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Summary  Chinese political philosophy section covers many themes and issues in major schools of thought in ancient China like Confucianism, Daoism, Legalism, Mohism and their later development, as well as modern encounter with the West Philosophy and debate. The major themes include but not limited, human-Heaven harmony,  human relationships, rule of virtue, the way of political, state and society, law and order, sagely politics, etc.
Key works political, Confucianism, Daoism, Legalism, Mohism, Buddhism, virtue, sage-hood, law.
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1 — 50 / 268
  1. added 2020-06-03
    China and England: On the Structural Convergence of Political Values. [REVIEW]Sandra Leonie Field - forthcoming - Journal of World Philosophies.
    At the centre of Powers' (2019) China and England is an extraordinary forgotten episode in the history of political ideas. There was a time when English radicals critiqued the corruption and injustice of the English political system by contrasting it with the superior example of China. There was a time when they advocated adopting a Chinese conceptual framework for thinking about politics. So dominant and prevalent was the English radicals' use of this framework, that their opponents took to dismissing their (...)
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  2. added 2020-05-16
    Moral Authority and Rulership in Ming Literati Thought.Peter Ditmanson - 2017 - European Journal of Political Theory 16 (4):430-449.
    This article explores the crises and debates surrounding the management of imperial family matters, especially succession, under the Ming Dynasty as an approach to understanding the limits of imperial power and the nature of literati discourse on the imperium. Ming officials and members of the literati community became passionately engaged in the debates on imperial family decisions, regarding the moral order of the imperial family as a key feature of their prerogatives over imperial power. This prerogative was based upon claims (...)
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  3. added 2020-05-16
    Zhuangzi: Closet Confucian?Michael Nylan - 2017 - European Journal of Political Theory 16 (4):411-429.
    Confucius and Zhuangzi are the two most famous thinkers in all of Chinese history, aside from Laozi, the Old Master. They occupy positions in the history of Chinese thinking roughly comparable to those held by Plato and Epicurus in the Western narrative of civilisation, in that they offer visions of the engaged political life and the engaged social self to which later political theorists and ethicists invariably return. For the last century or so, if not longer, Sinologists and comparative philosophers (...)
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  4. added 2019-11-02
    A Confucian Perspective on Tertiary Education for the Common Good.Edmond Eh - 2018 - Journal of the Macau Ricci Institute 3:26-34.
    Confucian education is best captured by the programme described in the Great Learning. Education is presented first as the process of self-cultivation for the sake of developing virtuous character. Self-cultivation then allows for virtue to be cultivated in the familial, social and international dimensions. My central thesis is that Confucianism can serve as a universal framework of educating people for the common good in its promotion of personal cultivation for the sake of human progress. On this account the common good (...)
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  5. added 2019-07-29
    Ethnicity : From Domestic Politics to International Politics.Dong Lai - 1997 - Chinese Studies in Philosophy 28 (3):67-74.
    In November 1989, the Berlin Wall, the symbol of the Cold War between the West and the East, came tumbling down. In December 1991, a superpower, the Soviet Union, ceased to exist. In the face of such dazzling and monumental change in the global situation, an American "Kremlinologist" acknowledged, bitterly: "We were wrong; we were all wrong." Indeed, it was perhaps the greatest irony of all.
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  6. added 2019-06-06
    Replying to Armour:Certainty and Exceptionalism: Threats to a World‐Humanities?Gordon Christie - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (4):580-593.
    This article explores attitudes underscoring arguments I believe are located in Professor Armour's address in the present special issue. I first show how Armour's arguments are intertwined with a resolute belief in the existence of a unique form of knowledge, one particularly attuned to the work of humanities scholars, and then go on to argue this certainty is linked to an antecedent attitude, one of exceptionalism. Spelling out what I find to be troubling about this species of argument leads into (...)
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  7. added 2019-06-06
    Beyond Liberal Democracy: A Debate on Democracy and Confucian Meritocracy.Fred Dallmayr, Chenyang Li, Sor-Hoon Tan & Daniel A. Bell - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (4):523-523.
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  8. added 2019-06-06
    Confucian Political Ethics – by Daniel A. Bell: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Sor-Hoon Tan - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (1):177-180.
  9. added 2019-06-06
    Review of Confucian Democracy: A Deweyan Reconstruction by Sor-Hoon Tan. [REVIEW]Joseph Grange - 2007 - Philosophy East and West 57 (3):397-399.
  10. added 2019-06-06
    Confucian and Liberal Ethics for Public Policy: Holistic or Atomistic?Andrew Brennan & Julia Tao - 2003 - Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (4):572-589.
  11. added 2019-06-06
    Trying to Do Justice to the Concept of Justice in Confucian Ethics1.Yang Mao - 1997 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 24 (4):521-551.
  12. added 2019-06-04
    Jenco, Leigh K., Making the Political: Founding and Action in the Political Theory ofZhang Shizhao: New York: Cambridge University Press, 2010, 282 Pages.Loubna El Amine - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (3):399-403.
  13. added 2019-02-28
    Individualism in Early China: Human Agency and the Self in Thought and Politics by Erica Fox Brindley. [REVIEW]Hagop Sarkissian - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (3):408-410.
    Review of Individualism in Early China: Human Agency and the Self in Thought and Politics by Erica Fox Brindley.
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  14. added 2018-06-19
    Huang Zongxi: Making It Safe Not to Be Servile.Sandra Leonie Field - 2020 - In Charlotte Alston, Amber Carpenter & Rachael Wiseman (eds.), Portraits of Integrity: 26 Case Studies from History, Literature and Philosophy. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 83-91.
    Integrity is often conceived as a heroic ideal: the person of integrity sticks to what they believe is right, regardless of the consequences. In this article, I defend a conception of ordinary integrity, for people who either do not desire or are unable to be moral martyrs. Drawing on the writings of seventeenth century thinker Huang Zongxi, I propose refocussing attention away from an abstract ideal of integrity, to instead consider the institutional conditions whereby it is made safe not to (...)
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  15. added 2018-05-20
    Confucianism's Political Implications for the Modern World.Ranjoo Seodu Herr - 2010 - In Miguel Vatter (ed.), Crediting God: The Fate of Religion and Politics in the Age of Global Capitalism.
  16. added 2017-06-19
    Neo-Confucianism: A Philosophical Introduction.Stephen C. Angle & Justin Tiwald - 2017 - Cambridge, UK: Polity.
    Neo-Confucianism is a philosophically sophisticated tradition weaving classical Confucianism together with themes from Buddhism and Daoism. It began in China around the eleventh century CE, played a leading role in East Asian cultures over the last millennium, and has had a profound influence on modern Chinese society. -/- Based on the latest scholarship but presented in accessible language, Neo-Confucianism: A Philosophical Introduction is organized around themes that are central in Neo-Confucian philosophy, including the structure of the cosmos, human nature, ways (...)
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  17. added 2017-02-24
    The Shenzi Fragments: A Philosophical Analysis and Translation.Eirik Lang Harris - 2016 - New York: Columbia University Press.
    The Shenzi Fragments is the first complete translation in any Western language of the extant work of Shen Dao (350–275 B.C.E.). Though his writings have been recounted and interpreted in many texts, particularly in the work of Xunzi and Han Fei, very few Western scholars have encountered the political philosopher's original, influential formulations. This volume contains both a translation and an analysis of the Shenzi Fragments. It explains their distillation of the potent political theories circulating in China during the Warring (...)
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  18. added 2017-02-24
    Aspects of Shen Dao's Political Philosophy.Eirik Lang Harris - 2015 - History of Philosophy Quarterly 32 (2):217-234.
    Even among those who work in the field of early Chinese philosophy,the name Shen Dao (慎到, ca. 360–285 BCe) rarely calls to mind much of interest, and what it does call up are often simply depictions of him in several of the more famous texts of the time: in the Han Feizi as an advocate of positional power; in the Xunzi as being blinded by a focus on laws; or in the Zhuangzi as one who wished to discard knowledge. Few (...)
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  19. added 2017-02-15
    A Confucian Constitutional Order: How China's Ancient Past Can Shape Its Political Future by Jiang Qing, Translated by Edmund Ryden, Edited by Daniel A. Bell and Ruiping Fan (Review).Stephen C. Angle - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (2):502-506.
    How important is Jiang Qing, whose extraordinary proposals for political change make up the core of the new book A Confucian Constitutional Order: How China’s Ancient Past Can Shape Its Political Future? In his Introduction to the volume, co-editor Daniel Bell maintains that Jiang’s views are “intensely controversial” and that conversations about political reform in China rarely fail to turn to Jiang’s proposals. At least in my experience, this is something of an exaggeration. Chinese political thinking today is highly pluralistic, (...)
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  20. added 2017-02-15
    Jiang, Qing, A Confucian Constitutional Order: How China’s Ancient Past Can Shape Its Political Future. Tran. By Edmund Ryden, Edited by Daniel A. Bell and Ruiping Fan: Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press, 2013, X + 256 Pages. [REVIEW]Ellen Y. Zhang - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):277-281.
  21. added 2017-02-15
    The Dark Side of Liberalism: Elitism Vs. Democracy.R. Hollinger - 1998 - Philosophy East and West 48:188-188.
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  22. added 2017-02-14
    Jiang Qing's Political Confucianism.Daniel A. Bell - 2011 - In Ruiping Fan (ed.), The Renaissance of Confucianism in Contemporary China. Springer. pp. 139--152.
  23. added 2017-02-14
    Book Reivew: Democracy's Dharma: Religious Renaissance and Political Development in Taiwan.Murray A. Rubinstein - 2008 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (4):695-697.
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  24. added 2017-02-14
    The Conception of Wealth Among the Merchants in Late Imperial China.T. S. Cheung - 2006 - Journal of Human Values 12 (1):41-53.
    This article reassesses Weber's position on the influence of Confucianism on China's failure to develop the modern form of capitalism by focusing on the conception of wealth among the merchants in the Ming and Qing dynasties. It starts with a review of the criticisms directed towards Weber's theses, including his claim about an affinity between Calvinism and the spirit of capitalism, and his assertion about the lack of moral tensions in Confucianism. We argue that despite the flaws in his analyses, (...)
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  25. added 2017-02-14
    From Partial Liberty to Minimal Democracy.G. G. Wu - 2003 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 34 (4):57-74.
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  26. added 2017-02-14
    East Meets West: Human Rights and Democracy in East Asia.Daniel A. Bell - 2000 - Princeton University Press.
    Is liberal democracy a universal ideal? Proponents of "Asian values" argue that it is a distinctive product of the Western experience and that Western powers shouldn't try to push human rights and democracy onto Asian states. Liberal democrats in the West typically counter by questioning the motives of Asian critics, arguing that Asian leaders are merely trying to rationalize human-rights violations and authoritarian rule. In this book--written as a dialogue between an American democrat named Demo and three East Asian critics--Daniel (...)
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  27. added 2017-02-13
    Meeting the Challenge of Democracy to Confucianism®.Chenyang Li - 2003 - In Keli Fang (ed.), Chinese Philosophy and the Trends of the 21st Century Civilization. Commercial Press. pp. 4--231.
  28. added 2017-02-13
    From Partial Liberty to Minimal Democracy: The Political Agenda of Post-Reform China in Debate.Wu Guoguang - 2003 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 34 (4):57-74.
    This article presents a conceptual investigation of the intellectual debates on the normative destination of China, which have intensified since the mid-1990s when both liberalism and the New Left emerged under the Chinese backgrounds of the spreading of marketization and the maintaining of political authoritarianism.1 The investigation, however, is not an attempt to systematically examine those debates, which, as usual in the Chinese intellectual style of the twentieth century, often freely and arbitrarily cross various issue-areas and mix very different concepts. (...)
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  29. added 2017-02-13
    The Third Way.Zhang Rulun - 2000 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 31 (4):32-45.
    More than half a century ago, a so-called Third Side appeared in China's political arena. The word "third" signified that its proponents intended to take a "middle way" amid the desperate, life-and-death battle between the Nationalist party and the Communist party. In a 1946 speech delivered at the Tianjin YMCA, entitled "A Political Line of an Intermediate Nature," Zhang Dongsun presented a clear and to-the-point formulation of this "middle way":In the political aspect, we should adopt more from the British and (...)
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  30. added 2017-02-12
    Strong Soldiers, Failed Revolution: The State and Military in Burma, 1962-88.Yoshihiro Nakanishi - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
  31. added 2017-02-12
    Ends and Rebirths: An Interview with Daniel Bell.Peter Beilharz - 2006 - Thesis Eleven 85 (1):93-103.
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  32. added 2017-02-11
    On Confucian Political Philosophy and Its Theory of Justice.Guo Qiyong - 2013 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 8 (1):53-75.
  33. added 2017-02-11
    Bai, Tongdong, China: The Political Philosophy of the Middle Kingdom: New York: Zed Books, 2012, Viii+206 Pages. [REVIEW]Kurtis G. Hagen - 2013 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 12 (4):545-549.
  34. added 2017-02-11
    Four Models of the Relationship Between Confucianism and Democracy.Baogang He - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (1):18-33.
  35. added 2017-02-11
    Critical Reflections on Rawlsian Justice Versus Confucian Justice.Chunc‐Yinc Chenc - 1997 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 24 (4):417-426.
  36. added 2017-02-10
    China: The Political Philosophy of the Middle Kingdom.Tongdong Bai - 2012 - Zed Books.
    But what is the message of China's rise as an economic and political power? Tongdong Bai addresses this pressing question by examining the history of political theories and practices from China's past, and showing how it impacts upon the present. Chinese political traditions are often viewed as "authoritarian" (in contrast with "Western" democratic traditions), but the historical reality is much more complex and there is a need to understand the political values shaping China. Bai argues that the debates between China's (...)
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  37. added 2017-02-09
    Confucian Liberalism and Western Parochialism: A Response to Paul A. Cohen.Wm Theodore De Bary - 1985 - Philosophy East and West 35 (4):399 - 412.
  38. added 2017-02-08
    Contexts and Issues of Contemporary Political Philosophy in China.Liu Xin - 2003 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 34 (3):35-54.
    Political philosophy begins with systematic reflection on existing political practices; and yet it requires something more than this. Since any persisting political practice both originated from a specific culture of the past and will shape a stable but alterable culture in the future, through its own character in interaction with other cultures, political philosophers should open a wider horizon than the political ideas of a certain culture, and seek a deeper insight than questionable belief in the incompatibility of different political (...)
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  39. added 2017-02-08
    The Question of People's Rights in the Provincial Constitutions.Gao Yihan - 1999 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 31 (1):62-63.
    … Talking again about the right to freedom, the situation is the same. That is, the right to freedom is as vulnerable in the face of social inequalities as the right to property, which Gao has just discussed. For example, the constitution stipulates only that "people have freedom of speech and thought." We have to ask whether, in order to enjoy these kinds of freedoms, people do not also need some corresponding life capabilities? [If so], then should society not have (...)
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  40. added 2017-02-08
    Promote Democracy, Improve the Legal System, and Accelerate the Realization of the Four Modernizations.Wang Jiafu & Xia Shuhua - 1980 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 11 (4):38-59.
    In accordance with the spirit of the Third Plenary Session of the Eleventh Central Committee of the Chinese Communist Party [December 1978], Comrade Hua Guofeng, in his "Report on the Work of the Government" delivered to the Second Session of the Fifth National People's Congress [address of June 18, 1979], provided a thorough discussion on the strengthening of socialist democracy and improvement of the socialist legal system. This session of the Congress solemnly passed the Electoral Law, the Criminal Law, the (...)
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  41. added 2017-02-02
    Democracy's Dharma: Religious Renaissance and Political Development in Taiwan – by Richard Madsen.Murray A. Rubinstein - 2008 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (4):695-697.
  42. added 2017-02-01
    Democratic Ideal and Practice: A Critical Reflection.L. I. U. Shu-hsien - 2007 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (2):257–275.
  43. added 2017-01-31
    On How to Construct a Confucian Democracy for Modern Times.Roger T. Ames - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):61-81.
    In his new book, Confucian Perfectionism: A Political Philosophy for Modern Times, Joseph Chan observes that Confucianism from its inception has suffered from a gap between its lofty aspirations and its historical reality—that is, there has been a severe discrepancy between its strong and resilient regulative ideals and a persistent pattern of traditionally weak social and governmental institutions and their practices. To overcome this historical disparity, Chan argues that contemporary Confucians should draw upon Western liberal institutions to the extent that (...)
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  44. added 2017-01-28
    Review of Alternative Conceptions of Civil Society by Simone Chambers; Will Kymlicka. [REVIEW]J. Tiles - 2003 - Philosophy East and West 53 (4):617-617.
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  45. added 2017-01-28
    The Antinomy of Divine Right and the Right to Resistance: Tianming, Dei Gratia, and Vox Populi in Syngman Rhee's Korea, 1945-1960. [REVIEW]Sung-Yoon Lee - 1998 - Dissertation, Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy (Tufts University)
    With the rise of industrial East Asia in the latter half of this "American Century," Confucianism has been blamed and blessed, condemned and condoned with equal fervor by intellectuals of both Confucian and Judeo-Christian backgrounds. Because a nation's life-orientation--that is, "culture," in the broadest sense--is embedded in seemingly immutable and distinct primordial ties, such as, language, religion and tradition, it is often deemed, much like and individual's "character" or "personality," as the root of all national success and failure. ;I try (...)
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  46. added 2017-01-28
    Democracy in a World of Tensions.Richard Mckeon - 1952 - Philosophy East and West 2 (1):86-88.
  47. added 2017-01-27
    Epistemic Elitism, Paternalism, and Confucian Democracy.Shaun O’Dwyer - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (1):33-54.
    This paper brings a fresh, epistemic perspective to bear on prominent Confucian philosophers’ arguments for a hybrid Deweyan-Confucian democracy, or for an illiberal democracy with “Confucian characteristics.” Reconstructing principles for epistemic elitism and paternalism from the pre-Qin 秦 Confucian thought that inspires these advocates for Confucian democracy, it finds two major problems with their proposals. For those who abandon or modify this epistemic elitism and paternalism in accordance with , the result is a philosophical syncretism that is either unconvincingly Confucian (...)
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  48. added 2017-01-27
    Reviving the Past for the Future?: The (In)Compatibility Between Confucianism and Democracy in Contemporary China.Demin Duan - 2014 - Asian Philosophy 24 (2):147-157.
    The issue of (in)compatibility between Confucianism and modern democracy, particularly in China, has attracted much debate over the decade. This article singles out the particular notion of Minben ??, which is at the center of the argument for a ?Confucian democracy?, and argues that it is fundamentally different from modern democracy. However, this does not mean that Confucianism could not be connected with modern democracy. The important question is: what exactly does it mean to ?connect? Confucianism to the modern society? (...)
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  49. added 2017-01-27
    Civil Society and Democracy.Dai Qing - 1996 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 27 (2):18-29.
    It has been more than four years since the 1989 Tiananmen incident. At present, the central demand in those days for democracy—also the major demand for over the past hundred years by China's martyrs and heroes—is still apparently lingering at various meetings and in many people's minds. No one it seems—not former officials nor those still holding onto their positions, nor even those who out of despair yell at the totalitarian system for their own personal gain—disagrees with the fundamental fact (...)
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  50. added 2017-01-26
    Democracy in Contemporary Confucian Philosophy.David Elstein - 2014 - Routledge.
    This book examines democracy in recent Chinese-language philosophical work. It focuses on Confucian-inspired political thought in the Chinese intellectual world from after the communist revolution in China until today. The volume analyzes six significant contemporary Confucian philosophers in China and Taiwan, describing their political thought and how they connect their thought to Confucian tradition, and critiques their political proposals and views. It illustrates how Confucianism has transformed in modern times, the divergent understandings of Confucianism today, and how contemporary Chinese philosophers (...)
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