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  1. Neo-Confucianism: A Philosophical Introduction.Stephen C. Angle & Justin Tiwald - 2017 - Cambridge, UK: Polity.
    Neo-Confucianism is a philosophically sophisticated tradition weaving classical Confucianism together with themes from Buddhism and Daoism. It began in China around the eleventh century CE, played a leading role in East Asian cultures over the last millennium, and has had a profound influence on modern Chinese society. -/- Based on the latest scholarship but presented in accessible language, Neo-Confucianism: A Philosophical Introduction is organized around themes that are central in Neo-Confucian philosophy, including the structure of the cosmos, human nature, ways (...)
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  2. Text, Performance, and Gender in Chinese Literature and Music: Essays in Honor of Wilt Idema, Eds. Maghiel van Crevel, Tian Yuan Tan, and Michel Hockx. (Leiden: E. J. Brill, 2009. Vii, 465 Pp. Hardback, ISBN 9789004179066.). [REVIEW]Liana Chen - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (2):320-324.
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  3. Choosing Either/Or: A Critique of Metaphysical Feminism.Judith Clavir - 1979 - Feminist Studies 5 (2):402.
  4. The Many Dimensions of Chinese Feminism. By Ya‐Chen Chen. New York: Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.Yuanfang Dai - 2014 - Hypatia 29 (1):253-256.
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  5. Buddhist Nuns in Taiwan and Sri Lanka: A Critique of the Feminist Perspective – by Wei-Yi Cheng.Elise A. DeVido - 2007 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (4):640–645.
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  6. The Question of Women in Chinese Feminism.Elisabeth Engebretsen - 2006 - Contemporary Political Theory 5 (3):360-362.
  7. Preface: Contemporaneity and Feminism.Gu Linyu - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (2):185-186.
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  8. “Waiting for Godot”? Contemporaneity, Feminism, and Creativity.Linyu Gu - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (S1):171-192.
    This article speaks to contemporary women and men, who both suffer from gender issues such as disconnection, separation, oppression and who forever wait for a so‐called “tomorrow.” Through comparing process thought and Chinese philosophy, my study analyzes how process feminism synthesizes our demands for inter‐connection and how it alerts our narrow desires in seeking “a way out.” I further challenge a fundamental weakness in this genre of Whitehead's organic multiplicity by contributing “creative harmony” of yin 陰 and yang 陽 in (...)
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  9. “Waiting for Godot”? Contemporaneity, Feminism, Creativity.Linyu Gu - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (2):313-333.
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  10. Process and Shin No Jiko ("True Self"): A Critique of Feminist Interpretation of "Self-Emptying".Linyu Gu - 2000 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (2):201–213.
  11. Confucian Family-State and Women: A Proposal for Confucian Feminism.Ranjoo S. Herr - 2014 - In Ashley Butnor & Jen McWeeny (eds.), Liberating Traditions: Essays in Feminist Comparative Philosophy. New York, USA: Columbia University Press. pp. 261–282.
    I shall argue that, with a proper realignment of core Confucian values, an explicitly feminist reading of Confucianism—a conception of Confucian feminism—could be constructed to promote the feminist goal of gender equality in contemporary Confucian societies. My paper proceeds in the following order: first, I shall identify two aspects of Confucianism implicated in the Confucian subjugation of women: li and family. Given the centrality of both li and family in Confucianism, it may seem that Confucianism is inherently antagonistic to the (...)
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  12. Confucian Mothering: The Origin of Tiger Mothering?Ranjoo Seodu Herr - 2016 - In Mathew Foust & Sor-Hoon Tan (eds.), Feminist Encounters with Confucius. Boston, USA: Brill. pp. 40-68.
    In recent years, the notion of “tiger mother” has been popularized since Amy Chua’s publication of her memoir, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother (2011). This notion is allegedly representative of “Chinese” mothering that produces “stereotypically successful kids” (ibid., p.3). No wonder, the characteristics of the tiger mother revolve around strict disciplining and pressuring of children to excel academically based on her assumption that children “owe everything” to her and that she knows “what is best for [the] children” (ibid., p.53). (...)
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  13. Confucian Family for a Feminist Future.Ranjoo Seodu Herr - 2012 - Asian Philosophy 22 (4):327-346.
    The Confucian family, not only in its historical manifestations but also in the imagination of the Confucian founders, was the locus of misogynist norms and practices that have subjugated women in varying degrees. Therefore, advancing women’s well-being and equality in East Asia may seem to require radically transforming the Confucian family to approximate alternative ideal conceptions of the family in the West. This article opposes such a stance by arguing that (1) Western conceptions of the family may be neither plausible (...)
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  14. Is Confucianism Compatible with Care Ethics? A Critique.Ranjoo Seodu Herr - 2003 - Philosophy East and West 53 (4):471-489.
    This essay critically examines a suggestion proposed by some Confucianists that Confucianism and Care Ethics share striking similarities and that feminism in Confucian societies might take “a new form of Confucianism.” Aspects of Confucianism and Care Ethics that allegedly converge are examined, including the emphasis on human relationships, and it is argued that while these two perspectives share certain surface similarities, moral injunctions entailed by their respective ideals of ren and caring are not merely distinctive but in fact incompatible.
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  15. The Question of Women in Chinese Feminism.Ted Honderich - 2006 - Contemporary Political Theory 5 (3):360-362.
  16. Confucianism, Women, and Social Contexts.Xinyan Jiang - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (2):228-242.
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  17. Reply to Jay Gallagher.Xinyan Jiang - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (1):71-76.
    : In response to Jay Gallagher's criticism, I emphasize that my article "The Dilemma Faced by Chinese Feminists" (2000) is aimed at showing how both the level of economic development and sexual difference are relevant to the realization of sexual equality. It is a much more serious theoretical attempt than to argue that men have a physical advantage in a society where heavy labor is still in great demand.
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  18. The Dilemma Faced by Chinese Feminists.Xinyan Jiang - 2000 - Hypatia 15 (3):140-160.
    : In this essay I argue that in any country, the realization of sexual equality requires a certain level of economic development. I support this general theme by examining a particular case--a dilemma faced by Chinese feminists today. I intend to show that in a developing country such as China, where heavy physical labor is still in great demand in daily life and productive activity, full sexual equality cannot be a reality.
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  19. Lifestyle and Women's Morality.Li Jiqin & Hou Shujia - 1995 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 26 (3):75-96.
    Women's ethics are expressed in all aspects of women's thought and activity and behavior; they permeate all kinds of relationships in the sphere of social life; therefore, they are bound to be epitomized and reflected in a relatively concentrated way in women's lifestyles. For this reason, to study the kind of lifestyle women should establish for themselves, and to study the kind of relationship that exists between lifestyle and women's morality or ethics becomes an important part of the discipline of (...)
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  20. The Place of Multiple Meanings: The Dragon Daughter Rides Today.Catherine Keller - 2005 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (2):281–296.
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  21. The Tao of Women and Men Chinese Philosophy and the Women's Movement.Everett Kleinjans - 1990 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 17 (1):99-127.
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  22. Feminism and Postmodernism.T. A. Klimenkova - 1992 - Philosophy East and West 42 (2):277-285.
  23. The Daodejing: Resources for Contemporary Feminist Thinking.Karyn L. Lai - 2000 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (2):131–153.
    This paper explores the contribution of early Daoist thought to contemporary feminist philosophy. It has often been noted that the Daodejing stands in contrast to other texts of the same period in its positive evaluation of femininity and of values associated with the feminine. This paper takes a cautious approach to the Daoist concept of the feminine, noting in particular its emphasis on the characteristic of feminine submissiveness. On the other hand, the paper seeks to demonstrate that the Daoist treatment (...)
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  24. Introduction: Feminism and Chinese Philosophy.Karyn L. Lai - 2000 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (2):127–130.
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  25. Clara Wing-Chung Ho, Ed., Biographical Dictionary of Chinese Women: The Qing Period, 1644–1911.Karyn L. Lai - 1999 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (2):251-256.
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  26. The Sage and the Second Sex: Confucianism, Ethics, and Gender (Review).Li-Hsiang Lee - 2001 - Philosophy East and West 51 (3):429-434.
  27. Confucianism and Feminist Concerns: Overcoming the Confucian "Gender Complex".Chenyang Li - 2000 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (2):187–199.
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  28. Zhu XI and Confucian Sexual Ethics.Ping-Cheung Lo - 1993 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 20 (4):465-477.
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  29. Character of the Feminine in Lévinas and the Daodejing.Lin Ma - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (2):261-276.
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  30. Contemporary Feminist Body Theories and Mencius's Ideas of Body and Mind.Eva Kit Wah Man - 2000 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (2):155–169.
  31. The Notion of Feminine in Asian Philosophical Traditions.Maja Mil - 1997 - Asian Philosophy 7 (3):195 – 205.
    The abstract notion of “the feminine”, —in French, le f minin, and in German, das Weibliche —as substantivum neutrum, remains together with its opposite, the masculine, connotative of an inherent disparity. It is meant neither as the biological affiliation of sex, nor as gender, the social response, or echo, of this biological affiliation. Rather, it is the spiritual attitude which is the norm for psychic manifestations in general, and is its subtle psychosomatic background. It is not necessarily connected with the (...)
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  32. Chinese Philosophy and Woman: Is Reconciliation Possible?Ann A. Pang-White - 2009 - American Philosophical Association Newsletter 9 (1):1-2.
    Is a reconciliation possible between Chinese philosophy and woman when taking into account infamous gender-oppressive cultural practices such as foot-binding, concubinage, etc., in premodern Chinese societies? The article tackles the complexity of the subject by calling the readers' attention to texts from Confucian classics that indeed support intellectual equality of the sexes and classless access to education, while noting diverging historical cultural evidences of women's education and their social status in premodern, modern, and postmodern Chinese societies. The article challenges the (...)
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  33. Li-Hsiang Lisa Rosenlee, Confucianism and Women: A Philosophical Interpretation.Ann A. Pang-White - 2008 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 7 (4):461-465.
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  34. The Value in Storytelling: Women's Life-Stories in Confucianism and Judaism.Galia Patt-Shamir - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (2):175-191.
    This essay retells the stories of four exemplary women from Confucianism and Judaism, hoping that the tension these stories exhibit can teach us something about women’s lives within the boundaries of tradition, then and now. It refers to two ideal “family caretakers”: M eng Mu 孟母, who devoted her life to her son’s learning, and Rachel, who devoted her life to her husband, the famous Rabbi Akiva. Then it tells the stories of two almost completely opposing exemplary figures: The sages (...)
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  35. Learning and Women: Confucianism Revisited.Galia Patt-shamir - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (2):243-260.
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  36. Problems on Chinese Feminism.He Ping - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 25:29-36.
    The study of the Chinese feminism rose in 1980s. Its theoretical premise is that Chinese woman has divided into different groups and has gotten the uneven development, caused by the command economic system into the market economic system. By this premise, the given questions of Chinese feminism only accordwith the given woman groups, namely, each woman group has its own problems. All of the problems have shown that the key question in the study of the Chinese feminism is why the (...)
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  37. Femininity and Feminism: Chinese and Contemporary [A Special Issue of the Journal of Chinese Philosophy ]. Edited by LINYU GU. Volume 36, Number 2, June 2009. [REVIEW]Li-Hsiang Lisa Rosenlee - 2012 - Hypatia 27 (2):449-455.
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  38. Emotions and Self-Cultivation in Nü Lunyu«s™Þ>> (Woman's Analects).W. O. O. Tak-ling - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (2):334-347.
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  39. Two Perspectives of Care: Confucian Ren and Feminist Care.Julia Po-Wah Lai Tao - 2000 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (2):215–240.
  40. Ideal Womanhood in Chinese Thought and Culture.Robin R. Wang - 2010 - Philosophy Compass 5 (8):635-644.
    Based on original texts this essay attempts to describe two main conceptual constructions and practices of ideal womanhood in the Chinese tradition: Lienu (exemplary women) as the Confucian social inspirations for women and Kundao (way of female) as the Daoist commitment to bodily and spiritual transformation.
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  41. Kundao坤道: A Lived Body in Female Daoism.Robin R. Wang - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (2):277-292.
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  42. Reconceiving Women's Equality in China: A Critical Examination of Models of Sex Equality by Lijun Yuan.Robin R. Wang - 2008 - Hypatia 23 (1):217-220.
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  43. Women and Confucian Cultures in Premodern China, Korea, and Japan.Robin R. Wang - 2005 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (1):149–152.
  44. Kongzi as Feminist: Confucian Self-Cultivation in a Contemporary Context.Sandra A. Wawrytko - 2000 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 27 (2):171–186.
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  45. Birdwhistell, Joanne D., Mencius and Masculinities: Dynamics of Power, Morality and Maternal Thinking.Cecilia Wee - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (4):457-460.
  46. Mencius, the Feminine Perspective and Impartiality.Cecilia Wee - 2003 - Asian Philosophy 13 (1):3 – 13.
    In her well-known In A Different Voice, Gilligan argues that the male and female approaches to morality are fundamentally opposed to each other. The masculine approach emphasizes impartial justice, and the application of a 'hierarchy' of rules. In contrast, the feminine approach is grounded in care and concern for others, and emphasizes flexibility and attention to context when making moral decisions. This paper offers a critique of Gilligan's views through a consideration of Mencian morality. Mencius inhabits the 'feminine' perspective insofar (...)
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  47. Caring: Confucianism, Feminism, and Christian Ethics.Xiao Wei - 2007 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 39 (2):32-48.
  48. Emotions and Self-Cultivation in Nü Lunyu«女論語» (Woman's Analects).Terry Tak-Ling Woo - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (2):334-347.
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  49. What Sort of Feminist Am I?Wang Xiaobo - 1999 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 30 (3):73-77.
    Because my wife is doing research on women and has read a raft of theoretical books on feminism, we often discuss our respective stand-points with each other. As intellectuals, we will inevitably have standpoints quite close to some kind of feminism—my feeling is that if someone does not respect women's rights, that person cannot be called an intellectual—but there are an awful lot of different theories of feminism , and it is important to know which kind.
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  50. Under Confucian Eyes: Writings on Gender in Chinese History, And: Women in Daoism (Review).Yiqun Zhou - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (4):684-687.
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