Business Ethics

Edited by Joakim Sandberg (University of Gothenburg)
About this topic
Summary Business ethics is the application of ethical theories and concepts to activity within and between commercial enterprises, and between commercial enterprises and their broader environment. It is a wide range of activity, and no brief list can be made of the issues it raises. The safety of working practices; the fairness of recruitment; the transparency of financial accounting; the promptness of payments to suppliers; the degree of permissible aggression between competitors: all come within the range of the subject. So do relations between businesses and consumers, local communities, national governments, and ecosystems. Many, but not all, of these issues can be understood to bear on distinct, recognized groups with their own stakes in a business: employees, shareholders, consumers, and so on. A central question concerns how businesses ought to weigh the interests of different stakeholders against each other; particularly what moral import to give to profit-making (presumably in the interest of shareholders in large corporations).
Key works Much of business ethics starts from Milton Friedman's provocative article "The Social Responsibility of Business is to Increase Profits" (reprinted in Snoeyenbos et al 2001, Jennings 2002, ...). Some well-cited expressions of alternative views are Freeman 1994...
Introductions Some introductions by Snoeyenbos et al 2001, Shaw 2002.
Related categories
Subcategories:

22597 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 22597
Material to categorize
  1. Managerial Discretion, Market Failure and Democracy.Michael Bennett - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    Managers often have discretion in interpreting their ethical requirements, and they should seek democratic guidance in doing so. The undemocratic nature of managerial ethical discretion is shown to be a recurring problem in business ethics. Joseph Heath’s market failures approach is introduced as a theory better positioned to deal with this problem than other views. However, due to epistemic uncertainty and conceptual indeterminacy, the MFA is shown to allow a much wider range of managerial discretion than initially appears. The paper (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Philosophy and Business Ethics: Organizations, CSR, and Moral Practice.Guglielmo Faldetta, Edoardo Mollona & Massimiliano M. Pellegrini (eds.) - 2022
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Looking Good in the Eyes of Stakeholders: Corporate Giving and Corporate Acquisitions.Yongqiang Gao, Miaohan Zhang & Haibin Yang - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-22.
    In this study we examine how a firm’s corporate philanthropic behavior may affect its subsequent acquisitions. Drawing upon stakeholder theory, we argue that firms may strategically use philanthropic donations to obtain support or approval from stakeholders so as to advance subsequent acquisitions, suggesting a positive relationship between corporate giving and corporate acquisitions in terms of both acquisition number and value. We further contend that stakeholders’ support for acquisitions would be even more critical for firms with negative or conservative attitudes to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Governing Corporate Social Responsibility Decoupling: The Effect of the Governance Committee on Corporate Social Responsibility Decoupling.Ammar Ali Gull, Nazim Hussain, Sana Akbar Khan, Zaheer Khan & Asif Saeed - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-26.
    This paper presents an examination of the relationship between the presence and composition of a corporate social responsibility committee on the corporate governance board and CSR decoupling. Using a sample of listed firms drawn from 41 countries, we found that the presence of a CSR committee on the corporate board is negatively associated with CSR decoupling. We also noted that the nature of the industry to which a firm belongs, a firm's level of CSR orientation, and corporate governance quality strengthen (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. The Association of Female Leaders with Donations and Operating Margin in Nonprofit Organizations.Veena L. Brown & Erica E. Harris - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-21.
    We examine the impact of employing a female, versus a male, leader on future donations and operating margin using a sample of 4387 unique nonprofit organizations between 2011 and 2014. Using two-stage and matched sample designs, we find that NPOs headed by female leaders report higher future operating margins but lower future donations. We interpret these findings to mean that female leaders are more focused on fiscal responsibility than fundraising. We also find that female leaders with past fundraising experience attenuate (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Accounting for Plural Cognitive Framings of Growth and Sustainability: Rethinking Management Education in Latin America.Maria Jose Murcia & Pilar Acosta - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    This paper surveys future managers’ cognitive framings of interconnected concerns for economic growth, social prosperity, and the natural environment across six countries in Latin America, and elaborates on implications for sustainability management education. Our cluster analysis unveils three cognitive types. Our findings show that whereas some future managers exhibit a ‘business case’ cognitive frame, prioritizing economic growth over the environment, the other two clusters of participants show signs of cognitive dissonance with some of the tenets of the current growth paradigm (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Three Paths to Feeling Just: How Managers Grapple with Justice Conundrums During Organizational Change.Julia Zwank, Marjo-Riitta Diehl & Marion Fortin - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    Managers tasked with organizational change often face irreconcilable demands on how to enact justice—situations we call justice conundrums. Drawing on interviews held with managers before and after a planned large-scale change, we identify specific conundrums and illustrate how managers grapple with these through three prototypical paths. Among our participants, the paths increasingly diverged over time, culminating in distinct career decisions. Based on our findings, we develop an integrative process model that illustrates how managers grapple with justice conundrums. Our contributions are (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Particularizing Nonhuman Nature in Stakeholder Theory: The Recognition Approach.Teea Kortetmäki, Anna Heikkinen & Ari Jokinen - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    Stakeholder theory has grown into one of the most frequent approaches to organizational sustainability. Stakeholder research has provided considerable insight on organization–nature relations, and advanced approaches that consider the intrinsic value of nonhuman nature. However, nonhuman nature is typically approached as an ambiguous, unified entity. Taking nonhumans adequately into account requires greater detail for both grounding the status of nonhumans and particularizing nonhuman entities as a set of potential organizational stakeholders with different characteristics, vulnerabilities, and needs. We utilize the philosophical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Free Markets and Public Interests in the Pharmaceutical Industry: A Comparative Analysis of Catholic and Reformational Critiques of Neoliberal Thought.Mathilde Oosterhuis-Blok & Johan Graafland - forthcoming - Business Ethics Quarterly:1-28.
    The rise of liberal market economies, propagated by neoliberal free market thought, has created a vacant responsibility for public interests in the market order of society. This development has been critiqued by Catholic social teaching, forcefully arguing that governments and businesses should be directed to the common good. In this debate, no attention has yet been given to the Reformational tradition and its principle of sphere sovereignty, which provides guidelines on the responsibilities of governments and companies for the public interest (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Taylor-Ing Ethics: Implications of Charles Taylor’s Work of Retrieval on Moral Foundations Theory.Carolyn T. Dang - forthcoming - Business Ethics Quarterly:1-27.
    This article draws from Charles Taylor’s work of retrieval to advance moral foundations theory. Taylor’s contribution to MFT lies in his insistence that we retrieve the moral sources that have helped constitute, substantiate, and give meaning to individuals’ moral sensibilities. Applying Taylor’s insights to MFT, this article seeks to advance a view of moral foundations that connects them more explicitly to their underlying moral sources. Using this retrieved account of moral foundations, this article then addresses current issues within moral foundations (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Exploring and Expanding Supererogatory Acts: Beyond Duty for a Sustainable Future.Gareth R. T. White, Anthony Samuel & Robert J. Thomas - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-24.
    Supererogation has gained attention as a means of explaining the voluntary behaviours of individuals and organizations that are done for the benefit of others and which go above what is required of legislation and what may be expected by society. Whilst the emerging literature has made some significant headway in exploring supererogation as an ethical lens for the study of business there remain several important issues that require attention. These comprise, the lack of primary evidence upon which such examinations have (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. How do Russian National Systems of Institutional Absences Shape Insensitive Corporate Environmental Violence of a Russian Extractive Multinational Corporation?Sofia Villo & Natalya Turkina - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-17.
    Aiming to develop normative recommendations for preventing corporate irresponsibility, business and society scholars have adopted strategic approaches—exploring the causal links between corporate social responsibility and profitability—and moral approaches—exploring the moral principles of CSR that guide managers. However, some business ethics scholars have recently argued that these studies are too simplistic as they disregard the systemic logics of broader institutional environments that generate ‘bad apples’ firms and managers. Drawing on literature that sheds light on the systemic origin of CiR, we conduct (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. What an Ethics Management Program Cannot Sufficiently Address in an African Context.Elme Vivier, Mollie Painter, Gideon Pogrund & Kerrin Myres - forthcoming - Business and Professional Ethics Journal.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Dissensus and Deadlock in the Evolution of Labour Governance: Global Supply Chains and the International Labour Organization.Huw Thomas & Mark Anner - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-17.
    Global supply chains present the International Labour Organization with a challenge that goes to the heart of its founding mandate and structure, one built on the prominence of nation states and national representatives of employers and workers. In February 2020, discussions in the ILO on the rise of GSCs reached deadlock. To fully understand why the ILO has been unable to address decent work deficits in GSCs greater attention needs to be paid to contestation, power and legitimacy in the deliberation (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. The Impact of Work-Related Use of Information and Communication Technologies After Hours on Time Theft.Chenqian Xu, Zhu Yao & Zhengde Xiong - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-14.
    Time theft is a prevalent, costly, and generally discreet employee activity in firms; nonetheless, very limited research is available on it. To explore why, how, and when employees exhibit time theft, we investigate the influence mechanism of work-related use of information and communication technologies after hours on time theft from the perspective of resource gain and loss. Our study found that W_ICTs significantly promotes employee time theft. Emotional exhaustion and moral disengagement play a mediating role in the relationship between W_ICTs (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. Sweatshops, Exploitation, and the Nonworseness Claim.Michael Kates - forthcoming - Business Ethics Quarterly:1-22.
    According to the nonworseness claim, it cannot be morally worse to exploit someone than not to interact with them at all when the interaction 1) is mutually beneficial, 2) is voluntary, and 3) has no negative effects on third parties. My aim in this article is to defend the moral significance of exploitation from this challenge. To that end, I develop a novel account of why sweatshop owners have a moral obligation to pay sweatshop workers a nonexploitative wage despite the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Relational Economy.Sara Mandray - forthcoming - Business and Professional Ethics Journal.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Benefit Corporations in the U.S.Irina M. Kopaneva - forthcoming - Business and Professional Ethics Journal.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Ethical Perceptions of AI in Hiring and Organizational Trust: The Role of Performance Expectancy and Social Influence.Maria Figueroa-Armijos, Brent B. Clark & Serge P. da Motta Veiga - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-19.
    The use of artificial intelligence in hiring entails vast ethical challenges. As such, using an ethical lens to study this phenomenon is to better understand whether and how AI matters in hiring. In this paper, we examine whether ethical perceptions of using AI in the hiring process influence individuals’ trust in the organizations that use it. Building on the organizational trust model and the unified theory of acceptance and use of technology, we explore whether ethical perceptions are shaped by individual (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Manipulation, Injustice, and Technology.Michael Klenk - 2022 - In Fleur Jongepier & Michael Klenk (eds.), The Philosophy of Online Manipulation. New York: Routledge. pp. 108-131.
    This chapter defends the view that manipulated behaviour is explained by an injustice. Injustices that explain manipulated behaviour need not involve agential features such as intentionality. Therefore, technology can manipulate us, even if technological artefacts like robots, intelligent software agents, or other ‘mere tools’ lack agential features such as intentionality. The chapter thus sketches a comprehensive account of manipulated behaviour related to but distinct from existing accounts of manipulative behaviour. It then builds on that account to defend the possibility that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  21. Elections and CSR Engagement: International Evidence.Bryan W. Husted & Walid Saffar - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-24.
    Using a large panel of elections in 44 countries, we show that national elections affect CSR in contrasting ways. We posit and find that in strong institutional environments CSR engagement responds negatively to uncertainty and decreases during election periods relative to non-election periods. However, in the context of institutional weakness, characterized by incomplete and captured national institutions, we find that CSR engagement increases in electoral periods, consistent with rent-seeking behavior. We discuss the implications of these results for both theory and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Organizational Event Stigma: Typology, Processes, and Stickiness.Kim Clark & Yuan Li - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    What do events such as scandals, industrial accidents, activist threats, and mass shootings have in common? They can all trigger an audience’s stigma judgment about the organization involved in the event. Despite the prevalence of these stigma-triggering events, management research has provided little conceptual work to characterize the dimensions and processes of organizational event stigma. This article takes the perspective of the evaluating audience to unpack the stigma judgment process, identify critical dimensions for categorizing types of event stigma, and explore (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Assessing the Legitimacy of Corporate Political Activity: Uber and the Quest for Responsible Innovation.Gastón de los Reyes & Markus Scholz - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-19.
    Building on literature in political CSR and corporate political activity as well as responsible innovation and responsible lobbying, we introduce a framework to assess the legitimacy status of corporate political activity. We focus on the fact that companies frequently face sharp regulatory backlash after penetrating markets with their innovations. In response to regulatory backlash, big tech companies often employ an arsenal of corporate political activities to shape national and local regulatory environments, which raises the important questions about the legitimacy of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. The Philosophy of Online Manipulation.Michael Klenk & Fleur Jongepier (eds.) - 2022 - Routledge.
    Are we being manipulated online? If so, is being manipulated by online technologies and algorithmic systems notably different from human forms of manipulation? And what is under threat exactly when people are manipulated online? This volume provides philosophical and conceptual depth to debates in digital ethics about online manipulation. The contributions explore the ramifications of our increasingly consequential interactions with online technologies such as online recommender systems, social media, user-friendly design, micro-targeting, default-settings, gamification, and real-time profiling. The authors in this (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Rank Has Its Privileges: Explaining Why Laboratory Safety Is a Persistent Challenge.Gokce Basbug, Ayn Cavicchi & Susan S. Silbey - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-17.
    Environmental, health, and safety management systems have become common in research settings to improve laboratory safety through systematic observation and self-regulation. However, there is scant empirical evidence assessing whether these surveillance and inspection systems meet their intended objectives. Using data from safety inspections in research laboratories at a large university, we investigate whether conducting inspections, and recording and reporting findings back to the formally responsible actors lead to the improvement of regulatory compliance. Our analyses identify a population of well-funded, high-status, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. In the Club? How Categorization and Contact Impact the Board Gender Diversity-Firm Performance Relationship.Andre Havrylyshyn, Donald J. Schepker & Anthony J. Nyberg - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-22.
    Meta-analytic results show that board gender diversity is modestly associated with firm performance, but there is notable heterogeneity among findings. Board gender diversity allows access to women’s perspectives, potentially helping boards, but diversity can also trigger biases that exclude women directors, such that boards do not integrate meaningful perspectives. Addressing this problem, we leverage the categorization-elaboration model, contact theory, and critical mass theory to build new theory as to how men directors can serve as allies to women directors to better (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Do Corporate Customers Prefer Socially Responsible Suppliers? An Instrumental Stakeholder Theory Perspective.Ran Tao, Jian Wu & Hong Zhao - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-24.
    This paper studies the way supplier firms’ corporate social responsibility affects their likelihood of being selected as new suppliers. Using a large sample of US public firms with detailed supply chain and CSR data, we provide empirical evidence that corporate customers prefer socially responsible suppliers, and that the effect is more prominent when the supplier industry is more competitive, the customer’s own CSR performance is better, or the supplier and the customer have more similar CSR focuses. Our paper contributes to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Who Cares More About the Environment, Those with an Intrinsic, an Extrinsic, a Quest, or an Atheistic Religious Orientation?: Investigating the Effect of Religious Ad Appeals on Attitudes Toward the Environment.Denni Arli, Patrick van Esch & Yuanyuan Cui - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-22.
    There is a consensus among scientists that climate change is an existing, growing, and human-made threat to our planet. The topic is a divisive issue worldwide, including among people of faith. Little research has focused on the relationship between religious belief and climate change. Hence, in Studies 1 and 2, the authors explore the impact of religious/non-religious orientations: intrinsic, extrinsic, quest, and non-religious orientation on consumer attitudes toward the environment, focusing on recycling advertisements with religious cues. Further, in Study 3, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. What Makes a Good Diversity Manager?Thomas Köllen - forthcoming - Business and Professional Ethics Journal.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Ethical Sensemaking in Impact Investing: Reasons and Motives in the Chinese Renewable Energy Sector.Tongyu Meng, Jamie Newth & Christine Woods - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-27.
    This article explores impact investing within the renewable energy sector. Drawing on ethical decision making and sensemaking, this article contributes to an enhanced understanding of the complex ethical sensemaking process of impact investors when facing plausible situations in a world of contested truths. Addressing the ethical tensions faced by impact investors with mixed motives, this study investigates the way decision makers use context-specific reasons to make sense of and shape the renewable energy investment process. This represents an initial attempt to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Beyond Rational Persuasion: How Leaders Change Moral Norms.Charles Spinosa, Matthew Hancocks, Haridimos Tsoukas & Billy Glennon - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-15.
    Scholars are increasingly examining how formal leaders of organizations change moral norms. The prominent accounts over-emphasize the role of rational persuasion. We focus, instead, on how formal leaders successfully break and thereby create moral norms. We draw on Dreyfus’s ontology of cultural paradigms and Williams’s moral luck to develop our framework for viewing leader-driven radical norm the change. We argue that formal leaders, embedded in their practices’ grounding, clarifying, and organizing norms, get captivated by anomalies and respond to them by (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Can Job Stressors Activate Amoral Manipulation? A Weekly Diary Study.Gloria Xiaocheng Ma, Paraskevas Petrou, Arnold B. Bakker & Marise Ph Born - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-16.
    This study investigates whether job stressors such as role ambiguity, procedural unfairness, and perceived competition may prompt high Machiavellian employees to use amoral manipulation at work. We also examine whether these manipulative behaviors are consequently related to their own task performance and affiliative citizenship behaviors. A weekly diary study was conducted among 111 Dutch employees over five consecutive working weeks, resulting in 446 assessed occasions. Using a multilevel moderated mediation model, we found that the relationship between weekly job stressors and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Doing Well and Doing Good: How Responsible Entrepreneurship Shapes Female Entrepreneurial Success.Xuemei Xie & Yonghui Wu - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):803-828.
    This study examines the role of responsible entrepreneurship among female entrepreneurs by examining how and when responsible entrepreneurship may exert a positive influence on female entrepreneurial success. Using the data collected from 337 Chinese female entrepreneurs, and by integrating responsible entrepreneurship research with a dynamic capability framework, our findings show, firstly, that responsible entrepreneurship is positively correlated to female entrepreneurial success; secondly, this relationship is mediated by female entrepreneurs’ opportunity recognition; and thirdly, the indirect effect of responsible entrepreneurship on female (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. How Human–Chatbot Interaction Impairs Charitable Giving: The Role of Moral Judgment.Yuanyuan Zhou, Zhuoying Fei, Yuanqiong He & Zhilin Yang - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):849-865.
    Interactions between human beings and chatbots are gradually becoming part of our everyday social lives. It is still unclear how human–chatbot interactions, compared to human–human interactions, influence individual morality. Building on the dual-process theory of moral judgment, a secondary data analysis, and two scenario-based experiments provide sufficient evidence that HCIs support utilitarian judgments, which reduce participants' donation amount. Study 3 further demonstrates that the negative effects of HCIs can be attenuated by inducing a social-oriented communication style in chatbots’ verbal language (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Power Imbalance and the Dark Side of the Captive Agri-Food Supplier–Buyer Relationship.Richard Glavee-Geo, Per Engelseth & Arnt Buvik - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):609-628.
    This paper highlights the dark side of power imbalance regarding its consequences in agri-food supplier–buyer relationships. We report on findings from two studies. The first study is based on a sample of 105 key informants, while study 2 is based on a sample of 444 key informants, all from the cocoa agri-food supply market of Ghana. While the first study focuses on the antecedents of power imbalance and its consequences, the second study explores the role of cooperatives/collective action in minimizing (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  36. Making Sense of Stigmatized Organizations: Labelling Contests and Power Dynamics in Social Evaluation Processes.Gro Kvåle & Zuzana Murdoch - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):675-693.
    How do social audiences negotiate and handle stigmatized organizations? What role do their heterogenous values, norms and power play in this process? Addressing these questions is important from a business ethics perspective to improve our understanding of the ethical standards against which organizations are judged as well as the involved prosecutorial incentives. Moreover, it illuminates ethical concerns about when and how power imbalances may induce inequity in the burdens imposed by such social evaluations. We address these questions building on two (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Corporate Accountability Towards Species Extinction Protection: Insights from Ecologically Forward-Thinking Companies.Lee Roberts, Monomita Nandy, Abeer Hassan, Suman Lodh & Ahmed A. Elamer - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):571-595.
    This paper contributes to biodiversity and species extinction literature by examining the relationship between corporate accountability in terms of species protection and factors affecting such accountability from forward-thinking companies. We use triangulation of theories, namely deep ecology, legitimacy, and we introduce a new perspective to the stakeholder theory that considers species as a ‘stakeholder’. Using Poisson pseudo-maximum likelihood regression, we examine a sample of 200 Fortune Global companies over 3 years. Our results indicate significant positive relations between ecologically conscious companies (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. Attuned HRM Systems for Social Enterprises.Silvia Dorado, Ying Chen, Andrea M. Prado & Virginia Simon - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):829-848.
    This paper is motivated by a puzzling observation made when conducting a case study of ProCredit, a well-known social bank. The HR practices that this social enterprise adopted to cultivate mission identification were unfavorably impacting its retention rate. Building on prior research and our analysis of the case, we argue the need for SEs to embrace HRM systems that are both mission-identification proactive and employee-retention preemptive. It theorizes that these HRM systems should be attuned to the labor market conditions that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  39. Law Lost, Compliance Found: A Frontline Understanding of the Non-linear Nature of Business and Employee Responses to Law.Na Li & Benjamin van Rooij - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):715-734.
    This paper seeks to understand the transmission and reception of legal rules as a component of the regulatory compliance process. It adopts a frontline approach to regulatory compliance that traces the grassroot functioning of compliance processes from regulator, to compliance managers to individual employees. Through a multilevel and multi-sited ethnography of worker safety protection in Chinese construction industry, this paper shows that in the cases studied there is a fundamental disconnect in the transmission and reception of law from regulator to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Changes in Corporate Social Responsibility and Stock Performance.Hui-Ju Tsai & Yangru Wu - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):735-755.
    We study the relationship between corporate social performance and financial performance by comparing the portfolio returns of firms with changes in corporate social responsibility intensity. Using an extensive US sample from the MSCI ESG database, we find that improvement in the overall CSR is generally value enhancing. The relationship varies with CSR dimensions. More importantly, the relationship shifts differently for various CSR dimensions during the crisis period when trust in the society is low and financial resource is limited. Improvement in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Deliberating Our Frames: How Members of Multi-Stakeholder Initiatives Use Shared Frames to Tackle Within-Frame Conflicts Over Sustainability Issues.Angelika Zimmermann, Nora Albers & Jasper O. Kenter - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):757-782.
    Multi-stakeholder initiatives have been praised as vehicles for tackling complex sustainability issues, but their success relies on the reconciliation of stakeholders’ divergent perspectives. We yet lack a thorough understanding of the micro-level mechanisms by which stakeholders can deal with these differences. To develop such understanding, we examine what frames—i.e., mental schemata for making sense of the world—members of MSIs use during their discussions on sustainability questions and how these frames are deliberated through social interactions. Whilst prior framing research has focussed (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. Too Good To Be True: Influencing Credibility Perceptions with Signaling Reference Explicitness and Assurance Depth.Carolin Baier, Max Göttsche, Andreas Hellmann & Frank Schiemann - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):695-714.
    We investigate how the selection of assurance topics and the format of their communication influence the credibility perception of sustainability report readers. This is important because misleading communication may discredit ethical sustainability assurance practices. Based on signaling theory and using an experimental approach, we are the first to examine false credibility signals in the context of sustainability assurance. We find that two variables related to sustainability assurance, reference explicitness and assurance depth, jointly influence the assurance signal and the perceived credibility (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Ethics, Economics, and the Specter of Naturalism: The Enduring Relevance of the Harmony Doctrine School of Economics.Andrew Lynn - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):661-673.
    This article revisits the "harmony doctrine" school of economics and its distinctive understanding of how ethics and economics intersect. Harmony doctrine thinkers staked out a “natural” understanding of economic phenomena that in many ways fused the classical political economy of Adam Smith with the earlier French Physiocratic School. Their metaphysically grounded interpretation was largely eclipsed by the developments of utilitarian and marginalist schools by the end of the nineteenth century. Yet harmony doctrine thinking adhered to a distinct understanding of how (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Antagonism to Protagonism: Tracing the Historical Contours of Legalization in an Emerging Industry.Shalini Bhawal & Manjula S. Salimath - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):783-801.
    We explore the legalization of the cannabis industry in the US, and point at the conflicted path through which this emerging industry has traversed. In particular, we highlight how this industry has navigated controversy to become one of the fastest growing industries in the world. The paper also offers a theoretical model that explains the role played by social movements to propel and shape early antagonism towards increasing protagonism. Evidence of the latter is seen in the form of cannabis laws (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Posthuman Affirmative Business Ethics: Reimagining Human–Animal Relations Through Speculative Fiction.Janet Sayers, Lydia Martin & Emma Bell - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):597-608.
    Posthuman affirmative ethics relies upon a fluid, nomadic conception of the ethical subject who develops affective, material and immaterial connections to multiple others. Our purpose in this paper is to consider what posthuman affirmative business ethics would look like, and to reflect on the shift in thinking and practice this would involve. The need for a revised understanding of human–animal relations in business ethics is amplified by crises such as climate change and pandemics that are related to ecologically destructive business (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  46. Ethical Work Climate 2.0: A Normative Reformulation of Victor and Cullen’s 1988 Framework.James Weber & Akwasi Opoku-Dakwa - 2022 - Journal of Business Ethics 178 (3):629-646.
    Ethical work climate, introduced by Bart Victor and John Cullen, plays a central role in the business ethics literature due to its influence on employee’s ethical decision-making. Yet, the often-used framework is limited as a descriptive and prescriptive model because it lacks a normative focus and does not allow for organizations guided by universal ethical principles. We revisit Victor and Cullen’s original conceptualization of ethical climate and propose a reformulation of the ethical criteria to be conceptually consistent with Kohlberg’s theory (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Framework for Assessing the Integration of Ethics in the Design of Impact Investment Ventures.Adenekan Dedeke - forthcoming - Business and Professional Ethics Journal.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. The Escalation of Organizational Moral Failure in Public Discourse: A Semiotic Analysis of Nokia’s Bochum Plant Closure.Lauri Wessel, Riku Ruotsalainen, Henri A. Schildt & Christopher Wickert - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-20.
    We examine the processes involved in the escalation of a plant closure from a local concern to a perceived organizational moral failure that commands national attention. Our empirical case covers the controversy over the decision of telecommunications giant Nokia to close a plant in Germany, despite having received significant state subsidies, and the relocation of production to Hungary and Romania. We conducted an inductive study that utilizes a semiotic analysis to identify how various actors framed the controversial plant closure and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Who Has a Seat at the Table in Impact Investing? Addressing Inequality by Giving Voice.Guillermo Casasnovas & Jessica Jones - forthcoming - Journal of Business Ethics:1-19.
    Despite recognizing the importance of impact investing in combating complex societal challenges, researchers have yet to examine the capacity of the field to address systemic inequality. While impact investments are intended to benefit vulnerable stakeholders, the voices of those stakeholders are generally overlooked in the design and implementation of such investments. To resolve this oversight, we theorize how the fields’ design—through its tools, organizations, and field-level bodies—influences its capacity to address inequality by focusing on the concept of giving voice, which (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. Collective Moral Agency and Self-Induced Moral Incapacity.Niels de Haan - forthcoming - Philosophical Explorations:1-22.
    Collective moral agents can cause their own moral incapacity. If an agent is morally incapacitated, then the agent is exempted from responsibility. Due to self-induced moral incapacity, corporate responsibility gaps resurface. To solve this problem, I first set out and defend a minimalist account of moral competence for group agents. After setting out how a collective agent can cause its own moral incapacity, I argue that self-induced temporary exempting conditions do not free an agent from diachronic responsibility once the agent (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 22597