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  1. Causality-Dependent Consciousness and Consciousness-Dependent Causality.David Leech Anderson - 2012 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 19 (5-6):5-6.
    This paper has two main goals. First, it asks whether causality is an adequate foundation for those theories of cognition and consciousness that are built upon it. The externalist revolution has reconceived all three dimensions of cognition -- the semantic, the epistemological, and the mental -- upon a foundation of 'causal connections of the appropriate type'. Yet, these new theories almost completely ignore the long-standing controversies surrounding the very nature of causality, and the very real threat that 'causality' may be (...)
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  2. Causal Idealism.Sara Bernstein - forthcoming - In Tyron Goldschmidt & Kenneth Pearce (eds.), Idealism: New Essays in Metaphysics. Oxford University Press.
    This paper argues that causal idealism, the view that causation is a product of mental activity, should be considered a competetitor to contemporary views that incorporate human thought and agency into the causal relation. Weighing contextualism, contrastivism, or pragmatism about causation against causal idealism results in at least a tie with respect to the virtues of these theories.
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  3. Causation: A Realist Approach. By Michael Tooley.Richard J. Blackwell - 1991 - Modern Schoolman 68 (3):267-269.
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  4. Causation and Universals, by Evan Fales. [REVIEW]John W. Carroll - 1992 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 52 (4):1001-1004.
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  5. Causal Realism: Events and Processes.Anjan Chakravartty - 2005 - Erkenntnis 63 (1):7-31.
    Minimally, causal realism (as understood here) is the view that accounts of causation in terms of mere, regular or probabilistic conjunction are unsatisfactory, and that causal phenomena are correctly associated with some form of de re necessity. Classic arguments, however, some of which date back to Sextus Empiricus and have appeared many times since, including famously in Russell, suggest that the very notion of causal realism is incoherent. In this paper I argue that if such objections seem compelling, it is (...)
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  6. How is Scientific Analysis Possible?Richard Corry - 2009 - In Toby Handfield (ed.), Dispositions and Causes. Oxford University Press, Clarendon Press ;.
    One of the most powerful tools in science is the analytic method, whereby we seek to understand complex systems by studying simpler sub-systems from which the complex is composed. If this method is to be successful, something about the sub-systems must remain invariant as we move from the relatively isolated conditions in which we study them, to the complex conditions in which we want to put our knowledge to use. This paper asks what this invariant could be. The paper shows (...)
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  7. Causal Realism and the Laws of Nature.Richard Corry - 2006 - Philosophy of Science 73 (3):261-276.
    This paper proposes a revision of our understanding of causation that is designed to address what Hartry Field has suggested is the central problem in the metaphysics of causation today: reconciling Bertrand Russell’s arguments that the concept of causation can play no role in the advanced sciences with Nancy Cartwright’s arguments that causal concepts are essential to a scientific understanding of the world. The paper shows that Russell’s main argument is, ironically, very similar to an argument that Cartwright has put (...)
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  8. Review of Mumford and Anjum, Getting Causes From Powers. [REVIEW]Troy Cross - forthcoming - Dialectica.
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  9. On the Nature and the Observability of the Causal Relation.Curt J. Ducasse - 1926 - Journal of Philosophy 23 (3):57-68.
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  10. On Causation: With Special Reference to Hume.Steven M. Duncan - manuscript
    Hume was correct in his critique of causation as understood by the New Science, a critique deadly to both causal and scientific realism. Getting beyond Hume's critique of causation requires that we call into question the New Science's understanding of causation and replace it with a Neo-Aristotelian account of causal processes. In this paper, I try to point the way to such an account.
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  11. A Universal and Absolute Spiritualism: Maine de Biran's Leibniz.Jeremy Dunham - forthcoming - In D. Meacham J. Spadola (ed.), The Relationship between the Physical and Moral in Man: The Philosophy of Maine de Biran. Bloomsbury Academic.
  12. "Causation: A Realist Approach" by Michael Tooley. [REVIEW]Evan Fales - 1990 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50 (3):605.
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  13. Causality, Contiguity, and Construction.Jan Faye - 2010 - Organon F: Medzinárodný Časopis Pre Analytickú Filozofiu 17 (4):443-460.
    The paper discusses the regularity account of causation but finds it insufficient as a complete account of our notion of causality. The attractiveness of the regularity account is its attempt to understand causation in terms of empirically accessible features of the world. However, this account does not match our intuition that singular causality is prior in normal epistemic situations and that there is more to causation than mere succession. Apart from succession and regularity, the concept of causality also contains a (...)
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  14. Michael Tooley, Causation: A Realist Approach. [REVIEW]James Fetzer - 1989 - Philosophy in Review 9:121-124.
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  15. Michael Tooley, Causation: A Realist Approach Reviewed By.James H. Fetzer - 1989 - Philosophy in Review 9 (3):121-124.
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  16. Introduction : Realism About Causality.Ruth Groff - 2008 - In Revitalizing Causality: Realism About Causality in Philosophy and Social Science. Routledge.
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  17. Meso-Level Objects, Powers, and Simultaneous Causation.Tobias Hansson Wahlberg - 2017 - Metaphysica 18.
    I argue that Mumford and Anjum’s recent theory of simultaneous causation among powerful meso-level objects is problematic in several respects: it is based on a false dichotomy, it is incompatible with standard meso-level physics, it is explanatory deficient, and it threatens to render the powers metaphysics incoherent. Powers theorists are advised, therefore, to adopt a purely sequential conception of causation.
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  18. Too Many Dispositional Properties.Tobias Hansson - 2006 - SATS: Northern European Journal of Philosophy 7 (2):37-42.
    This paper identifies an overdetermination problem faced by the non-reductive dispositional property account of disposition ascriptions. Two possible responses to the problem are evaluated and both are shown to have serious drawbacks. Finally it is noted that the traditional conditional analysis of dispositional ascriptions escapes the original difficulty.
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  19. Causal Production as Interaction.Rognvaldur Ingthorsson - 2002 - Metaphysica 3 (1):87-119.
    The paper contains a novel realist account of causal production and the necessary connection between cause and effect. I argue that the asymmetric relation between causally connected events must be regarded as a product of a symmetric interaction between two or more entities. All the entities involved contribute to the producing, and so count as parts of the cause, and they all suffer a change, and so count as parts of the effect. Cause and effect, on this account, are two (...)
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  20. Situation Mereology and the Logic of Causation.Robert C. Koons - 1999 - Topoi 18 (2):167-174.
  21. Tooley on Causation and Probabilities.Stephen Leeds - 2000 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 78 (2):223 – 230.
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  22. Does Causal Regularity Defy Chance?John Leslie - 1973 - Idealistic Studies 3 (3):277-284.
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  23. To Introduce Some Rather Ad Hoc Constraints on the Vectorial Representation of Causal Powers (Egp 38). The Authors Adopt the Vectorial Representation Because It is 'Suited to Dis-Play Many of the Features of a Dispositional Theory of Causation'(P. 20), and is Thus 'Amenable to a Dispositionalist Ontology'(P. 46). In Particular, They. [REVIEW]Are Liberty & Equality Compatible - 2012 - Mind 121 (483):484.
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  24. The Metaphysics of Forces.Olivier Massin - 2009 - Dialectica 63 (4):555-589.
    This paper defends the view that Newtonian forces are real, symmetrical and non-causal relations. First, I argue that Newtonian forces are real; second, that they are relations; third, that they are symmetrical relations; fourth, that they are not species of causation. The overall picture is anti-Humean to the extent that it defends the existence of forces as external relations irreducible to spatio-temporal ones, but is still compatible with Humean approaches to causation (and others) since it denies that forces are a (...)
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  25. In Defense of Realism.David John Mcgraw - 1993 - Dissertation, Wayne State University
    This essay develops and defends the idea that there is causal structure in the world. Specifically, the essay argues that there are ordinary observable objects only because there is causal structure. To say that there are such objects is to say that things cohere and endure as well as interact. Coherence and endurance are argued to be causal features of things. ;In order to maintain this thesis, causation is analyzed in terms of subjunctive dependency. On this basis, the claim is (...)
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  26. Hume, Causal Realism, and Free Will.Peter Millican - unknown
    My aim in this paper is to present what I consider to be the decisive objection against the ‘New Hume’ Causal realist interpretation of Hume, and to refute three recent attempts to answer this objection. I start in §1 with an outline of the ‘Old’ and ‘New’ interpretations. Then §2 sketches the traditional case in favour of the former, while §3 presents the decisive objection to the latter, based on Hume’s discussions of ‘Liberty and Necessity’ (i.e. free-will and determinism). In (...)
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  27. Hume, Causal Realism, and Free Will: The State of the Debate.Peter Millican - unknown
    all objects, which are found to be constantly conjoin’d, are upon that account only to be regarded as causes and effects. … the constant conjunction of objects constitutes the very essence of cause and effect … (T 1.4.5.32, my emphasis).
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  28. Causation: A Realist Approach.Adam Morton - 1989 - Philosophical Books 30 (3):157-161.
    a review of Tooley's Causation: a realist approach*, with emphasis on his use of probability and Ramsey sentences.
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  29. Powers, Dispositions, Properties or a Causal Realist Manifesto.Stephan Mumford - 2008 - In Ruth Groff (ed.), Revitalizing Causality: Realism About Causality in Philosophy and Social Science. Routledge. pp. 139--51.
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  30. Dispositional Modality.Stephen Mumford & Rani Lill Anjum - 2011 - In C. F. Gethmann (ed.), Lebenswelt und Wissenschaft, Deutsches Jahrbuch Philosophie 2. Meiner Verlag.
    There has been much discussion of powers or real dispositions in the past decade, but there remains an issue that has been inadequately treated. This concerns the precise modal value that comes with dispositionality. We contend in this paper that dispositionality involves a non-alethic, sui generis, irreducible modality. Dispositions only tend towards their manifestations; they do not necessitate them. Tendency is, of course, a dispositional term itself, so this last statement offers little by way of illumination. But given our thesis (...)
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  31. A Powerful Theory of Causation.Stephen Mumford & Rani Lill Anjum - 2010 - In Anna Marmodoro (ed.), The Metaphysics of Powers: Their Grounding and Their Manifestations. Routledge. pp. 143--159.
    Hume thought that if you believed in powers, you believed in necessary connections in nature. He was then able to argue that there were none such because anything could follow anything else. But Hume wrong-footed his opponents. A power does not necessitate its manifestations: rather, it disposes towards them in a way that is less than necessary but more than purely contingent. -/- In this paper a dispositional theory of causation is offered. Causes dispose towards their effects and often produce (...)
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  32. Can Indirect Causation Be Real?M. Gregory Oakes - 2007 - Metaphysica 8 (2):111-122.
    Causal realists maintain that the causal relation consists in something more than its relata. Specifying this relation in nonreductive terms is however notoriously difficult. Michael Tooley has advanced a plausible account avoiding some of the relation’s most obvious difficulties, particularly where these concern the notion of a cross-temporal connection. His account distinguishes discrete from nondiscrete causation, where the latter is suitable to the continuity of cross-temporal causation. I argue, however, that such accounts face conceptual difficulties dating from Zeno’s time. A (...)
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  33. Cause, Effect, and Fake Causation.Johannes Persson - 2002 - Synthese 131 (1):129 - 143.
    The possibility of apparently negative causation has been discussed in a number of recent works on causation, but the discussion has suffered from beingscattered. In this paper, the problem of apparently negative causation and its attemptedsolutions are examined in more detail. I discuss and discard three attempts that have beensuggested in the literature. My conclusion is negative: Negative causation shows that thetraditional cause & effect view is inadequate. A more unified causal perspective is needed.
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  34. The Metaphysics of Causality.David Mayers Robb - 1996 - Dissertation, Cornell University
    In this thesis I defend a realist theory of causality. At the core of the thesis is a distinction between two components of causality, the connection component and the modal component. The connection component is the "mechanism" that links causes with their effects. I argue that at the most basic level , causes and effects are connected by the transference, the literal persistence, of something from cause to effect . The modal component is the "force" of causal relations: it's in (...)
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  35. An Anti-Reductionist Account of Singular Causation.Michael Rota - 2009 - The Monist 92 (1):136--55.
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  36. A Realistic Account of Causation.W. Salmon - 2002 - In Michele Marsonet (ed.), The Problem of Realism. Ashgate. pp. 106--134.
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  37. On "Humean".Galen Strawson - 2013 - In Https://Www.Academia.Edu/. pp. 1–6.
    In metaphysics, the adjective ‘Humean’ is standardly used to describe positions that deny the existence of any necessary connection or causal influence in concrete reality. This usage has been significantly reinforced by David Lewis’s employment of ‘Humean’ in the phrase ‘Humean supervenience’. It is, however, most unclear that this usage is appropriate, and Lewis himself raised a doubt about it.
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  38. Realism and Causation.Galen Strawson - 1987 - Philosophical Quarterly 37 (148):253-277.
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  39. The Nature of Causation: A Singularist Account.Michael Tooley - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (sup1):271-322.
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  40. Causation: Reductionism Versus Realism.Michael Tooley - 1990 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 50:215-236.
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  41. The Nature of Causation.Michael Tooley - 1990 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 20 (Supplement):271-322.
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  42. Causation: A Realist Approach.Michael Tooley - 1987 - Oxford University Press.
    Tooley here sets out and defends realist accounts of traditional empiricist explanations of causation and laws of nature, arguing that since reductionist accounts of causation are exposed to decisive objections, empiricists must break with that tradition.
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  43. R. Harré and E. H. Madden, "Causal Powers". [REVIEW]William A. Wallace - 1976 - The Thomist 40 (4):692.
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  44. Consciousness and Causation in Whitehead's Phenomenology of Becoming.Anderson Weekes - 2009 - In Michel Weber & Anderson Weekes (eds.), Process Approaches to Consciousness in Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. aLBANY: State University of New York Press. pp. 407-461.
    The problem causation poses is: how can we ever know more than a Humean regularity. The problem consciousness poses is: how can subjective phenomenal experience arise from something lacking experience. A recent turn in the consciousness debates suggest that the hard problem of consciousness is nothing more than the Humean problem of explaining any causal nexus in an intelligible way. This involution of the problems invites comparison with the theories of Alfred North Whitehead, who also saw them related in this (...)
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  45. Causal Realism and the Limits of Empiricism: Some Unexpected Insights From Hegel.Kenneth R. Westphal - 2015 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 5 (2):281-317.
    The term ‘realism’ and its contrasting terms have various related senses, although often they occlude as much as they illuminate, especially if ontological and epistemological issues and their tenable combinations are insufficiently clarified. For example, in 1807 the infamous ‘idealist’ Hegel argued cogently that any tenable philosophical theory of knowledge must take the natural and social sciences into very close consideration, which he himself did. Here I argue that Hegel ably and insightfully defends Newton’s causal realism about gravitational force, in (...)
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  46. Supervenience and Singular Causal Statements.James Woodward - 1990 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Supplement 27:211-246.
    In his recent book, Causation: A Realistic Approach , Michael Tooley discusses the following thesis, which he calls the ‘thesis of the Humean Supervenience of Causal Relations’: The truth values of all singular causal statements are logically determined by the truth values of statements of causal laws, together with the truth values of non-causal statements about particulars . represents one version of the ‘Humean’ idea that there is no more factual content to the claim that two particular events are causally (...)
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  47. The Ontic Conception of Scientific Explanation.Cory Wright - 2015 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 54:20-30.
    Wesley Salmon’s version of the ontic conception of explanation is a main historical root of contemporary work on mechanistic explanation. This paper examines and critiques the philosophical merits of Salmon’s version, and argues that his conception’s most fundamental construct is either fundamentally obscure, or else reduces to a non-ontic conception of explanation. Either way, the ontic conception is a misconception.
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  48. Hume on Causation, Relations and “Necessary Connexions”.Jason Zarri - manuscript
    A specter is haunting Hume scholarship: the specter of the “New Hume.” Contrary to more traditional interpretations, according to which Hume rejects belief in any conception of causation that invokes (metaphysically) necessary connections between distinct existences, proponents of the New Hume hold that Hume at the least allowed for the possibility of such connections—it’s just that he thought we couldn’t know much, if anything, about them, if we assume that they do exist. -/- I will argue that the views of (...)
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