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  1. A Case of Shared Consciousness.Tom Cochrane - 2020 - Synthese 197:1-19.
    If we were to connect two individuals’ brains together, how would this affect the individuals’ conscious experiences? In particular, it is possible for two people to share any of their conscious experiences; to simultaneously enjoy some token experiences while remaining distinct subjects? The case of the Hogan twins—craniopagus conjoined twins whose brains are connected at the thalamus—seems to show that this can happen. I argue that while practical empirical methods cannot tell us directly whether or not the twins share conscious (...)
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  2. Evidence for Distinct Clusters of Diverse Anomalous Experiences and Their Selective Association with Signs of Elevated Cortical Hyperexcitability.Chun Yuen Fong, Chie Takahashi & Jason J. Braithwaite - 2019 - Consciousness and Cognition 71:1-17.
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  3. Book Review: The Left Hemisphere: Mapping Critical Theory Today. [REVIEW]Chamsy el-Ojeili - 2015 - Thesis Eleven 127 (1):152-155.
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  4. Brain, Language, and Survival After Death.Terence Hines - 2015 - In Keith Augustine & Michael Martin (eds.), The Myth of an Afterlife: The Case against Life After Death. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 183-194.
    This paper reviews the neuroanatomical bases of language processing in the brain. It argues that the highly detailed anatomical structures that process different aspects of language render any extracorporeal mind superfluous. Though conceivable, the reality of a mind that can exist independently of the brain would make redundant the neural architecture and complex processing mechanisms necessary for the production and understanding of language. Since these structures and mechanisms are manifestly not redundant, how could normal language function be preserved after their (...)
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  5. Hemispheric Differences in Relational Reasoning: Novel Insights Based on an Old Technique.Michael S. Vendetti, Elizabeth L. Johnson, Connor J. Lemos & Silvia A. Bunge - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  6. Hemispheric Specialization for Processing Arithmetic in Adults.Connaughton Veronica, Bothma Vicole, Amiruddin Azhani, Clunies-Ross Karen, French Noel & Fox Allison - 2015 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 9.
  7. Altered Structure of Dynamic Electroencephalogram Oscillatory Pattern in Major Depression.Alexander A. Fingelkurts & ANdrew A. Fingelkurts - 2014 - Biological Psychiatry:in press.
    Research on electroencephalogram (EEG) characteristics associated with major depressive disorder (MDD) has accumulated diverse neurophysiologic findings related to the content, topography, neurochemistry, and functions of EEG oscillations. Significant progress has been made since the first landmark EEG study on affective disorders by Davidson 35 years ago. A systematic account of these data is important and necessary for building a consistent neuropsychophysiologic model of MDD and other affective disorders. Given the extensive data on frequency-dependent functional significance of EEG oscillations, a frequency (...)
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  8. Assessment of Hemispheric Dominance for Receptive Language in Pediatric Patients Under Sedation Using Magnetoencephalography.Roozbeh Rezaie, Shalini Narayana, Katherine Schiller, Liliya Birg, James W. Wheless, Frederick A. Boop & Andrew C. Papanicolaou - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  9. Repeating with the Right Hemisphere: Reduced Interactions Between Phonological and Lexical-Semantic Systems in Crossed Aphasia?Irene De-Torres, Guadalupe Dávila, Marcelo L. Berthier, Seán Froudist Walsh, Ignacio Moreno-Torres & Rafael Ruiz-Cruces - 2013 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 7.
  10. Does Categorical Perception in the Left Hemisphere Depend on Language?Kevin J. Holmes & Phillip Wolff - 2012 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 141 (3):439-443.
  11. A Combination of Thematic and Similarity-Based Semantic Processes Confers Resistance to Deficit Following Left Hemisphere Stroke.Solène Kalénine, Daniel Mirman & Laurel J. Buxbaum - 2012 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 6.
  12. The Right Hemisphere in Esthetic Perception.Bianca Bromberger, Rebecca Sternschein, Page Widick, William Smith & Anjan Chatterjee - 2011 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 5.
  13. Split-Brain Cases.Mary K. Colvin & Michael S. Gazzaniga - 2007 - In Max Velmans & Susan Schneider (eds.), The Blackwell Companion to Consciousness. Blackwell.
  14. Auditory Priming of Frequency and Temporal Information: Effects of Lateralised Presentation.Alexandra List & Timothy Justus - 2007 - Laterality 12 (6):507–535.
    Asymmetric distribution of function between the cerebral hemispheres has been widely investigated in the auditory modality. The current approach borrows heavily from visual local–global research in an attempt to determine whether, as in vision, local–global auditory processing is lateralised. In vision, lateralised local–global processing likely relies on spatial frequency information. Drawing analogies between visual spatial frequency and auditory dimensions, two sets of auditory stimuli were developed. In the high–low stimulus set we manipulate frequency information, and in the fast–slow stimulus set (...)
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  15. Language in the Nondominant Hemisphere.S. Campbell & B. Keith - 2006 - In Keith Brown (ed.), Encyclopedia of Language and Linguistics. Elsevier. pp. 529--536.
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  16. Resolving Valid Multiple Model Inferences Activates a Lift Hemisphere Network.R. L. Waechter & Goel - 2006 - In Carsten Held, Markus Knauff & Gottfried Vosgerau (eds.), Mental Models and the Mind: Current Developments in Cognitive Psychology, Neuroscience, and Philosophy of Mind. Elsevier.
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  17. Behavioral Symmetry and Reverse Asymmetry in the Chick and Rat.Victor H. Denenberg - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):597-597.
    Chicks reared in the absence of light and rat pups reared without extra stimulation fail to exhibit behavioral laterality, implying that a threshold amount of environmental stimulation is necessary for the brain to follow an asymmetry pathway. Reverse asymmetry has been reported in the chick, but not the rat, though a sex difference resembling reverse asymmetry has been found in the rat.
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  18. Emotions, Unconscious Processes, and the Right Hemisphere.Guido Gainotti - 2005 - Neuro-Psychoanalysis 7 (1):71-81.
  19. The Right Hemisphere and the Dark Side of Consciousness.Julian Paul Keenan, Jennifer Rubio, Connie Racioppi, Amanda Johnson & Allyson Barnacz - 2005 - Cortex. Special Issue 41 (5):695-704.
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  20. Rightward Shift in Spatial Awareness with Declining Alertness.Tom Manly, Veronika B. Dobler, Christopher M. Dodds & Melanie A. George - 2005 - Neuropsychologia 43 (12):1721-1728.
  21. Self-Awareness and the Left Hemisphere: The Dark Side of Selectively Reviewing the Literature.Alain Morin - 2005 - Cortex 41:695-704.
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  22. Characteristics of Interhemisphere Interactions at Different Levels of Consciousness.M. N. Rusalova - 2005 - Neuroscience and Behavioral Physiology 35 (8):821-827.
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  23. Optimization Through Lateralization: The Evolution of Handedness.Robert L. Sainburg & Robert B. Eckhardt - 2005 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 28 (4):611-612.
    The target article proposes that behavioral asymmetries evolved in response to social pressures, accounting for the unequal distribution of handedness across the population. In contrast, we provide evidence that human handedness reflects individual adaptations that enhance movement skill, and that the distribution across the population is best explained by a genetic polymorphism, either balanced or tending toward fixation for right-handedness.
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  24. Split-Brain Reveals Separate but Equal Self-Recognition in the Two Cerebral Hemispheres.Lucina Q. Uddin, Jan Rayman & Eran Zaidel - 2005 - Consciousness and Cognition 14 (3):633-640.
    To assess the ability of the disconnected cerebral hemispheres to recognize images of the self, a split-brain patient was tested using morphed self-face images presented to one visual hemifield at a time while making “self/other” judgments. The performance of the right and left hemispheres of this patient as assessed by a signal detection method was not significantly different, though a measure of bias did reveal hemispheric differences. The right and left hemispheres of this patient independently and equally possessed the ability (...)
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  25. Hemisphere Differences in Conscious and Unconscious Word Reading.Jillian H. Fecteau, Alan Kingstone & James T. Enns - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (3):550-64.
    Hemisphere differences in word reading were examined using explicit and implicit processing measures. In an inclusion task, which indexes both conscious and unconscious word reading processes, participants were briefly presented with a word in either the right or the left visual field and were asked to use this word to complete a three-letter word stem. In an exclusion task, which estimates unconscious word reading, participants completed the word stem with any word other than the prime word. Experiment 1 showed that (...)
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  26. Handedness and the Fringe of Consciousness: Strong Handers Ruminate While Mixed Handers Self-Reflect.Christopher Lee Niebauer - 2004 - Consciousness and Cognition 13 (4):730-745.
    Previous research found that mixed handers were more likely than strong handers to update their beliefs . It was assumed that this was due to greater degrees of communication between the two cerebral hemispheres in mixed handers. Niebauer and Garvey made connections between this model of updating beliefs and metacognitive processing. The current work proposes that variations in interhemispheric interaction contribute to differences in consciousness, specifically when consciousness is used in rumination versus the metacognitive task of self-reflection. Using the Rumination–Reflection (...)
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  27. A Hemispheric Asymmetry for the Unconscious Perception of Emotion.Stephen D. Smith & M. Barbara Bulman-Fleming - 2004 - Brain and Cognition 55 (3):452-457.
  28. Vocalisation and the Development of Hand Preference.Chris Code - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):215-216.
    What do the relationships observed in the occurrence of various limb, facial, and speech apraxias following left hemisphere damage mean for Corballis's theory? What does the right hemisphere's role in nonpropositional and automatic speech production tell us about the coevolution of right hand preference and speech; how could the possibility that the right hemisphere may be “dominant” for some aspects of speech be accommodated by his theory?
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  29. Hemispheric Dominance has its Origins in the Control of the Midline Organs of Speech.Norman D. Cook - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):216-217.
    Unlike all other lateral specializations, the necessity for unilateral dominance is clear only for the case of the motor control of the speech organs lying on the midline of the body and innervated from both hemispheres. All functional asymmetries are likely to be a consequence of this asymmetry of executive control.
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  30. Lack of Hemispheric Dominance for Consciousness in Acute Ischaemic Stroke.B. Cucchiara, S. E. Kasner, D. A. Wolk, P. D. Lyden, V. A. Knappertz, T. Ashwood, T. Odergren & A. Nordlund - 2003 - Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery and Psychiatry 74 (7):889-892.
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  31. Handedness: Neutral or Adaptive?Charlotte Faurie & Michel Raymond - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):220-220.
    Corballis seems to have not considered two points: (1) the importance of direct selection pressures for the evolution of handedness; and (2) the evolutionary significance of the polymorphism of handedness. We provide arguments for the need to explain handedness in terms of adaptation and natural selection.
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  32. Dual Asymmetries in Handedness.Gregory V. Jones & Maryanne Martin - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):227-228.
    The possibility that two forms of asymmetry underlie handedness is considered. Corballis has proposed that right-handedness developed when gesture encountered lateralized vocalization but may have been superimposed on a preexisting two-thirds dominance. Evidence is reviewed here which suggests that the baseline asymmetry is even more substantial than this, with possible implications for brain anatomy and genetic theories of handedness.
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  33. Developmentally, the Arm Preference Precedes Handedness.Louise Rönnqvist - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):238-239.
    I would like to stress that early development repeats the evolution of the species. Hence, to understand the origins of functional brain asymmetry and the underlying mechanisms involved in handedness, we have to seek information not only from what we know about human evolution, but also from how an early hand preference develops in our own species.
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  34. The Left Hemisphere as the Redundant Hemisphere.Iris E. C. Sommer & René S. Kahn - 2003 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 26 (2):239-240.
    In this commentary we argue that evolution of the human brain to host the language system was accomplished by the selective development of frontal and temporal areas in the left hemisphere. The unilateral development of Broca's and Wernicke's areas could have resulted from one or more transcription factors that have an expression pattern restricted to the left hemisphere.
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  35. Grip Morphology and Hand Use in Chimpanzees : Evidence of a Left Hemisphere Specialization in Motor Skill.William D. Hopkins, Claudio Cantalupo, Michael J. Wesley, Autumn B. Hostetter & Dawn L. Pilcher - 2002 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 131 (3):412-423.
  36. Right Hemispheric Self-Awareness: A Critical Assessment.Alain Morin - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):396-401.
    In this commentaryI evaluate the claim made byKeenan, Nelson, OÕConnor, and Pascual-Leone (2001) that since self-recognition results from right hemispheric activity, self-awareness too is likely to be produced by the activity of the same hemisphere. This reasoning is based on the assumption that self-recognition represents a valid operationalization of self-awareness; I present two views that challenge this rationale. Keenan et al. also support their claim with published evidence relating brain activityand self-awareness; I closelyexamine their analysis of one specific review of (...)
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  37. Hemispheric Interaction and Consciousness: Degree of Handedness Predicts the Intensity of a Sensory Illusion.Christopher L. Niebauer, Justin Aselage & Christian Schutte - 2002 - Laterality 7 (1):85-96.
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  38. Half a Brain is Enough: The Story of Nico.A. Battro - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Half a Brain is Enough is the extraordinary story of Nico, a three-year-old boy who was given a right hemispherectomy to control his severe intractable epilepsy...
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  39. The Split-Brain Debate Revisited: On the Importance of Language and Self-Recognition for Right Hemispheric Consciousness.Alain Morin - 2001 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 22 (2):107-118.
    In this commentary I use recent empirical evidence and theoretical analyses concerning the importance of language and the meaning of self-recognition to reevaluate the claim that the right mute hemisphere in commissurotomized patients possesses a full consciousness. Preliminary data indicate that inner speech is deeply linked to self-awareness; also, four hypotheses concerning the crucial role inner speech plays in self-focus are presented. The legitimacy of self-recognition as a strong operationalization of self-awareness in the right hemisphere is also questioned on the (...)
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  40. The Right Hemisphere Pitches In.Mark Wexler - 2001 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 5 (10):416.
  41. Consciousness, Introspection, and the Split-Brain: The Two Minds/One Body Problem.K. Baynes & Michael S. Gazzaniga - 2000 - In Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.), The New Cognitive Neurosciences: 2nd Edition. MIT Press.
  42. The New Cognitive Neurosciences: 2nd Edition.Michael S. Gazzaniga (ed.) - 2000 - MIT Press.
    The majority of the chapters in this edition of The Cognitive Neurosciences are new, and those from the first edition have been completely rewritten and updated ...
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  43. Testing Tulving: The Split Brain Approach.Michael S. Gazzaniga & Melvin E. Miller - 2000 - In Endel Tulving (ed.), Memory, Consciousness, and the Brain: The Tallinn Conference. Psychology Press/Taylor & Francis.
  44. Hemispheric Interaction, Metacontrol, and Mnemonic Processing in Split-Brain Macaques.V. Kavcic, R. Fei, S. Hu & R. W. Doty - 2000 - Behavioural Brain Research 111:71-82.
  45. Agrammatism, Syntactic Theory, and the Lexicon: Broca's Area and the Development of Linguistic Ability in the Human Brain.Claudio Luzzatti & Maria Teresa Guasti - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (1):41-42.
    Grodzinsky's Tree-Pruning Hypothesis can be extended to explain agrammatic comprehension disorders. Although agrammatism is evidence for syntactic modularity, there is no evidence for its anatomical modularity or for its localization in the frontal lobe. Agrammatism results from diffuse left hemisphere damage – allowing the emergence of the limited right hemisphere linguistic competence – rather than from damage to an anatomic module in the left hemisphere.
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  46. Memory, Consciousness, and the Brain: The Tallinn Conference.Endel Tulving - 2000 - Psychology Pr.
  47. Cerebral Commissurotomy, Consciousness, Minds, and Persons.Fred Altieri - 1999 - Dissertation, University of Miami
    Epilepsy patients who have undergone cerebral commissurotomy exhibit striking behavior patterns, about which many data have been gathered. Philosophers have drawn certain metaphysical and epistemological conclusions from these data, including: That commissurotomy patients possess two streams of consciousness; that they possess two minds; that they are two persons; that all normal human organisms are actually composites of two persons; and that the commonsense concept of the mind must be discarded. I argue that a few such patients possess two stream of (...)
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  48. Understanding Metaphors with the Two Hemispheres of the Brain.Nikolaj Frandsen - 1996 - Danish Yearbook of Philosophy 31 (1):49.
  49. Conflicting Communication in a Split-Brain Patient: Support for Dual Consciousness.V. Mark - 1996 - In Stuart R. Hameroff, Alfred W. Kaszniak & A. C. Scott (eds.), Toward a Science of Consciousness. MIT Press. pp. 189--196.
  50. Residual Vision with Awareness in the Field Contralateral to a Partial or Complete Functional Hemispherectomy.C. M. Wessinger, R. Fendrich, A. Ptito & J. G. Villemure - 1996 - Neuropsychologia 34:1129-1137.
1 — 50 / 220