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  1. Conceptualising a Child-Centric Paradigm.Damian H. Adams - 2013 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 10 (3):369-381.
    Since its inception, donor conception practices have been a reproductive choice for the infertile. Past and current practices have the potential to cause significant and lifelong harm to the offspring through loss of kinship, heritage, identity, and family health history, and possibly through introducing physical problems. Legislation and regulation in Australia that specifies that the welfare of the child born as a consequence of donor conception is paramount may therefore be in conflict with the outcomes. Altering the paradigm to a (...)
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  2. Review: Recalling the Traumas: Review of "The Little Trials of Childhood". [REVIEW]Particia A. Adler & Peter Adler - 2000 - Human Studies 23 (3):339 - 341.
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  3. Forgiveness Education with Parentally Love‐Deprived Late Adolescents.Radhi H. Al‐Mabuk, Robert D. Enright & Paul A. Cardis - 1995 - Journal of Moral Education 24 (4):427-444.
    Abstract Two studies with male and female college students (n = 48 in study 1, n = 45 in study 2), who judged themselves to be parentally love?deprived, engaged in a randomised, experimental and control group design focused on forgiving the parent(s). Study 1 was a 4?day workshop centring on a commitment to forgive. Study 2 was a 6?day workshop that included more of the therapeutic regimen from the Enright and the Human Development Study Group (1991) forgiveness model. Study 1 (...)
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  4. Sailing Alone: Teenage Autonomy and Regimes of Childhood.Joel Anderson & Rutger Claassen - 2012 - Law and Philosophy 31 (5):495-522.
    Should society intervene to prevent the risky behavior of precocious teenagers even if it would be impermissible to intervene with adults who engage in the same risky behavior? The problem is well illustrated by the legal case of the 13-year-old Dutch girl Laura Dekker, who set out in 2009 to become the youngest person ever to sail around the world alone, succeeding in January 2012. In this paper we use her case as a point of entry for discussing the fundamental (...)
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  5. Ethics, Sexual Orientation, and Choices About Children by Timothy F. Murphy, 2012 Cambridge, MA: MIT Press 200 Pp, £18.95 (Hb). [REVIEW]David Archard - 2013 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):187-189.
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  6. Choosing Tomorrow's Children: The Ethics of Selective Reproduction – By Stephen Wilkinson.David Archard - 2011 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 28 (1):101-104.
  7. Can Child Abuse Be Defined?David Archard - unknown
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  8. Rights, Moral Values and Natural Facts: A Reply to Mary Midgley on the Problem of Child-Abuse.David Archard - 1992 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 9 (1):99-104.
    Mary Midgley asserts that my argument concerning the problem of child-abuse was inappropriately framed in the language of rights, and neglected certain pertinent natural facts. I defend the view that the use of rights-talk was both apposite and did not misrepresent the moral problem in question. I assess the status and character of the natural facts Midgley adduces in criticism of my case, concluding that they do not obviously establish the conclusions she believes they do. Finally I briefly respond to (...)
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  9. Child Abuse: Parental Rights and the Interests of the Child.David Archard - 1990 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 7 (2):183-194.
    I criticise the ‘liberal’view of the proper relationship between the family and State, namely that, although the interests of the child should be paramount, parents are entitled to rights of both privacy and autonomy which should be abrogated only when the child suffers a specifiable harm. I argue that the right to bear children is not absolute, and that it only grounds a right to rear upon an objectionable proprietarian picture of the child as owned by its producer. If natural (...)
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  10. Procreation and Parenthood: The Ethics of Bearing and Rearing Children.David Archard & David Benatar (eds.) - 2010 - Oxford University Press.
    Procreation and Parenthood offers new and original essays by leading philosophers on some of the main ethical issues raised by these activities.
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  11. Balancing a Child's Best Interests and a Child's Views.David Archard & Marit Skivenes - 2009 - .
  12. Paradoxes of Liberalism and Parental Authority.Dennis Arjo - 2016 - Lexington Books.
    This book examines recent attempts by liberal theorists to defend parental authority and the paradoxes that it poses. Dennis Arjo explores various topics within the philosophy of parenting such as education, discipline, and the right of parents to teach their own religious beliefs to their children.
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  13. Fundamental Interests and Parental Rights.Michael W. Austin - 2007 - International Philosophical Quarterly 47 (2):221-235.
    I argue for a moderate view of the justification and the extent of the moral rights of parents that avoids the extremes of both children’s liberationism and parental absolutism. I claim that parents have rights qua parents, and that these prima facie rights are grounded in certain fundamental interests that both parents and children possess, namely, psychological well-being, intimate relationships, and the freedom to pursue that which brings satisfaction and meaning to life. I also examine several issues related to public (...)
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  14. Children and Added Sugar: The Case for Restriction.Theodore Bach - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy:105-120.
    It is increasingly clear that children's excessive consumption of products high in added sugar causes obesity and obesity-related health problems like type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome. Less clear is how best to address this problem through public health policy. In contrast to policies that might conflict with adult's right to self-determination — for example sugar taxes and soda bans — this article proposes that children's access to products high in added sugars should be restricted in the same (...)
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  15. The Nature of Children's Well-Being: Theory and Practice.Alexander Bagattini & Colin Macleod (eds.) - 2014 - Springer.
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  16. Having and Raising Children: Unconventional Families, Hard Choices, Social Good (Review).Isaac D. Balbus - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (2):162-165.
  17. Well-Being, Disability, and Choosing Children.Matthew J. Barker & Robert A. Wilson - forthcoming - Mind:fzy039.
    The view that it is better for life to be created free of disability is pervasive in both common sense and philosophy. We cast doubt on this view by focusing on an influential line of thinking that manifests it. That thinking begins with a widely-discussed principle, Procreative Beneficence, and draws conclusions about parental choice and disability. After reconstructing two versions of this argument, we critique the first by exploring the relationship between different understandings of well-being and disability, and the second (...)
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  18. Intergenerational Justice for Children: Restructuring Adoption, Reproduction and Child Welfare Policy.Elizabeth Bartholet - 2014 - Law and Ethics of Human Rights 8 (1):103-130.
    An intergenerational justice perspective requires that we look at the condition of the existing generation of children and those to be born in the future. Many millions of the existing generation of children are now in trouble and at high risk of never fulfilling their human potential. These children are in turn unlikely, if they live to produce children, to be capable of providing the nurturing parenting that the next generation will need.The article’s starting premises are that we should count (...)
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  19. An Argument Against Spanking.Gary Bartlett - 2010 - Public Affairs Quarterly 24 (1):65-78.
    I sketch a non-rights-based grounding for the impermissibility of spanking. Even if children have no right against being spanked, I contend that spanking can be seen to be impermissible without appeal to such a right. My approach is primarily consequentialist but also has affinities with virtue ethics, for it emphasizes the moral importance of avoiding bad habits in one’s behavior toward one’s children.
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  20. The Unbearable Lightness of Bringing Into Being.David Benatar - 1999 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (2):173–180.
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  21. Doing the Best for One's Child: Satisficing Versus Optimizing Parentalism. [REVIEW]Jeffrey Blustein - 2012 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 33 (3):199-205.
    The maxim “parents should do what is in the best interests of their child” seems like an unassailable truth, and yet, as I argue here, there are serious problems with it when it is taken seriously. One problem concerns the sort of demands such a principle places on parents; the other concerns its larger social implications when conceived as part of a national policy for the rearing of children. The theory of parenting that creates these problems I call “optimizing parentalism.” (...)
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  22. Parents and Children: The Ethics of the Family.Jeffrey Blustein - 1985 - Journal of Philosophy 82 (6):330-332.
  23. Growing Up with Parents Who Have Learning Difficulties.Tim Booth & Wendy Booth - 1998 - Routledge.
    _Growing up with Parents who have Learning Difficulties_ uses a life-story approach to present new evidence about how children from such families manage the transition to adulthood, and about the longer-term outcomes of such an upbringing. It offers a view of parental competence as a social attribute rather than an individual skill, assessing the implications for institutional policies and practices. The authors address the notion of children having to parent their disabled parents and argue for a shift in emphasis from (...)
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  24. Licensing Parents in International Contract Pregnancies.Andrew Botterell & Carolyn McLeod - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 33 (2):178-196.
    The Hague Conference on Private International Law currently has a Parentage/Surrogacy Project, which evaluates the legal status of children in cross-border situations, including situations involving international contract pregnancy. Should a convention focusing on international contract pregnancy emerge from this project, it will need to be consistent with the Hague convention on Intercountry Adoption. The latter convention prohibits adoptions unless, among other things, ‘the competent authorities of the receiving State have determined that the prospective adoptive parents are eligible and suited to (...)
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  25. Loving Noncompliance: Determining Medical Neglect by Parents of HIV-Positive Children.R. Bourne - 2000 - Journal of Clinical Ethics 11 (2):121-125.
  26. Children's Choices or Children's Interests: Which Do Their Rights Protect?Samantha Brennan - 2003 - In David Archard & Colin M. [eds] Macleod (eds.), The Moral and Political Status of Children. Oxford University Press.
    The often‐posed dichotomy between the interest and choice theory of rights can obfuscate a proper understanding of children's rights. We need a gradualist model in which the grounds for attributing rights to a being change in response to the development of autonomy. Rights for children initially function to protect their interests but, as they develop into full‐fledged autonomous choosers, rights function to ensure that their choices, even those that do not serve their welfare, are respected.
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  27. The Moral Status of Children: Children's Rights, Parents' Rights, and Family Justice.Samantha Brennan - 1997 - Social Theory and Practice 23 (1):1-26.
    Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission. Reproduced with permission of the copyright owner. Further reproduction prohibited without permission.
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  28. How Many Parents Can a Child Have? Philosophical Reflections on the 'Three Parent Case'.Samantha Brennan & Bill Cameron - 2015 - Dialogue 54 (1):45-61.
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  29. Children’s Rights, Well-Being, and Sexual Agency.Samantha Brennan & Jennifer Epp - forthcoming - In Alexander Bagattini and Colin MacLeod (ed.), The Wellbeing of Children in Theory and Practice.
  30. Responsibility and Children's Rights: The Case for Restricting Parental Smoking.Samantha Brennan & Angela White - unknown
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  31. On Education.Harry Brighouse - 2005 - Routledge.
    What is education for? Should it produce workers or educate future citizens? Is there a place for faith schools - and should patriotism be taught? In this compelling and controversial book, Harry Brighouse takes on all these urgent questions and more. He argues that children share four fundamental interests: the ability to make their own judgements about what values to adopt; acquiring the skills that will enable them to become economically self-sufficient as adults; being exposed to a range of activities (...)
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  32. What Rights (If Any) Do Children Have.Harry Brighouse - 2002 - In David Archard & Colin M. Macleod (eds.), The Moral and Political Status of Children. Oxford University Press. pp. 31--52.
    According to the interest theory of rights, the primary function of rights is the protection of fundamental interests. Since children undeniably have fundamental interests that merit protection, it is perfectly sensible to attribute rights, especially welfare rights, to them. The interest theory need not be hostile to the accommodation of rights that protect agency because, at least in the case of adults, there is a strong connection between the protection of agency and the promotion of welfare. Children have welfare rights (...)
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  33. Family.Harry Brighouse & Adam Swift - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  34. Parents' Rights and the Value of the Family.Harry Brighouse & Adam Swift - 2006 - Ethics 117 (1):80-108.
  35. Professional and Agency Liability for Negligence in Child Protection.Donald C. Bross - 1983 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 11 (2):71-75.
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  36. Standards for an Account of Children's Well-Being.Stephen M. Campbell - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (9):19-20.
  37. Offering Testicular Tissue Cryopreservation to Boys: The Increasing Importance of Biological Fatherhood.Lisa Campo-Engelstein - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics: 13 (3):39 - 40.
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  38. Children's Spiritual, Moral, Social and Cultural Development: Primary and Early Years, by Tony Eaude.Mike Carroll - 2009 - Journal of Moral Education 38 (1):125-127.
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  39. That Many of Us Should Not Parent.Lisa Cassidy - 2006 - Hypatia 21 (4):40-57.
    : In liberal societies (where birth control is generally accepted and available), many people decide whether or not they wish to become parents. One key question in making this decision is, What kind of parent will I be? Parenting competence can be ranked from excellent to competent to poor. Cassidy argues that those who can foresee being poor parents, or even merely competent ones, should opt not to parent.
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  40. Review of Manifesting Inherent Perfection. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2015 - Vedanta Kesari:442-3.
    This review makes a case for holistic education and calls for revamping Indian education, using the pedagogical methods available in this book.
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  41. Ethical Issues in Discharge Planning for Vulnerable Infants and Children.Marsha H. Cohen - 1995 - Ethics and Behavior 5 (1):1 – 13.
    Discharge planning for vulnerable infants and children is a collaborative, inter-disciplinary, decision-making activity that is grounded in the ethical complexities of clinical practice. Although it is a psychosocial intervention that frequently causes moral distress for professionals and has the potential to inflict harm on children and their families, the process has received little attention from ethicists. An ongoing study of the transition of technology-dependent children from hospital to home suggests that the ethical issues embedded in the discharge-planning process may be (...)
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  42. On Triparenting. Is Having Three Committed Parents Better Than Having Only Two?Daniela Cutas - 2011 - Journal of Medical Ethics 37 (12):735-738.
    Although research indicates that single parenting is not by itself worse for children than their being brought up by both their parents, there are reasons why it is better for children to have more than one committed parent. If having two committed parents is better, everything else being equal, than having just one, I argue that it might be even better for children to have three committed parents. There might, in addition, be further reasons why allowing triparenting would benefit children (...)
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  43. Trust, Well-Being and the Community of Philosophical Inquiry.L. D'Olimpio - 2015 - He Kupu 4 (2):45-57.
    Trust is vital for individuals to flourish and have a sense of well-being in their community. A trusting society allows people to feel safe, communicate with each other and engage with those who are different to themselves without feeling fearful. In this paper I employ an Aristotelian framework in order to identify trust as a virtue and I defend the need to cultivate trust in children. I discuss the case study of Buranda State School in Queensland, Australia as an instance (...)
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  44. Philosophy for Children Meets the Art of Living: A Holistic Approach to an Education for Life.L. D'Olimpio & C. Teschers - 2016 - Philosophical Inquiry in Education 23 (2):114-124.
    This article explores the meeting of two approaches towards philosophy and education: the philosophy for children approach advocated by Lipman and others, and Schmid’s philosophical concept of Lebenskunst. Schmid explores the concept of the beautiful or good life by asking what is necessary for each individual to be able to develop their own art of living and which aspects of life are significant when shaping a good and beautiful life. One element of Schmid’s theory is the practical application of philosophy (...)
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  45. Fathers, Foreskins and Family Law.Jd Dena Davis - 2009 - Lahey Clinic Medical Ethics Journal 16 (2):4-7.
  46. Preconception Care: A Parenting Protocol. A Moral Inquiry Into the Responsibilities of Future Parents Towards Their Future Children.Z. E. E. der & Inez de Beaufort - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (8):451-457.
    In the Netherlands fertility doctors increasingly formulate protocols, which oblige patients to quit their unhealthy lifestyle before they are admitted to IVF procedures. We argue that moral arguments could justify parenting protocols that concern all future parents. In the first part we argue that want-to-be parents have moral responsibilities towards their future children to prevent them from harm by diminishing or eliminating risk factors before as well as during the pregnancy. This is because of the future children's potential to become (...)
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  47. The Kibbutz Children's Society‐‐Ideal and Reality.Yuval Dror - 1995 - Journal of Moral Education 24 (3):273-288.
    Abstract This article examines the Kibbutz children's society as an ideal and as it is in reality. Following an account of the vision and theory of the children's society four case studies are reported. Two are historical: the local children's society founded in Kibbutz Ein Harod in 1924; and the attempt by Zisling of Ein Harod to found a national children's society on the basis of local models. The other two are contemporary and relate to studies in the early 1990s (...)
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  48. Trust as a Virtue in Education.Laura D’Olimpio - 2018 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 50 (2):193-202.
    As social and political beings, we are able to flourish only if we collaborate with others. Trust, understood as a virtue, incorporates appropriate rational emotional dispositions such as compassion as well as action that is contextual, situated in a time and place. We judge responses as appropriate and characters as trustworthy or untrustworthy based on these factors. To be considered worthy of trust, as an individual or an institution, one must do the right thing at the right time for the (...)
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  49. Parents and Children.Frederick A. Elliston - 1983 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 1 (4):71-74.
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  50. Procreative-Parenting, Love's Reasons and the Demands of Morality.Luara Ferracioli - 2018 - Philosophical Quarterly 68 (270):77-97.
    Many philosophers believe that the relationship between a parent and a child is objectively valuable, but few believe that there is any objective value in first creating a child in order to parent her. But if it is indeed true that all of the objective value of procreative-parenting comes from parenting, then it is hard to see how procreative-parenting can overcome two particularly pressing philosophical challenges. A first challenge is to show that it is morally permissible for prospective parents to (...)
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