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  1. Chan/Zen, the Oxherding Pictures, and the World-Affirming Turn in Chinese Buddhism.Joseph A. Adler - forthcoming - In Lewis Hyde & Max Gimblett (eds.), The Disappearing Ox. Port Townsend, WA 98368, USA:
    Foreword to Lewis Hyde and Max Gimblett, The Disappearing Ox (Port Townsend, WA: Copper Canyon Press).
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  2. The Technology of Awakening: Experiments in Zen Phenomenology.Brentyn Ramm - 2021 - Religions 12 (3):192.
    In this paper, I investigate the phenomenology of awakening in Chinese Zen Buddhism. In this tradition, to awaken is to ‘see your true nature’. In particular, the two aspects of awakening are: (1) seeing that the nature of one’s self or mind is empty or void and (2) an erasing of the usual (though merely apparent) boundary between subject and object. In the early Zen tradition, there are many references to awakening as chopping off your head, not having eyes, nose (...)
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  3. Master Questions, Student Questions, and Genuine Questions: A Performative Analysis of Questions in Chan Encounter Dialogues.Nathan Eric Dickman - 2020 - Religions 2 (11):72.
    I want to know whether Chan masters and students depicted in classical Chan transmission literature can be interpreted as asking open (or what I will call “genuine”) questions. My task is significant because asking genuine questions appears to be a decisive factor in ascertaining whether these figures represent models for dialogue—the kind of dialogue championed in democratic society and valued by promoters of interreligious exchange. My study also contributes to a more comprehensive understanding of early Chan not only by detailing (...)
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  4. Paradoxical Language in Chan Buddhism.Chien-Hsing Ho - 2020 - In Yiu-Ming Fung (ed.), Dao Companion to Chinese Philosophy of Logic. Dordrecht: Springer. pp. 389-404.
    Chinese Chan or Zen Buddhism is renowned for its improvisational, atypical, and perplexing use of words. In particular, the tradition’s encounter dialogues, which took place between Chan masters and their interlocutors, abound in puzzling, astonishing, and paradoxical ways of speaking. In this chapter, we are concerned with Chan’s use of paradoxical language. In philosophical parlance, a linguistic paradox comprises the confluence of opposite or incongruent concepts in a way that runs counter to our common sense and ordinary rational thinking. One (...)
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  5. Illuminating a Truth: Dṛṣṭānta and Huatou.Jeson Woo - 2020 - Religions 11 (9):1-11.
    In Chan/Seon/Zen (禪, hereafter referred to as Chan) Buddhism, the gongan (公案), a word that can be literally translated as “public case”, is conceived as both the tool by which enlightenment is brought about and an expression of the enlightened mind itself. Among the diverse styles of gongan, perhaps the most puzzling is a form of its key phrase, huatou (話頭), that utilizes specific things in the world. These things are either real and empirically observable, or conversely, unreal and merely (...)
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  6. Review of Living Karma: The Religious Practices of Ouyi Zhixu. [REVIEW]Subhasis Chattopadhyay - 2019 - Prabuddha Bharata or Awakened India 124 (May):478, 486.
    Review of the Chinese Zen Master Ouyi Zhixu.
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  7. Moving Meditation: P Aik Nam June’s TV Buddha and Its Zen Buddhist Aesthetic Meaning.Tae-Seung Lim - 2019 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 18 (1):91-107.
    The aesthetic spirit in Paik Nam June’s video art, TV Buddha, originated in the aesthetics of Zen Buddhism, and the parameters that established Paik’s aesthetic comprised the indigenous Eastern aesthetic idea of dongjing 動靜. Yi 逸 is the paramount aesthetic in Zen Buddhism, suggesting the transcendence of preexisting tracks and conventions. Paik’s behavioral music, to which he was dedicated before pioneering video art in earnest, was related to yi in terms of the complete aspects of forms, themes, and so on, (...)
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  8. Shocking Grace, Sudden Enlightenment: O’Connor and the Koans of Zen Buddhism.Scott Forschler - 2017 - The Flannery O'Connor Review 15:50-69.
    The work argues that the koans of Zen Buddhism have several intriguing non-accidental parallels with the short stories of Catholic author Flannery O'Connor. Both typically portray characters in a state of non-enlightenment in which they are egoistically obsessed with something which prevents them from perceiving and properly responding to the real world around them. Both present the characters with some opportunity for enlightenment, which they may or may not take up. Both come in a variety of forms, in order to (...)
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  9. Lee, Yun-Sang 李潤生, The Koan of Chan Buddhism 禪宗公案: Beijing 北京: Zongjiao Wenhua Chubanshe 宗教文化出版社, 2016, 608 Pages.King Chiu - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):649-651.
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  10. Like Cats and Dogs: Contesting the Mu Kōan in Zen Buddhism by Steven Heine.Victor Forte - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (2):671-676.
    Steven Heine’s latest book on the history of kōans, Like Cats and Dogs: Contesting the Mu Kōan in Zen Buddhism, is his second monograph dedicated to a single kōan case record. The author’s first such offering, Shifting Shape, Shaping Text: Philosophy and Folklore in the Fox Kōan, focused on the second case record of the thirteenth-century Gateless Gate collection. Published at the end of the 1990s the text was a response, in many ways, to the two authors who dominated the (...)
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  11. Nerve/Nurses of the Cosmic Doctor: Wang Yang-Ming on Self-Awareness as World-Awareness.Joshua M. Hall - 2016 - Asian Philosophy 26 (2):149-165.
    In Philip J. Ivanhoe’s introduction to his Readings from the Lu-Wang School of Neo-Confucianism, he argues convincingly that the Ming-era Neo-Confucian philosopher Wang Yang-ming (1472–1529) was much more influenced by Buddhism (especially Zen’s Platform Sutra) than has generally been recognized. In light of this influence, and the centrality of questions of selfhood in Buddhism, in this article I will explore the theme of selfhood in Wang’s Neo-Confucianism. Put as a mantra, for Wang “self-awareness is world-awareness.” My central image for this (...)
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  12. When There Are No More Cats to Argue About: Chan Buddhist Views of Animals in Relation to Universal Buddha‐Nature.Steven Heine - 2016 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 43 (3-4):239-258.
    Chan Buddhist discourse refers repeatedly to many kinds of animals, particularly dogs and cats, as symbols or in fables in order to comment ironically on human attitudes and behavior. These creatures are appreciated for their positive qualities yet are also scathingly criticized for representing a lack of discipline and self-control. This paper considers how a couple of Chan gongan cases featuring animals are related to the Mahayana doctrine of universal Buddha-nature. Does Chan accept and approve or reject and refute the (...)
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  13. Interdependence and Nonduality: On the Linguistic Strategy of the Platform Sūtra.Chien-Hsing Ho - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1231-1250.
    Although Chan, or Zen, Buddhism traditionally claimed itself as a special transmission outside doctrinal teachings that eschews the written word, it has long been praised for its improvisational, atypical, intriguing, and intricate use of words. Prominent Chan masters are characteristically skillful in employing paradoxical and aporetic phrases, figurative and poetic expressions, negations, questions, repetitions, and so forth, to express their thoughts, indicate their awakened states of mind, cut off the interlocutor’s habitual dualistic thinking, or evoke in him or her an (...)
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  14. Chan Buddhism.Barry Allen - 2015 - In Vanishing Into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition. Harvard University Press. pp. 140-165.
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  15. Zen Buddhism, Satori, Enlightenment & Truth.Peter Eastman - 2015
    Satori Zen is of immense interest to anyone pursuing authentic metaphysical knowledge because it claims to offer an astonishingly straightforward path to full Spiritual Enlightenment. And in terms of outright simplicity and immediate applicability, there is no other spiritual technique quite like it, in any other tradition anywhere. But does it do what it claims to do ? Can you really ‘power your way into heaven’ by brute meditative force ? And does this then mean that satori is equivalent to (...)
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  16. Momentary Return of the Cosmic Unconscious: The Nature of Zen/Chan Enlightenment.Ming Dong Gu - 2015 - Asian Philosophy 25 (4):402-417.
    Zen/Chan, which used to be a Far Eastern philosophy-cum-religion, has evolved into a global cultural phenomenon. Despite the many views expressed by numerous thinkers in the world, the consensus on Chan and Chan enlightenment remains an agnostic Oriental mysticism. By exploring Chan and enlightenment from a combined perspective of history, philosophy, psychology, religion and linguistics, this article proposes a hitherto unexpressed view. Chan enlightenment is a prenatal physico-psychological existence, which grows out of a fetal subject’s perception of the womb. Although (...)
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  17. The Chan Whip Anthology: A Companion to Zen Practice by Jeffrey L. Broughton.Steven Heine - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (4):1291-1293.
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  18. The Logic of Enlightenment.Dave S. Henley - 2015 - Iff Books.
    This work proposes a logical analysis for the kind of knowledge or insight provided by Buddhist enlightenment, which is often presented only in the form of contradictions and riddles. The comprehension of contradictions is perplexing to most western logic, and yet developed here is a theory demonstrating how a non truth-functional interpretation can be attached to certain naturalistic contradictions. In this way, the logical and psychological status of Enlightenment can be analysed in a manner consistent with the claims of much (...)
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  19. Does Even a Rat Have Buddha‐Nature? Analyzing Key‐Phrase Rhetoric for the Wu Gongan.Steven Heine - 2014 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (3-4):250-267.
    The Wu Gongan is primarily known for its minimalist expression based on Zhaozhou's “No” response to a monk's question of whether a dog has Buddha-nature. Crucial for the key-phrase method of meditation of Dahui Zonggao, the term Wu is not to be analyzed through logic or poetry. However, an overemphasis on the nondiscursive quality overlooks sophisticated rhetoric through metaphors used for the anxiety of doubt caused by Wu undermining conventional assumptions that is compared to a cornered rat; and the experience (...)
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  20. Mindfulness and Mindlessness in Early Chan.Robert Sharf - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (4):933-964.
    The Chan tradition is renowned as the “meditation” school of East Asia. Indeed, the Chinese term chan 禪 is an abbreviated transliteration of dhyāna, the Sanskrit term arguably closest to the modern English word “meditation.” Scholars typically date the emergence of this tradition to the early Tang dynasty , although Chan did not reach institutional maturity until the Song period . In time, Chinese Chan spread throughout East Asia, giving birth to the various Zen, Sŏn, and Thiền lineages of Japan, (...)
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  21. Park, Jin Y. And Gereon Kopf, Ed., Merleau-Ponty and Buddhism: Lanham: Lexington Books, 2010, 310 Pages.Nobuo Kazashi - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):105-108.
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  22. Buddhism and Postmodernity: Zen, Huayan, and the Possibility of Buddhist Postmodern Ethics (Review).Sor-Ching Low - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (3):417-420.
  23. Advaita Vedanta and Zen Buddhism: Deconstructive Modes of Spiritual Inquiry. [REVIEW]David R. Loy - 2012 - Sophia 51 (2):323-325.
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  24. Paradoxicality of Institution, De-Institutionalization and the Counter-Institutional: A Case Study in Classical Chinese Chan Buddhist Thought.Wang Youru - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (1):21-37.
    This article examines the issue of the paradoxicality of institution, de-institutionalization, or the counter-institutionalization in classical Chan thought by focusing on the texts of Hongzhou School. It first analyzes the problem of 20th century scholars in characterizing the Chan attitude toward institution as iconoclasts, and the problem of the recent tendency to return to images of the Chan masters as traditionalists, as opposed to iconoclasts. Both problems are examples of imposing an oppositional way of thinking on the Chan masters. The (...)
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  25. Zhu Xi’s Choice, Historical Criticism and Influence—An Analysis of Zhu Xi’s Relationship with Confucianism and Buddhism.Weixiang Ding - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (4):521-548.
    As a great synthesist for the School of Principles of the Northern and Southern Song dynasties, Zhu Xi’s influence over the School of Principles was demonstrated not only through his positive theoretical creation, but also through his choice and critical awareness. Zhu’s relationship with Confucianism and Buddhism is a typical case; and his activities, ranging from his research of Buddhism (the Chan School) in his early days to his farewell to the Chan School as a student of Li Dong from (...)
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  26. Washing the Dust From My Mirror: The Deconstruction of Buddhism—a Response to Bronwyn Finnigan.Chad Hansen - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (1):160-174.
    I thank Professors Finnigan and Garfield (Jay) and the editors of Philosophy East and West for inviting me to join in this discussion of Chinese Buddhism. I have not taken many opportunities in my career to write about Zen Buddhism and Daoism, although I have been fascinated by their connection. I remember quite clearly a discussion I had with Jay some years back in which I broached the idea that Daoism had contributed important dialectical steps leading to the formulation of (...)
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  27. The Linji Lu and the Creation of Chan Orthodoxy: The Development of Chan's Records of Sayings Literature (Review).Mario Poceski - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (2):395-399.
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  28. Wang, Youru, Linguistic Strategies in Daoist Zhuangzi and Chan Buddhism: The Other Way of Speaking: Routledge, London, 2003, 251 Pages.Ellen Y. Zhang - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (3):403-408.
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  29. The Hermeneutics of Chan Buddhism: Reading Koans From The Blue Cliff Record.Caifang Zhu - 2011 - Asian Philosophy 21 (4):373 - 393.
    Despite the fact that Chan, especially koan Chan is highly unconventional and perplexing, there are still some principles with which to interpret and appreciate the practice. Each of the five houses or lineages of Chan has its idiosyncratic hermeneutic rules. The Linji House has Linji si liao jian, si bin zhu and si zhao yong among others while the Yunmen House follows Yumen san ju as one of its house rules. Moreover, there is a general inner logic that seems to (...)
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  30. Fathering Your Father: The Zen of Fabrication in Tang Buddhism – by Alan Cole.Juhn Y. Ahn - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):513-516.
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  31. The Virtual and the Vacant—Emptiness and Knowledge in Chan and Daoism.Barry Allen - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):457-471.
  32. Clouds Thick, Whereabouts Unknown: Poems by Zen Monks of China.Charles Egan (ed.) - 2010 - Columbia University Press.
    Compiled by a leading scholar of Chinese poetry, _Clouds Thick, Whereabouts Unknown_ is the first collection of Chan poems to be situated within Chan thought and practice. Combined with exquisite paintings by Charles Chu, the anthology compellingly captures the ideological and literary nuances of works that were composed, paradoxically, to "say more by saying less," and creates an unparalleled experience for readers of all backgrounds. _Clouds Thick, Whereabouts Unknown_ includes verse composed by monk-poets of the eighth to the seventeenth centuries. (...)
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  33. Language and Emptiness in Chan Buddhism and the Early Heidegger.Eric S. Nelson - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (3):472-492.
  34. Toward a Philosophy of Chan Enlightenment: Linji’s Anti-Enlightenment Rhetoric.André Van Der Braak - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (2):231-247.
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  35. The Linji Lu and the Creation of Chan Orthodoxy (Review).Dirck Vorenkamp - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (4):558-560.
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  36. Being and Knowing in Wholeness Chinese Chan, Tibetan Dzogchen, and the Logic of Immediacy in Contemplation.Chinghui Jianying Ying - 2010 - Dissertation, Rice University
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  37. The Chan Interpretations of Wang Wei’s Poetry: A Critical Review. By Yang Jingqing.Kyle David Anderson - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (1):180-183.
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  38. The Chan Interpretations of Wang Wei's Poetry: A Critical Review – By Jingqing Yang.Kyledavid Anderson - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (1):180-183.
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  39. Zen, Emotion, and Social Engagement.Robert Feleppa - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (3):pp. 263-293.
    Some common conceptions of Buddhist meditative practice emphasize the elimination of emotion and desire in the interest of attaining tranquility and spiritual perfection. But to place too strong an emphasis on this is to miss an important social element emphasized by major figures in the Mahāyāna and Chan/Zen Buddhist traditions who are critical of these quietistic elements and who stress instead an understanding of an enlightenment that emphasizes enriched sociality and flexible readiness to engage, and not avoid, life's fluctuations in (...)
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  40. Ordinary Mind as the Way: The Hongzhou School and the Growth of Chan Buddhism (Review).Jinhua Jia - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (1):pp. 118-121.
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  41. The Chan Interpretations of Wang Wei’s Poetry: A Critical Review. By Yang Jingqing.Kyle David Anderson - 2008 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (3):540-543.
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  42. Psychological Attachment, No-Self and Chan Buddhist Mind Therapy.Wing-Shing Chan - 2008 - Contemporary Buddhism 9 (2):253-264.
    The role of Chan Buddhism for mind therapy is distinguished from psychotherapy by the objectives in diminishing or removing the deluded perceived self and the psychological self of attachments and cravings, which are considered as the more basic origins for psychological suffering and problems. The Buddhist concepts of impermanence, no-self and emptiness are discussed to explain the Buddhist explanation for human suffering. A four-stage theory is described to explain the common Buddhist meditation experience toward the realization of no-self. Removing psychological (...)
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  43. Zen : Does It Make Sense?Hal French - 2008 - In Jay Goulding (ed.), China-West Interculture: Toward the Philosophy of World Integration: Essays on Wu Kuang-Ming's Thinking. Global Scholarly Publications.
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  44. Koan Zen and Wittgenstein's Only Correct Method in Philosophy.Carl Hooper - 2007 - Asian Philosophy 17 (3):283 – 292.
    Koan Zen is a philosophical practice that bears a strong family resemblance to Wittgenstein's approach to philosophy. In this paper I hope to show that this resemblance is especially evident when we compare the Zen method of koan with Wittgenstein's suggestion, towards the end of his Tractatus, about what would constitute the only correct method in philosophy. Both koan Zen and Wittgenstein's method set limits to the reach of philosophical discourse. Each rules metaphysical speculation out of bounds. Neither, however, represents (...)
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  45. Haidege'er Yu Chan Dao de Kua Wen Hua Gou Tong: A Cross-Cultural Communication Between Martin Heidegger and Zen School/Daoism.Shen-Chon Lai - 2007 - Zong Jiao Wen Hua Chu Ban She.
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  46. Simon James, Zen Buddhism and Environmental Ethics.Ann A. Pang-White - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (2):191-194.
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  47. Space Metaphor as a Signifying Force in Chan Poems.Ming-Yu Tseng - 2007 - American Journal of Semiotics 23 (1/4):221-241.
    This paper analyzes how space is metaphorized in some Chan poems, and it investigates how space metaphor contributes to Chan culture. It concentrates onorientational metaphors, metaphor associated with an upward or/and a downward orientation. Orientational metaphors tend to be grounded in dichotomized thought, e.g., “GOOD IS UP” vs. “BAD IS DOWN”, “DIVINE IS UP” vs. “MORTAL IS DOWN”, etc. This paper will demonstrate that in some Chan poems, orientational metaphors do not function this way. Instead, what is foregrounded is the (...)
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  48. The Mind as the Essence of Words: A Linguistic Philosophical Analysis of the Classification Teaching of Yongming Yanshou. [REVIEW]Zhongwei Wu - 2007 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (3):336-344.
    Along with the Chan’s “linguistic turn”, the significance of sutras, which were despised and even regarded as the obstacle to complete enlightenment, became accepted by the Chan. Due to Yanshou’s contributions, the principle that emphasized the diversity of teaching in terms of the relationship between meaning and expression in the Sui and Tang Dynasties has been changed into a system which stressed the importance of the root/branches relationship of the mind and words. According to Yanshou, the conflict between the Chan (...)
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  49. Buddha is Dead: Nietzsche and the Dawn of European Zen.Manu Bazzano - 2006 - Sussex Academic Press.
    Drawing on Zen as well as on Nietzsche's thought and its ramifications in and for western culture, this book is a fervent call for a re-visioning of philosophy ...
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  50. Huineng (Hui-Neng).John M. Thompson - 2006 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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