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  1. Studying the Heart Sutra: Basic Sources and Methods.Jayarava Attwood - 2021 - Buddhist Studies Review 37 (2):199-217.
    This article illustrates the importance of research methods in Buddhist Studies using the recent article on the Heart Sutra by Ng and Ānando (2019) as a case study. The authors make a novel conjecture about the Heart Sutra to explain a difference between the Xīnjīng (T 251) and the Dàmíngzhòujīng (T 250) but in doing so they neglect the relevant research methods and critical thinking. Their selection of literary resources is somewhat erratic and their evaluation of them appears to contain (...)
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  2. W Ang Fuzhi’s Criticism of Buddhism and Its Limitations.Mingran Tan - 2018 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 17 (3):381-400.
    Wang Fuzhi’s 王夫之 remarks on Buddhism have not been given sufficient attention despite increasing research on him. The few works on this topic either focus on just one aspect of his view of Buddhism or fail to disclose the purpose and uniqueness of his attack of it. This essay analyzes his view of Buddhism comprehensively, in particular his insight into the paradox of Buddhist universal love and his rejection of Buddhist retribution and reincarnation from Confucian righteousness and qi 氣-monism. In (...)
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  3. Zhu Xi's Critique of Buddhism: Selfishness, Salvation, and Self-Cultivation.Justin Tiwald - 2018 - In John Makeham (ed.), The Buddhist Roots of Zhu Xi's Philosophical Thought. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 122-155.
    This article (1) offers a relatively comprehensive survey of criticisms of Buddhism made by the influential Chinese philosopher Zhu Xi 朱熹 (1130-1200) with translations of key passages, and (2) proposes that these criticisms are best understood as targeting the implicit presuppositions and practical implications of Buddhist teachings, not so much the explicit doctrines of the Buddhists. The article examines three sets of criticisms. The first has to do with Buddhist soteriology, the fundamental priority of Buddhist salvation, which Zhu takes to (...)
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  4. The Philosophical Foundations of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy: Stoicism, Buddhism, Taoism, and Existentialism.Kim Diaz & Edward Murguia - 2015 - Journal of Evidence-Based Psychotherapies 15 (1):39-52.
    In this study, we examine the philosophical bases of one of the leading clinical psychological methods of therapy for anxiety, anger, and depression, Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT). We trace this method back to its philosophical roots in the Stoic, Buddhist, Taoist, and Existentialist philosophical traditions. We start by discussing the tenets of CBT, and then we expand on the philosophical traditions that ground this approach. Given that CBT has had a clinically measured positive effect on the psychological well-being of individuals, (...)
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  5. Knowledge and Devotion in the Bhagavad-Gītā: A Suggestive Parallel From Chinese Buddhism.Michael S. Allen - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (1):39-51.
    How is devotion (bhakti) related to knowledge (jñāna)? Does one lead to the other? Do they correspond to different paths for different people? Commentators on the Bhagavad-Gītā have debated these questions for centuries. In this essay I will suggest, as many Indian commentators have, that the paths of devotion and knowledge described in the Gītā can be harmonized. I will not draw from Indian texts, however, but from a suggestive parallel in the history of Chinese religions: namely, the development of (...)
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  6. National Institute for Advanced Humanistic Studies at Fudan University, Ed. 復旦大學文史研究院編, Research Methods and Prospects for Studying Buddhist History 佛教史研究的方法與前景: Beijing 北京: Zhonghua Shuju 中華書局, 2013, 297 Pages.Fung Kei Cheng - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (3):441-444.
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  7. Does Religion Mitigate Tunneling? Evidence From Chinese Buddhism.Xingqiang Du - 2014 - Journal of Business Ethics 125 (2):1-29.
    In the Chinese stock market, controlling shareholders often use inter-corporate loans to expropriate a great amount of cash from listed firms, through a process called “tunneling.” Using a sample of 10,170 firm-year observations from the Chinese stock market for the period of 2001–2010, I examine whether and how Buddhism, China’s most influential religion, can mitigate tunneling. In particular, using firm-level Buddhism data, measured as the number of Buddhist monasteries within a certain radius around Chinese listed firms’ registered addresses, this study (...)
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  8. Philosophical Aspects of Sixth-Century Chinese Buddhist Debates on “Mind and Consciousness".Hans-Rudolf Kantor - 2014 - In Chen-Kuo Lin & Michael Radich (eds.), A Distant Mirror: Articulating Indic Ideas in Sixth and Seventh Century Chinese Buddhism. Hamburg University Press. pp. 337-395.
  9. A Distant Mirror: Articulating Indic Ideas in Sixth and Seventh Century Chinese Buddhism.Chen-Kuo Lin & Michael Radich (eds.) - 2014 - Hamburg, Germany: Hamburg University Press.
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  10. Readings in Later Chinese Philosophy: Han to the 20th Century.Justin Tiwald & Bryan W. Van Norden (eds.) - 2014 - Hackett.
    An exceptional contribution to the teaching and study of Chinese thought, this anthology provides fifty-eight selections arranged chronologically in five main sections: Han Thought, Chinese Buddhism, Neo-Confucianism, Late Imperial Confucianism, and the early Twentieth Century. The editors have selected writings that have been influential, that are philosophically engaging, and that can be understood as elements of an ongoing dialogue, particularly on issues regarding ethical cultivation, human nature, virtue, government, and the underlying structure of the universe. Within those topics, issues of (...)
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  11. The Thought of Mou Zongsan. By N. Serina Chan. (Leiden: Brill, 2011. 342 Pp. Hardback, ISBN 978‐900‐04‐21211‐4.).Wing-Cheuk Chan - 2013 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 40 (1):208-211.
  12. An Outline of Modern Chinese Buddhism's "Response" to Eastern and Western Philosophy.He Jianming - 2013 - Chinese Studies in History 46 (3):44-58.
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  13. What It Means to Interpret: A Standard Formulation and its Implicit Corollaries in Chinese Buddhism.Tao Jin - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2):153-175.
    In the study of the Buddhist practice of scriptural interpretation, an inevitable subject of inquiry, apart from the content of interpretation, is the act of interpretation itself. Such an inquiry may naturally go in two different directions, looking at either the theories of interpretation or the theories about interpretation. The theories of interpretation guide the understanding and retrieval of meaning, and the theories about interpretation explore instead the nature or, more specifically, the role of interpretation in the transmission of truth. (...)
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  14. The Religious Philosophy of Liang Shuming: The Hidden Buddhist. By Thierry Meynard. (Leiden and Boston: Brill, 2011. Xxv, 226 Pp. Hardback, ISBN 1875-9386.).Jason Clower - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (4):614-616.
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  15. Emptiness, Selflessness, and Transcendence: William James’s Reading of Chinese Buddhism.John J. Kaag - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):240-259.
    This article investigates William James's reading of the concepts of selflessness and transcendence in relation to the Chan and Pure Land schools of Chinese Buddhism. The divide between Chan and Pure Land Buddhism may be mediated if we attend to aspects of the two traditions that James found particularly meaningful. James is drawn to selflessness as presented in the concept of emptiness in the Chan understanding of meditative experience. He is equally interested in Buddhist devotional practices of Pure Land that (...)
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  16. An Easier Way to Become a Buddha?Fuchuan Yao - 2012 - Asian Philosophy 22 (2):121-132.
    Jay Garfield proposes a transpersonal way to ease the extreme difficulty to become a Buddha for those refugees who are agonized by the arduous pursuit. By ?transpersonal method?, Garfield means that we could accumulate others? karma to become a Buddha just as we do with others? knowledge. Garfield's proposal touches an essential question of Buddhism: how to become a Buddha or how to attain nirvana? Generally, most Buddhists think that nirvana should be done through the intrapersonal (or difficult) way rather (...)
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  17. On Buddhistic Ontology: A Comparative Study of Mou Zongsan and Kyoto School Philosophy.Tomomi Asakura - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (4):647-678.
    Mou Zongsan's notion of "Buddhistic ontology" is interpreted here in its fundamental difference from his own previous metaphysical scheme, in the light of the Kyoto School philosophers' similar attempts to resolve the Kantian antinomy of practical reason. This is an alternative both to the analysis provided by previous interpreters of Mou's Buddhistic philosophy, such as Hans-Rudolf Kantor and N. Serina Chan, and to the comparative studies of Mou's theories with Kyoto School philosophy by Ng Yu-kwan. Previous researchers considered Mou's Buddhist (...)
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  18. The Śūraṅgama Sūtra: A New Translation, with Excerpts From the Commentary – By Ven. Master Hsüan Hua.James A. Benn - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (4):673-675.
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  19. On Mou Zongsan’s Hermeneutic Application of Buddhism.Wing-Cheuk Chan - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):174-189.
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  20. Introduction: Mou Zongsan and Chinese Buddhism.Wing-Cheuk Chan & Henry C. H. Shiu - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):169-173.
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  21. Foreword: Philosophizing Chinese Buddhism as a Necessity.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):167-168.
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  22. Mou Zongsan on the Five Periods of the Buddha’s Teaching.Jason T. Clower - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (2):190-205.
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  23. The Possibility of Buddhist Ethical Agency Revisited—A Reply to Jay Garfield and Chad Hansen.Bronwyn Finnigan - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (1):183-194.
    I begin by warmly thanking Professors Garfield and Hansen for participating in this dialogue. I greatly value the work of both and appreciate having the opportunity to engage in a dialogue with them. Aside from the many important insights I gain from their replies, I believe that both Garfield and Hansen misrepresent my position. In response, I shall clarify the argument contained in my preceding comment, and will consider the objections as they bear on this clarified position.Both Garfield and Hansen (...)
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  24. Chinese Buddhism and the Threat of Atheism in Seventeenth-Century Europe.Thierry Meynard - 2011 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 31:3-23.
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  25. Between Mind and Trace — A Research Into the Theories on Xin 心 (Mind) of Early Song Confucianism and Buddhism.Shiling Xiang - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (2):173-192.
    From Han Yu’s yuan Dao 原道 (retracing the Dao) to Ouyang Xiu’s lun ben 论本 (discussing the root), the conflicts arising from Confucianists’ rejection of Buddhism were focused on one point, namely, the examination of zhongxin suo shou 中心所守 (something kept in mind). The attitude towards the distinction between mind and trace, and the proper approach to erase the gap between emptiness and being, as well as that between the expedient and the true, became the major concerns unavoidable for various (...)
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  26. Two Dogmas of Critical Buddhism.Wing-Cheuk Chan - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):276-294.
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  27. Hermeneutics of Multiple Senses: Wang Jie’s “Explanations and Commentary with Diagrams to the Qingjing Jing”.Joachim Gentz - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):346-365.
  28. Buddhist Warfare.Michael Jerryson & Mark Juergensmeyer (eds.) - 2010 - Oup Usa.
    This book offers eight essays examining the dark side of a tradition often regarded as the religion of peace. The authors note the conflict between the Buddhist norms of non-violence and the prohibition of the killing of sentient beings and acts of state violence supported by the Buddhist community, acts of civil violence in which monks participate, and Buddhist intersectarian violence.
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  29. The Characteristics of Chinese Buddhism.Ren Jiyu - 2010 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 41 (4):38-46.
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  30. Truth and Method in the Sūtra.Chen-Kuo Lin - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):261-275.
  31. Daoist Simulated Sermonization: Hermeneutic Clues From Buddhist Practices.Yuet Keung Lo - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):366-380.
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  32. The Religious Philosophy of Liang Shuming: The Hidden Buddhist.Thierry Meynard - 2010 - Brill.
    Liang Shuming, considered to be the Last Confucian, was a Buddhist.
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  33. A Buddhist-Confucian Controversy on Filial Piety.Guang Xing - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):248-260.
  34. Introduction.Zhihua Yao - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):151-155.
  35. Li in East Asian Buddhism: One Approach From Plato's Parmenides.James Behuniak - 2009 - Asian Philosophy 19 (1):31 – 49.
    In Plato's Parmenides , Socrates proposes a 'Day' analogy to express one possible model of part/whole relations. His analogy is swiftly rejected and replaced with another analogy, that of the 'Sail'. In this paper, it is argued that there is a profound difference between these two analogies and that the 'Day' represents a distinct way to think about part/whole relations. This way of thinking, I argue, is the standard way of thinking in East Asian Buddhism. Plato's 'Day' analogy can then (...)
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  36. Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings.Jay Garfield & William Edelgass (eds.) - 2009 - Oup Usa.
    The Buddhist philosophical tradition is vast, internally diverse, and comprises texts written in a variety of canonical languages. It is hence often difficult for those with training in Western philosophy who wish to approach this tradition for the first time to know where to start, and difficult for those who wish to introduce and teach courses in Buddhist philosophy to find suitable textbooks that adequately represent the diversity of the tradition, expose students to important primary texts in reliable translations, that (...)
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  37. Merleau-Ponty and Asian Philosophy : The Double Walk of Buddhism and Daoism.Jay Goulding - 2009 - In Jin Y. Park & Gereon Kopf (eds.), Merleau-Ponty and Buddhism. Lexington Books.
  38. A Sketch of the Diamondsutra's Logic of Not.Shigenori Nagatomo - 2009 - In David Edward Jones & Ellen R. Klein (eds.), Asian Texts, Asian Contexts: Encounters with Asian Philosophies and Religions. State University of New York Press.
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  39. Buddhist Philosophy: Essential Readings (Review). [REVIEW]Eric S. Nelson - 2009 - H-Buddhism.
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  40. Buddhism: Philosophy Beyond Gender.Sandra A. Wawrytko - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (2):293-312.
  41. Embracing the Icon: The Feminist Potential of the Trans Bodhisattva, Kuan Yin.Cathryn Bailey - 2008 - Hypatia 24 (3):178 - 196.
    I explore how the Buddhist icon Kuan Yin is emerging as a point of identification for trans people and has the potential to resolve a tension within feminism. As a figure that slips past the male/female binary, Kuan Yin explodes the dichotomy between universal and particular in a way that captures the pragmatist and feminist emphasis on doing justice to concrete, particular lives without becoming stuck in an essentialist quagmire.
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  42. Park, Jin Y. Ed., Buddhisms and Deconstructions.Victor Forte - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (2):221-224.
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  43. Review of Buddhisms and Deconstructions, by Jin Y. Park and Robert Magliola. [REVIEW]Steven Heine - 2008 - Philosophy East and West 58 (4):594-596.
  44. Chinese Buddhist Philosophy From Han Through Tang.Whalen Lai - 2008 - In Bo Mou (ed.), Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.
  45. Change Beyond Syncretism: Ouyi Zhixu’s () Buddhist Hermeneutics of the Yijing ().Yuet Keung Lo - 2008 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (2):273-295.
  46. Change Beyond Syncretism: Ouyi Zhixu’s () Buddhist Hermeneutics of the Yijing ().Yuet Keung Lo - 2008 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (2):273–295.
  47. Liang Shuming and Buddhist Studies.Zhang Wenru - 2008 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 40 (3):67-90.
  48. Buddhism, Confucianism and Taoism in Wei (221-265) and Both Jin (265-420) Periods.Leonid E. Yangutov - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 9:69-75.
    The article is devoted to the correlations of Buddhism with Confucianism and Taoism in Wei (221-265) and both Jin (265-420) periods. The philosophical principles of these three doctrines, their general and peculiarities in three doctrines philosophical principles which defined the forming in China own Buddhist schools have been showed there. The new view to the correlations between Buddhism and Taoism has been showed, the new conception that the correlations between Buddhism and Taoism in period of Wei are the correlations of (...)
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  49. The Compatibility Between Bodhisattva Compassion and 'No-Self'.Fuchuan Yao - 2008 - Asian Philosophy 18 (3):267 – 278.
    _Since arguably Bodhisattva Practice (bodhisattva-carya) is the foundation of Mahayana Buddhist ethics, it is significantly important for Bodhisattva compassion to be compatible with other Buddhist doctrines, specifically with the doctrine of 'no-self ' (anatta). There are two thoughts on the relation between compassion and 'no-self ': they are compatible or incompatibility. Most Buddhist authors accept the former view. However, the principal problem with the two views is that their arguments have not been singled out. So the acceptance or denial of (...)
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  50. Form, Principle, Pattern, or Coherence? Li in Chinese Philosophy.Brook Ziporyn - 2008 - Philosophy Compass 3 (3):401–422.
    This article provides an overview of controversies in the history of Chinese philosophy concerning the diversity of meanings of the term Li , as well as the comparative issues raised in various attempts by modern Chinese and Western interpreters to come to terms with this diversity of meanings. Revisiting the earliest pre-philosophical uses of the term, an attempt is then made to synthesize the insights of previous interpreters and open up a new path for investigating its distinctive implications in classical (...)
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