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  1. Vasubandhu's Commentary to the "Saddharmapundarika-Sutra": A Study of its History and Significance.Terry Rae Abbott - 1985 - Dissertation, University of California, Berkeley
    The Saddharmapundarika-sutra-upadesa , composed by the eminent Buddhist philosopher Vasubandhu in the fourth or fifth century A. D., has the important distinction of being the only Indian commentary on the Lotus Sutra to be preserved in any Buddhist canon. The Lotus Sutra, with a 2,000 year history spanning India, Central Asia, China and Japan, still remains one of the most important of all the Mahayana Sutras. ;This dissertation on Vasubandhu's commentary to the Lotus Sutra is comprised of three parts: Part (...)
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  2. Knowledge and Devotion in the Bhagavad-Gītā: A Suggestive Parallel From Chinese Buddhism.Michael S. Allen - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (1):39-51.
    How is devotion (bhakti) related to knowledge (jñāna)? Does one lead to the other? Do they correspond to different paths for different people? Commentators on the Bhagavad-Gītā have debated these questions for centuries. In this essay I will suggest, as many Indian commentators have, that the paths of devotion and knowledge described in the Gītā can be harmonized. I will not draw from Indian texts, however, but from a suggestive parallel in the history of Chinese religions: namely, the development of (...)
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  3. On Buddhistic Ontology: A Comparative Study of Mou Zongsan and Kyoto School Philosophy.Tomomi Asakura - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (4):647-678.
    Mou Zongsan's notion of "Buddhistic ontology" is interpreted here in its fundamental difference from his own previous metaphysical scheme, in the light of the Kyoto School philosophers' similar attempts to resolve the Kantian antinomy of practical reason. This is an alternative both to the analysis provided by previous interpreters of Mou's Buddhistic philosophy, such as Hans-Rudolf Kantor and N. Serina Chan, and to the comparative studies of Mou's theories with Kyoto School philosophy by Ng Yu-kwan. Previous researchers considered Mou's Buddhist (...)
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  4. Buddhisms and Deconstructions.Jane Augustine, Zong-qi Cai, Simon Glynn, Gad Horowitz, Roger Jackson, E. H. Jarow, Steven W. Laycock, David R. Loy, Ian Mabbett, Frank W. Stevenson, Youru Wang & Ellen Y. Zhang - 2006 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    Buddhisms and Deconstructions considers the connection between Buddhism and Derridean deconstruction, focusing on the work of Robert Magliola. Fourteen distinguished contributors discuss deconstruction and various Buddhisms—Indian, Tibetan, and Chinese —followed by an afterword in which Magliola responds directly to his critics.
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  5. Truth and Tradition in Chinese Buddhism: A Study of Chinese Mahayana Buddhism.R. L. Backus, Karl Ludvig Reichelt & Kathrina van Wagenen Bugge - 1969 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 89 (4):832.
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  6. Embracing the Icon: The Feminist Potential of the Trans Bodhisattva, Kuan Yin.Cathryn Bailey - 2009 - Hypatia 24 (3):178 - 196.
    I explore how the Buddhist icon Kuan Yin is emerging as a point of identification for trans people and has the potential to resolve a tension within feminism. As a figure that slips past the male/female binary, Kuan Yin explodes the dichotomy between universal and particular in a way that captures the pragmatist and feminist emphasis on doing justice to concrete, particular lives without becoming stuck in an essentialist quagmire.
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  7. Buddhism, Taoism and Confucianism in the Thought of Li Ao.Timothy Hugh Barrett - 1978 - Dissertation, Yale University
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  8. Li in East Asian Buddhism: One Approach From Plato's Parmenides.James Behuniak Jr - 2009 - Asian Philosophy 19 (1):31 – 49.
    In Plato's Parmenides , Socrates proposes a 'Day' analogy to express one possible model of part/whole relations. His analogy is swiftly rejected and replaced with another analogy, that of the 'Sail'. In this paper, it is argued that there is a profound difference between these two analogies and that the 'Day' represents a distinct way to think about part/whole relations. This way of thinking, I argue, is the standard way of thinking in East Asian Buddhism. Plato's 'Day' analogy can then (...)
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  9. The Śūraṅgama Sūtra: A New Translation, with Excerpts From the Commentary – By Ven. Master Hsüan Hua.James A. Benn - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (4):673-675.
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  10. Signs of Liberation?—A Semiotic Approach to Wisdom in Chinese Madhyamika Buddhism.Brian Bocking & Youxuan Wang - 2006 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (3):375–392.
  11. The Neo-Confucian Confrontation with Buddhism: A Structural and Historical Analysis.Edward T. Ch'ien - 1988 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (4):347-370.
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  12. The Conception of Language and the Use of Paradox in Buddhism and Taoism.Edward T. Ch'ien - 1984 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 11 (4):375-399.
  13. The Neo-Confucian Confrontation with Buddhism: A Structural and Historical Analysis.Edward T. Ch'ien - 1982 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 9 (3):307-328.
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  14. On Mou Zongsan's Hermeneutic Application of Buddhism.Wing-Cheuk Chan - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):174-189.
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  15. Two Dogmas of Critical Buddhism.Wing-cheuk Chan - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):276-294.
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  16. Introduction: Mou Zongsan and Chinese Buddhism.Wing-Cheuk Chan & Henry C. H. Shiu - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):169-173.
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  17. Transformation of Buddhism in China.Wing-Tsit Chan - 1957 - Philosophy East and West 7 (3/4):107-116.
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  18. The Thought of Mou Zongsan. By N. Serina Chan. (Leiden: Brill, 2011. 342 Pp. Hardback, ISBN 978‐900‐04‐21211‐4.).Wing‐Cheuk Chan - 2013 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (1):208-211.
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  19. Chinese Buddhism and Chtistianity.David W. Chappell - 1993 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 13:59-83.
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  20. Foreword: Philosophizing Chinese Buddhism as a Necessity.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):167-168.
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  21. National Institute for Advanced Humanistic Studies at Fudan University, Ed. 復旦大學文史研究院編, Research Methods and Prospects for Studying Buddhist History 佛教史研究的方法與前景.Fung Kei Cheng - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):441-444.
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  22. Beneficence as the Moral Foundation in Won Buddhism.Bongkil Chung - 1996 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 23 (2):193-211.
  23. Appearance and Realtty in Chinese Buddhist Metaphysics From a European Philosophical Point of View.Bongkil Chung - 1993 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 20 (1):57-72.
  24. Won Buddhism: A Synthesis of the Moral Systems of Confucianism and Buddhism.Bongkil Chung - 1988 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (4):425-448.
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  25. The Religious Philosophy of Liang Shuming: The Hidden Buddhist. By Thierry Meynard. (Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2011. Xxv, 226 Pp. Hardback, ISBN 1875-9386.). [REVIEW]Jason Clower - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (4):614-616.
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  26. Mou Zongsan on the Five Periods of the Buddha's Teaching.Jason T. Clower - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):190-205.
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  27. The Meaning of Ching (Sütra?) In Buddhist Chinese.Roger J. Corless - 1975 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 3 (1):67-72.
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  28. Buddhism and the Chinese Tradition.W. Th de Bary - 1964 - Diogenes 12 (47):102-124.
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  29. The Lotus Sutra and Process Philosophy. (News and Views).Philip E. Devenish - 2001 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 21 (1):119.
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  30. The Philosophical Foundations of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Stoicism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Existentialism.Kim Diaz & Edward Murguia - 2015 - Journal of Evidence-Based Psychotherapies 15 (1):39-52.
    In this study, we examine the philosophical bases of one of the leading clinical psychological methods of therapy for anxiety, anger, and depression, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). We trace this method back to its philosophical roots in the Stoic, Buddhist, Taoist, and Existentialist philosophical traditions. We start by discussing the tenets of CBT, and then we expand on the philosophical traditions that ground this approach. Given that CBT has had a clinically measured positive effect on the psychological well-being of individuals, (...)
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  31. Does Religion Mitigate Tunneling? Evidence From Chinese Buddhism.Xingqiang Du - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (2):1-29.
    In the Chinese stock market, controlling shareholders often use inter-corporate loans to expropriate a great amount of cash from listed firms, through a process called “tunneling.” Using a sample of 10,170 firm-year observations from the Chinese stock market for the period of 2001–2010, I examine whether and how Buddhism, China’s most influential religion, can mitigate tunneling. In particular, using firm-level Buddhism data, measured as the number of Buddhist monasteries within a certain radius around Chinese listed firms’ registered addresses, this study (...)
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  32. A Tentative Discussion of the Characteristics of Chinese Buddhism.Fang Litian - 1989 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 20 (4):3-71.
    Buddhism is one of the world's three largest religions. It originated in the fifth century B.C., and to date it has a history of over two and a half millennia. Buddhism had its earliest origins in ancient India and subsequently spread broadly in China, Japan, and many Southeast Asian countries. After entering China through India, Buddhism, transplanted to the soil of China's feudal society, took root and grew, producing its own peculiar structure and forming many schools, branches, and denominational offshoots (...)
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  33. The Power of Denial: Buddhism, Purity, and Gender.Bernard Faure & Steven Heine - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):409–412.
  34. The Possibility of Buddhist Ethical Agency Revisited—A Reply to Jay Garfield and Chad Hansen.Bronwyn Finnigan - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (1):183-194.
    I begin by warmly thanking Professors Garfield and Hansen for participating in this dialogue. I greatly value the work of both and appreciate having the opportunity to engage in a dialogue with them. Aside from the many important insights I gain from their replies, I believe that both Garfield and Hansen misrepresent my position. In response, I shall clarify the argument contained in my preceding comment, and will consider the objections as they bear on this clarified position.Both Garfield and Hansen (...)
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  35. The Encyclopedia of Eastern Philosophy and Religion: Buddhism, Hinduism, Taoism, Zen.Ingrid Fischer-Schreiber, Stephan Schuhmacher & Gert Woerner (eds.) - 1989 - Shambhala.
  36. Park, Jin Y. Ed., Buddhisms and Deconstructions.Victor Forte - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (2):221-224.
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  37. Did Dōgen Go to China? What He Wrote and When He Wrote It – by Steven Heine.Victor Forte - 2007 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (4):637–640.
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  38. Knowledge, Action, and the "One Buddha-Vehicle": A Comparative Approach.Warren G. Frisina - 2001 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 28 (4):429–447.
  39. Chinese Buddhism as an Existential Phenomenology.Charles Wei-Hsun Fu - 1984 - Analecta Husserliana 17:229.
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  40. Morality or Beyond: The Neo-Confucian Confrontation with Mahāyāna Buddhism.Charles Wei-hsun Fu - 1973 - Philosophy East and West 23 (3):375-396.
    In his critical examination of the most interesting and significant case, As the title shows, Of ideological 'love and hate' in the whole history of chinese philosophy and religion, The author first points out the mahayana influences on the formation of neo-Confucian philosophy. He then shows the neo-Confucian vehement attacks upon mahayana buddhism, Based on the three confucian principles inseparable and complementary to one another. After a philosophical clarification of mahayana thought against the neo-Confucian attacks, He concludes that, Despite their (...)
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  41. Why Did Bodhidharma Go to the East? Buddhism's Struggle with the Mind in the World.Jay L. Garfield - 2006 - Sophia 45 (2):61-80.
    This question—why did Bodhidharma come from the West?— is ubiquitous in Chinese Ch’an Buddhist literature. Though some see it as an arbitrary question intended merely as an opener to obscure puzzles, I think it represents a genuine intellectual puzzle: Why did Bodhidharma come from theWest—that is, fromIndia? Why couldn’tChina with its rich literary and philosophical tradition have given rise to Buddhism? We will approach that question, but I prefer to do so backwards. I want to ask instead, “why was it (...)
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  42. Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings.Jay Garfield & William Edelgass (eds.) - 2009 - Oup Usa.
    The Buddhist philosophical tradition is vast, internally diverse, and comprises texts written in a variety of canonical languages. It is hence often difficult for those with training in Western philosophy who wish to approach this tradition for the first time to know where to start, and difficult for those who wish to introduce and teach courses in Buddhist philosophy to find suitable textbooks that adequately represent the diversity of the tradition, expose students to important primary texts in reliable translations, that (...)
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  43. Chinese Buddhist Religious Disputation.Mary M. Garrett - 1997 - Argumentation 11 (2):195-209.
    From about the fourth to the tenth century Buddhist monks in China engaged in formal, semi-public, religious disputation. I describe the Indian origins of this disputation and outline its settings, procedures, and functions. I then propose that this disputation put its participants at risk of performative contradiction with Buddhist tenets about language and salvation, and I illustrate how some chinese Buddhists attempted to transcend these contradictions, subverting disputation through creative linguistic and extra- linguistic strategies.
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  44. Hermeneutics of Multiple Senses: Wang Jie's "Explanations and Commentary with Diagrams to the qingJing Jing".Joachim Gentz - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):346-365.
  45. Merleau-Ponty and Asian Philosophy : The Double Walk of Buddhism and Daoism.Jay Goulding - 2009 - In Jin Y. Park & Gereon Kopf (eds.), Merleau-Ponty and Buddhism. Lexington Books.
  46. An Introduction to Buddhist Ethics: Foundations, Values and Issues.Peter Harvey & Mark Siderits - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (3):405–409.
    This systematic introduction to Buddhist ethics is aimed at anyone interested in Buddhism, including students, scholars and general readers. Peter Harvey is the author of the acclaimed Introduction to Buddhism, and his new book is written in a clear style, assuming no prior knowledge. At the same time it develops a careful, probing analysis of the nature and practical dynamics of Buddhist ethics in both its unifying themes and in the particularities of different Buddhist traditions. The book applies Buddhist ethics (...)
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  47. "The End of Human Life": Buddhist, Process, and Open Theist Perspectives.William Hasker - 2005 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (2):183–195.
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  48. Selfhood and Identity in Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, and Hinduism: Contrasts with the West.David Y. F. Ho - 1995 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 25 (2):115–139.
  49. Contemporary Buddhist Philosophy: A Bibliographical Essay.Frank J. Hoffman - 1992 - Asian Philosophy 2 (1):79 – 100.
  50. Towards a Philosophy of Buddhist Religion.Frank J. Hoffman - 1991 - Asian Philosophy 1 (1):21 – 28.
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