 1 (1):1.
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  7. The Interaction Between Suppliers and Fraudulent Customer Firms: Evidence From Trade Credit Financing of Chinese Listed Firms.Sirui Wu, Guangming Gong, Xin Huang & Haowen Tian - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    This study investigates the interaction between suppliers and fraudulent customer firms from the perspective of reputation damage and reputation recovery. Specifically, reputation damage from the regulatory penalty for corporate fraud induces the trust crisis and suppliers respond to fraudulent firms by reducing the trade credit supply. To repair a damaged reputation and rebuild the trust, fraudulent firms raise the ratio of prepayment to purchase volume when purchasing from small suppliers and increase the proportion of purchase from large suppliers in the (...)
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  8. Religion and Mortgage Misrepresentation.James Conklin, Moussa Diop & Mingming Qiu - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-23.
    We investigate whether religion acts as a deterrent to the types of mortgage misrepresentation that played a significant role in the recent housing boom and bust. Using a large sample of mortgages originated from 2000 to 2007, we provide evidence that local religious adherence is associated with a lower likelihood of home appraisal overstatement and owner occupancy misreporting. The evidence on borrower income misrepresentation is mixed. Religiosity does not appear to reduce the incidence of income misrepresentation; however, it seems to (...)
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  9. Board Gender Diversity and Managerial Obfuscation: Evidence From the Readability of Narrative Disclosure in 10-K Reports.Muhammad Nadeem - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-25.
    The readability of 10-K reports, in terms of linguistic complexity, determines the usefulness of information disclosure for stakeholders, particularly individual investors. Since investors largely depend on the financial communication in 10-K reports, firms have an ethical and legal responsibility to present disclosures in a language investors can understand. However, motivated by self-interest, managers obfuscate such disclosures to mask their own actions and hide unfavourable information. Building on the managerial obfuscation hypothesis grounded in stakeholder-agency and ethical-sensitivity theories, I hypothesize and empirically (...)
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  10. The Effect of Gender on Investors’ Judgments and Decision-Making.Yi Luo & Steven E. Salterio - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-22.
    We examine whether an unsophisticated investor’s own gender interacts with gender of a sell-side equity analyst to affect the investor’s judgment. Prior research shows two potential sources of gender-based discrimination that affect female investors. First, female investors’ advisors offer less risky hence lower return portfolios to female investors than to male investors with similar risk preferences as female investors are perceived as more risk adverse. Second, female equity analysts are subject to greater barriers to enter and advance in investment firms (...)
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  11. Review of Joy at Work: Organizing Your Professional Life by Marie Kondo and Scott Sonenshein. [REVIEW]M. Joy Hayes - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-2.
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  12. Why a Right to an Explanation of Algorithmic Decision-Making Should Exist: A Trust-Based Approach.Tae Wan Kim & Bryan R. Routledge - forthcoming - Business Ethics Quarterly:1-28.
    Businesses increasingly rely on algorithms that are data-trained sets of decision rules and implement decisions with little or no human intermediation. In this article, we provide a philosophical foundation for the claim that algorithmic decision-making gives rise to a “right to explanation.” It is often said that, in the digital era, informed consent is dead. This negative view originates from a rigid understanding that presumes informed consent is a static and complete transaction. Such a view is insufficient, especially when data (...)
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  13. How to Deter Financial Misconduct If Crime Pays?Karol Marek Klimczak, Alejo José G. Sison, Maria Prats & Maximilian B. Torres - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-18.
    Financial misconduct has come into the spotlight in recent years, causing market regulators to increase the reach and severity of interventions. We show that at times the economic benefits of illicit financial activity outweigh the costs of litigation. We illustrate our argument with data from the US Securities and Exchanges Commission and a case of investment misconduct. From the neoclassical economic paradigm, which follows utilitarian thinking, it is rational to engage in misconduct. Still, the majority of professionals refrain from misconduct, (...)
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  14. Young’s Social Connection Model and Corporate Responsibility.Robert Phillips & Judith Schrempf-Stirling - forthcoming - Philosophy of Management.
    Recent structural innovations in global commerce present difficult challenges for legacy understandings of responsibility. The rise of outsourcing, sub-contracting, and mobile app-based platforms have dramatically restructured relationships between and among economic actors. Though not entirely new, the remarkable rise in the prevalence of these “not-quite-arm’s-length” relationships present difficulties for conceptions of responsibility based on interrogating the past for specifiable actions by blameworthy actors. Iris Marion Young invites investigation of a “social connection model of responsibility” that is, in many ways, better (...)
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  15. Taking It Outside: A Study of Legal Contexts and External Whistleblowing in China and India.Sebastian Oelrich & Kimberly Erlebach - forthcoming - Asian Journal of Business Ethics.
    Whistleblowing is regularly identified as corporate control mechanism to prevent and uncover fraud. We review and compare the legal situation for whistleblowers in the People’s Republic of China and India. In a survey of 942 employees from private companies in both countries, we take a look at the status quo of whistleblowing system implementation, explore preference of channels to disclose fraud or corruption, and analyze under which conditions and what kind of employees prefer external over internal whistleblowing. We find that (...)
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  16. Is Relationality Always Other-Oriented? Adam Smith, Catholic Social Teaching, and Civil Economy.Paolo Santori - forthcoming - Philosophy of Management.
    Recent studies have investigated connections between Adam Smith’s economic and philosophical ideas and Catholic Social Teaching. Scholars argue that their common background lies in their respective anthropologies, both endorsing a relational view of human beings. I raise one main concern regarding these analyses. I suggest that the relationality endorsed by Smith lacks a central element present in CST—the other-oriented perspective which is the intentional concern for promoting the good of others. Some key elements of CST, such as love, gift, gratuitousness, (...)
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  17. The Promise of Pragmatism: Richard Rorty and Business Ethics.Sareh Pouryousefi & R. Edward Freeman - forthcoming - Business Ethics Quarterly:1-28.
    Pragmatists believe that philosophical inquiry must engage closely with practice to be useful and that practice serves as a source of social norms. As a growing alternative to the analytic and continental philosophical traditions, pragmatism is well suited for research in business ethics, but its role remains underappreciated. This article focuses on Richard Rorty, a key figure in the pragmatist tradition. We read Rorty as a source of insight about the ethical and political nature of business practice in contemporary global (...)
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  18. Self-Representation of Marginalized Groups: A New Way of Thinking Through W. E. B. Du Bois.Rashedur Chowdhury - forthcoming - Business Ethics Quarterly:1-25.
    I address an interesting puzzle of how marginalized groups gain self-representation and influence firms’ strategies. Accordingly, I examine the case of access to low-cost HIV/AIDS drugs in South Africa by integrating W. E. B. Du Bois’s work into stakeholder theory. Du Bois’s scholarly work, most notably his founding contribution to Black scholarship, has profound significance in the humanities and social sciences disciplines and vast potential to inspire a new way of thinking and doing research in the management and organization fields, (...)
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  19. Self-Perceived Misattributed Culpability or Incompetence at Work.Robin Stanley Snell, Almaz Man-Kuen Chak, May Mei-Ling Wong & Sandy Suk-Kwan Hui - forthcoming - Asian Journal of Business Ethics.
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  20. Seeing the Issue Differently (Or Not At All): How Bounded Ethicality Complicates Coordination Towards Sustainability Goals.S. Wiley Wakeman, George Tsalis, Birger Boutrup Jensen & Jessica Aschemann-Witzel - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  21. The Silenced and Unsought Beneficiary: Investigating Epistemic Injustice in the Fiduciary.Helen Mussell - forthcoming - Business Ethics Quarterly:1-23.
    This article uses philosopher Miranda Fricker’s work on epistemic injustice to shed light on the legal concept of the fiduciary, alongside demonstrating the wider contribution Fricker’s work can make to business ethics. Fiduciary, from the Latin fīdūcia, meaning “trust,” plays a fundamental role in all financial and business organisations: it acts as a moral safeguard of the relationship between trustee and beneficiary. The article focuses on the ethics of the fiduciary, but from a unique historical perspective, referring back to the (...)
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  22. Attuned HRM Systems for Social Enterprises.Silvia Dorado, Ying Chen, Andrea M. Prado & Virginia Simon - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  23. Ethics, Economics, and the Specter of Naturalism: The Enduring Relevance of the Harmony Doctrine School of Economics.Andrew Lynn - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  24. Virtue and Risk Culture in Finance.Anthony Asher & Tracy Wilcox - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  25. The Blinding Effects of Team Identification on Sports Corruption: Cross-Cultural Evidence From Sub-Saharan African Countries.Anastasia Stathopoulou, Tommy Kweku Quansah & George Balabanis - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  26. Conflict as Business.Steven van Klooster - 2020 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 31:152-159.
    The state monopoly on violence is a core concept of modern public law, wherein only sovereign nation-states may lay claim to the legitimised usage of physical force. In recent years, however, this is commonly outsourced through Private Military Companies. Using Satz’s model and Weber’s definition of modern democracies, we argue that the market of Private Military Companies is a noxious one with severe ramifications in regards to democracy, freedom, and the autonomy of nation-states globally.
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  27. Message From the 2020 Conference Chair.Harry Van Buren - 2020 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 31:2-3.
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  28. Mezcal: When Culture and Consumption Collide.Tara Ceranic Salinas - 2020 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 31:120-128.
    Mezcal is a spirit distilled from the heart of the agave plant. It has been produced via traditional methods in Mexico for centuries, but recently has found popularity in the United States and other countries. The rise in demand for this artisanal product could greatly benefit the eight states in which it is legally distilled with an influx of capital from tourism and export. However, with this popularity comes outside influence and the potential for unfair business practices and cultural appropriation. (...)
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  29. Corporate Social Responsibility and Stigma Management.Natalie M. Schneider - 2020 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 31:129-138.
    Workers of stigmatized jobs classified as dirty work normalize the physical, social, and/or moral taint of their occupation to cope with the negative aspects of their daily work. Such normalization strategies include recalibrating, reframing, and refocusing. Social identity theory proposes that individuals seek to identify with a positively perceived in-group, and dirty work literature suggests stigmatized workers use these normalization strategies to separate their personal and work identities. Additionally, corporate social responsibility meets the instrumental, relational, and moral-based motivational needs of (...)
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  30. The End of Corporate Political Activity.Tyler K. Wasson - 2020 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 31:139-151.
    Corporate political activity is one of the most prolific academic literatures which examines the political behaviors of corporations. CPA researchers often define it as a non-market strategy which corporations can engage in to influence political outcomes that complement their market objectives. In this paper I argue that, despite continuous theoretical development, CPA has not kept pace with changes in the political role and behaviors of corporations, particularly multinational corporations, which has resulted in an inaccurate view of the corporate political environment. (...)
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  31. Corporate Social Responsibility as Legitimacy in the Oil and Gas Industry in Sub-Saharan Africa.Kimberly Reeve & Dami Kabiawu - 2020 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 31:100-111.
    The oil and gas industry is viewed as controversial because of its adverse impacts on the environment. This study draws on legitimacy theory to analyze how CSR factors correlate with an increase or decrease in stock prices from 2006 – 2019.
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  32. Sustaining Cameroon’s Exotic Wood Species.Bryan M. Robinson, Bennett Cherry & Catalin Ratiu - 2020 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 31:112-119.
    Bob Taylor of US based Taylor Guitars tells a story, on YouTube, of the felling of 10 endangered ebony trees in Cameroon to find one with jet-black ebony – the remaining nine were left to rot. The story continues: Bob Taylor decided to purchase all the ebony, even that regarded as b-grade ‘streaked-ebony’ and incorporate the wood in guitar fretboards. Taylor Guitars used social media to communicate the environmental rationale behind the incorporation of streaked-ebony in the fretboards, and in so (...)
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  33. Assessment of Ibn Haldun's Model for Sustainability Using Structural Equation Modelling.Sümeyye Kuşakcı - 2020 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 31:64-76.
    This work firstly aims to develop a sustainability model based on Ibn Haldun’s teaching of sustainability. Religious coloring refers to the spirituality, which is re-discovered in modern ages and transferred to the workplace. Spirituality stimulates virtuousness at personal and organizational level, which in turn generates managerial sustainability meaning the lifespan of a company. While personal virtuousness refers social ethics, organizational level virtuousness could be considered as Corporate Social Responsibility. Secondly, it attempts to evaluate the relevance of Ibn Haldun’s approach to (...)
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  34. Inventing Regenerative Sustainability.Saeed Rahman, Stefano Pogutz & Monika Winn - 2020 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 31:89-99.
    Despite growing engagement by business practitioners in regenerative sustainability, there is little research into what factors contribute to its successful implementation. This paper offers first steps to close that gap. It examines theoretical foundations of and proposes empirical research for studying such innovative business practices. Our literature review draws on research in natural sciences, organization and management studies, corporate sustainability, and business strategy to theoretically define regenerative sustainability, explore how adopting principles of regeneration can help firms achieve “true business sustainability”, (...)
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  35. The Benefits of Benefit Forms.Caddie Putnam Rankin - 2020 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 31:77-88.
    This article explores adoption rates of B Corps certification and Benefit Corporation incorporation in order to discuss what benefits exist for organizations to adopt sustainable business forms. The analysis of the data identifies states with low and high adoption rates. The study is based on historical analysis of 4686 incorporated Benefit Corporations from 2007 to 2016 and 837 certified B Corps during the same time period. Patterns of adoption are identified and states with high and low adoption rates are categorized, (...)
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  36. Governance of Voice in Digital Platforms.Hussein Fadlallah & Robert A. Phillips - 2020 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 31:24-36.
    We study the governance of voice in digital platforms in light of contestations and struggles over meaning and resources among their stakeholders. In particular, we argue that social media platforms as fields are subject to power imbalances that might constrain the voices of marginalized and under-represented individuals and groups. Consequently, the governance decisions that private firms undertake are critical in providing users and communities with the capacity to self-present and identify. Through a qualitative longitudinal study of a popular social media (...)
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  37. Communities in Management.Andreas Georgiou & Daniel Arenas - 2020 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 31:37-49.
    Communities are discussed frequently in the business and management literature, but their main characteristics are not commonly agreed upon. This multiplicity of meanings results in vagueness, which hinders both scholarly research and practice. Building on a sample of 142 papers published in highly ranked business and management journals, this literature review aims to provide clarity on the concept by identifying its main underlying meanings. After conducting qualitative and cluster analysis Keyon the abovementioned sample, we suggest the following four types of (...)
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  38. A Theory of Entrepreneurship and Peacebuilding.Jay Joseph & Harry Van Buren Iii - 2020 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 31:50-63.
    Conflict Zone Entrepreneurs include local businesses operating in conflict settings, which represent the dominant form of employment in poverty-conflict scenarios, often hosting the most vulnerable in society who live on the poverty line. Despite their importance in the peacebuilding equation, little is known about their role in the peacebuilding process, with a variety of ad hoc contributions from assorted fields often assuming peacebuilding links with entrepreneurship, with little empiricism to support these claims. Consolidating prior works, the paper appropriately positions entrepreneurship (...)
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  39. Democracy, Legitimacy, and the Standing of the Corporation in Corporate Global Governance.Rob Barlow - 2020 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 31:1-13.
    Political CSR scholars have sought to apply the concept of deliberative democracy to the practice of global corporate engagement with stakeholders. Recently, much of this work has focused on the conditions under which the decisions made within multi-stakeholder initiatives should be considered democratically legitimate while relatively less attention has been paid to the practical benefits that such engagements can bring for their effectiveness when properly structured. The arguments in this essay support a shift in focus away from the former and (...)
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  40. Banking for a Low Carbon Future.Anna Eckardt & Diana D. Mazutis - 2020 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 31:14-23.
    We present a qualitative comparative case study of four European banks, investigating mechanisms that help or hinder the integration of climate change considerations in the banks’ corporate strategies. We find that strategic CC responses are dependent on the following factors: the initial interpretation of the CC issue, the language deployed to advocate for CC and the governance structures that are being invoked to spread attention to CC both within the bank and to external constituents. We contribute to research on corporate (...)
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  41. Francisco de Vitoria on the Right to Free Trade and Justice.Alejo José G. Sison & Dulce M. Redín - forthcoming - Business Ethics Quarterly:1-17.
    In 1538–39 Francisco de Vitoria delivered two relections: De Indis and De iure belli. This article distills from these writings the topic of free trade as a “human right” in accordance with ius gentium or the “law of peoples.” The right to free trade is rooted in a more fundamental right to communication and association. The rights to travel, to dwell, and to migrate precede the right to trade, which is also closely connected to the rights to preach, to protect (...)
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  42. Antagonism to Protagonism: Tracing the Historical Contours of Legalization in an Emerging Industry.Shalini Bhawal & Manjula S. Salimath - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics.
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  43. Dealing with Ethical Dilemmas: A Look at Financial Reporting by Firms Facing Product Harm Crises.Shafu Zhang, Like Jiang, Michel Magnan & Lixin Nancy Su - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):497-518.
    A product harm crisis undermines a firm’s reputation as well as its managers’ career outlook. To shake off the stigmatization resulting from the PHC and regain a firm’s legitimacy among stakeholders, managers usually face an ethical dilemma as they choose to be transparent about the crisis’ financial implications or to obfuscate them to neutralize the negative impact of the PHC. We find evidence that managers engage in income-increasing earnings management when their firms experience PHCs. Moreover, while income-increasing earnings management in (...)
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  44. Does A Trusted Leader Always Behave Better? The Relationship Between Leader Feeling Trusted by Employees and Benevolent and Laissez-Faire Leadership Behaviors.Xingwen Chen, Zheng Zhu & Jun Liu - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):615-634.
    The concept of _feeling trusted_, which has received far less attention from researchers than _trusting_, refers to the trustee’s awareness of trustor’s exposed vulnerability and positive expectations. Previous research has merely centered on employees’ feeling of being trusted by their leaders and its influences on their work-related outcomes, but there is little work about the impact of leader feeling trusted by employees. Grounded in social exchange theory and moral licensing theory, the current research centers on explaining why leaders’ sense of (...)
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  45. Corporate Social Responsibility and Financial Fraud: The Moderating Effects of Governance and Religiosity.Xing Li, Jeong-Bon Kim, Haibin Wu & Yangxin Yu - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):557-576.
    This study investigates how managers in firms that have committed fraud strategically use socially responsible activities in coordination with their fraudulent financial reporting practices. Using propensity score matching to select control firms that have a similar probability of fraud in the pre-fraud benchmark period, we find that the corporate social responsibility performance of fraudulent firms in the fraud-committing period is significantly higher compared with the CSR performance of non-fraudulent control firms during this period, and compared with that during their own (...)
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  46. The Effects of Immigration on Labour Tax Avoidance: An Empirical Spatial Analysis.Diego Ravenda, Maika M. Valencia-Silva, Josep M. Argiles-Bosch & Josep García-Blandón - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):471-496.
    We investigate whether the geographic concentration of non-EU immigrants in the various Italian provinces affects labour tax avoidance practices adopted by firms located in the same provinces, as well as in the neighbouring provinces, and operating in construction and agriculture industries that mostly employ immigrants in Italy. For this purpose, we develop a LTAV proxy based on the financial accounting information of a sample of 993,606 firm-years, disseminated throughout the 108 Italian provinces, over the period 2008–2016. Our results, based on (...)
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  47. A Normative Meaning of Meaningful Work.Christopher Michaelson - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):413-428.
    Research on meaningful work has not embraced a shared definition of what it is, in part because many researchers and laypersons agree that it means different things to different people. However, subjective and social accounts of meaningful work have limited practical value to help people pursue it and to help scholars study it. The account of meaningful work advanced in this paper is inherently normative. It recognizes the relevance of subjective experience and social agreement to appraisals of meaningfulness but considers (...)
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  48. Are Politically Endorsed Firms More Socially Responsible? Selective Engagement in Corporate Social Responsibility.Xiaowei Rose Luo & Danqing Wang - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):535-555.
    The state plays a major role in corporate social responsibility in emerging and transitional economies and often influences firms through political connection, and hence knowing how firms respond to the state’s CSR initiatives can inform policy making and has important implication on the sustainability of society and environment. However, existent studies show conflicting results on politically connected firms’ CSR participation. We examine the relationship between political endorsement and firms’ engagement in different types of CSR simultaneously. Using a representative sample of (...)
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  49. Does It Pay to Invest in Japanese Women? Evidence From the MSCI Japan Empowering Women Index.Jonathan Peillex, Sabri Boubaker & Breeda Comyns - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):595-613.
    In Japan, income, authority, and prestige are unequally distributed between men and women, even if they share the same occupational level. These inequalities are perceived as an ethical issue because they go against the principle of equal treatment at work. Nowadays, Japanese companies are under growing political and regulatory pressure to increase the hiring, promotion, and empowerment of female employees. In this context, the first equity index that tracks the financial performance of the best Japanese companies in terms of gender (...)
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  50. Not All Followers Socially Learn from Ethical Leaders: The Roles of Followers’ Moral Identity and Leader Identification in the Ethical Leadership Process.Zhen Wang, Lu Xing, Haoying Xu & Sean T. Hannah - 2021 - Journal of Business Ethics 170 (3):449-469.
    Recent literature suggests that ethical leadership helps to inhibit followers’ unethical behavior, largely built on the premise that followers view ethical leaders as ethical role models and socially learn from them, thereby engaging in more ethical conduct. This premise, however, has not been adequately tested, leaving insufficient understanding concerning the conditions under which this social learning process occurs. In this study, we revisit this premise, theorizing that not all followers will equally regard the same ethical leader as being a personal (...)
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