This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

4906 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 4906
Material to categorize
  1. The Emotions in Early Chinese Philosophy, by Virág Curie. [REVIEW]Jing Hu - forthcoming - Australasian Journal of Philosophy:1-2.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Human Nature and Moral Sprouts: Mencius on the Pollyanna Problem.Richard T. Kim - 2018 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 99 (1):140-162.
    This article responds to a common criticism of Aristotelian naturalism known as the Pollyanna Problem, the objection that Aristotelian naturalism, when combined with recent empirical research, generates morally unacceptable conclusions. In developing a reply to this objection, I draw upon the conception of human nature developed by the ancient Chinese philosopher Mencius, and build up an account of ethical naturalism that provides a satisfying response to the Pollyanna Problem while also preserving what is most attractive about Aristotelian naturalism.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Early Buddhism and Taoism in China.Jiahe Liu & Dongfang Shao - 1992 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 12:35.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Contextualized Translation of the YijingI. [REVIEW]Kidder Smith - 1999 - Philosophy East and West 49 (3):377.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. A Song for One or Two: Music and the Concept of Art in Early China. [REVIEW]Bruce M. Wilson - 1985 - Philosophy East and West 35 (2):219.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6. Quantum Gravity and Taoist Cosmology: Exploring the Ancient Origins of Phenomenological String Theory.Steven M. Rosen - 2017 - Progress in Biophysics and Molecular Biology 131:34-60.
    In the author’s previous contribution to this journal (Rosen 2015), a phenomenological string theory was proposed based on qualitative topology and hypercomplex numbers. The current paper takes this further by delving into the ancient Chinese origin of phenomenological string theory. First, we discover a connection between the Klein bottle, which is crucial to the theory, and the Ho-t’u, a Chinese number archetype central to Taoist cosmology. The two structures are seen to mirror each other in expressing the psychophysical (phenomenological) action (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. The Radiance of Drift and Doubt: Zhuangzi and the Starting Point of Philosophical Discourse.John R. Williams - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (1):1-14.
    If one cannot establish givens, such as Platonic ideas, or determiners, such as Kantian categories, as a point of departure for philosophical inquiry, then how is philosophical inquiry to proceed in a non-question-begging manner? This, of course, is the familiar problem of grounding philosophical discourse. In this essay, I hope to offer a Zhuangzian solution—that is, a solution derived from analysis of the Zhuangzi 莊子 text—to this perennial philosophical problem. As a result, I hope to give the reader a critical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Jiang, Qing 蔣慶, Discussing Broadly Political Confucianism 廣論政治儒學.Philippe Brunozzi - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (1):125-128.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. “Benevolence-Righteousness” as Strategic Terminology: Reading Mengzi’s “Ren-Yi” Through Strategic Manuals.Ting-Mien Lee - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (1):15-34.
    This essay offers an experimental interpretation for Mengzi’s 孟子 ren-yi 仁義 discourses, reading them as strategic prescriptions akin to those presented in classical strategic manuals. However, rather than arguing that it is the correct interpretation of Mengzi, I use it to highlight the ambiguity of Mengzi’s discourses. This ambiguity, I argue, motivated Zhuangzi’s 莊子 criticisms of moral language abuse and rationalizes some early narratives about Mengzi.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Lee, Jung H., The Ethical Foundations of Early Daoism: Zhuangzi’s Unique Moral Vision.Machek David - 2017 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 16 (1):129-132.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Conserving Nature; Preserving Identity.Nicole Hassoun & D. Wong - 2015 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 42 (1-2):176-196.
    There are two broad approaches to environmental ethics. The “conservationist” approach on which we should conserve the environment when it is in our interest to do so and the “preservationist” approach on which we should preserve the environment even when it is not in our interest to do so. We propose a new “relational” approach that tells us to preserve nature as part of what makes us who we are or could be. Drawing from Confucian and Daoist texts, we argue (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  12. Trinity Theology and the Gift Economy of Forming a Spiritual Authority.Xia Kejun - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (4):270-285.
    Inspired by French scholar Marie-José Mondzain, this paper deals with the Holy Spirit and how the gift of the Spirit can provide for a different authority and economy. Xia also deals with the concept of icons and the Chinese concept of “face,” touching upon issues of identity and authority, and giving three Kantian “imperatives” for “spiritual” gift giving in the Chinese context.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Book Announcement - The Politics and Philosophy of Chinese Power: The Timeless and the Timely.Ferguson R. James & Dellios Rosita - unknown
    This book provides a timely analysis of the politics, philosophy, and history of Chinese power, focusing on social, strategic, and diplomatic trends that have shaped China for over three thousand years. Chinese elites have used the past to inform the present, but have also mobilized new ideas to address the country’s rapid transition to global power. China’s intellectual world can draw on a surprisingly pluralist legacy. When Chinese thinkers assess "power," they bring to bear their classical legacy, the military classics, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Confucian Marxism: A Reflection on Religion and Global Justice by Chen Weigang. [REVIEW]Wenning Mario - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):291-295.
    Confucian Marxism: A Reflection on Religion and Global Justice by Chen Weigang is part of the series “Ideas, History, and Modern China.” As the title suggests, Chen establishes a constructive encounter between Confucianism and Marxism, two schools of thought that are too rarely seated at the same table. By way of laying out a sociologically and philosophically informed framework, Chen develops a challenging and densely argued interpretation of what he aptly refers to as “peripheral liberal deformation”. Western capitalism has expanded (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. The Vanishing Wild Card: Challenges and Implications of Ziporyn's Zhuangzi.John R. Williams - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):177-191.
    In this essay, Brook Ziporyn’s reading of Zhuangzi 莊子 is explicated and broken down into what I take to be its two primary parts: first, Zhuangzi’s epistemological agnosticism and perspectivism, and second, Zhuangzi’s Wild Card. The former presents a unique set of philosophical problems through the specialized terminology of the classical Chinese lexicon, while the latter tries to remedy these problems. I take the first part of Zhuangzi’s position to be compelling and pertinent, while the second part is problematic. Carrying (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. On How to Construct a Confucian Democracy for Modern Times.Roger T. Ames - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):61-81.
    In his new book, Confucian Perfectionism: A Political Philosophy for Modern Times, Joseph Chan observes that Confucianism from its inception has suffered from a gap between its lofty aspirations and its historical reality—that is, there has been a severe discrepancy between its strong and resilient regulative ideals and a persistent pattern of traditionally weak social and governmental institutions and their practices. To overcome this historical disparity, Chan argues that contemporary Confucians should draw upon Western liberal institutions to the extent that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Seeking Ren in the Analects.Larson Di Fiori & Henry Rosemont Jr - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):96-116.
    Interpreting the graph ren 仁 has been the subject of much philological and philosophical study and speculation over the centuries among scholars both Chinese and Western, perhaps more than any other single graph. One major reason for the attention paid to the term is the general agreement that Confucius gave ren—a little-known term at the time—an ethical orientation in the Analects that it did not have earlier, an understanding of which seems to be a prerequisite for understanding his entire philosophy (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Confucian Justification of Limited Government: Comments on Joseph Chan's Confucian Perfectionism.Stephen C. Angle - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):15-24.
    I approach this encounter with Joseph Chan’s important work on Confucian perfectionism from a fundamentally sympathetic standpoint. Most basically, I agree with two of his key premises. Confucianism is more than a rich historical tradition: it is a live strand of political theory, able to criticize and contribute to our lives today. But for modern Confucianism to be plausible and attractive, it must find a way to embrace the idea of limited government or constitutionalism in a deeper fashion than it (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Education as a Human Right: A Confucian Perspective.Li Chenyang - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):37-46.
    Joseph Chan’s Confucian Perfectionism: A Political Philosophy for Modern Times is a milestone in the contemporary study of Confucian political philosophy. In this remarkable work, Chan presents his version of Confucian perfectionism, aiming to balance liberalism and Confucianism as a solution to reconstructing a political philosophy in response to contemporary challenges. I am sympathetic to much of what Chan has to say in the book. I agree that, rather than merely being an ethical theory, Confucianism can and should have a (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. Socrates Arabus Life and Teachings.Ilai Alon - 1995 - The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Special Topic: Filial Piety: The Root of Morality or the Source of Corruption? Is Confucian Ethics a “Consanguinism”?Guo Qiyong - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (1):21-37.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  22. Clarifying Singer's Golden Rule.James A. Gould - 1968 - Critica 2 (6):95-101.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Yan Fu and the Translation of “Individualism” in Modern China.Max Ko-wu Huang - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (3):208-222.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTIn this article, Huang stresses the important role played by the Chinese cultural context in the historical process of translation of Western concepts. Huang exemplifies this point through an analysis of Yan Fu’s translation of “individualism.”.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Imagining Confucius: Paradigmatic Characters and Virtue Ethics.Tan S. -H. - unknown
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Zhuangzi’s Philosophy of Thing.Sai Hang Kwok - 2016 - Asian Philosophy 26 (4):294-310.
    It is usually believed that the concept of ‘qiwu 齊物’ in the Zhuangzi means ‘equalizing things’. This reading of the Zhuangzi, however, presupposes that things are originally separated and exist independently. The equality of things is just a mental construct in a specific state of mind. In this paper, we will argue that this reading does not stand; what Zhuangzi does in the ‘Qiwulun 齊物論’is to examine how myriad things are created from the original oneness. According to Zhuangzi’s philosophy of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. A Critique of Confucius’ Philosophy.Michael Vincent Yang - 2016 - Asian Philosophy 26 (4):354-374.
    Throughout the millennia since the composition of the Analects, orthodox scholars have maintained that Confucius faithfully passed down the thought of early eras, particularly those of Yao and Shun: ‘I transmit but do not create ideas.’ This paper shows that Confucius actually subverted the essence of orthodox thought represented mainly by Yao and Shun. His subversion of orthodox thought compels perforce the idea of ‘ren,’ which concerns itself with the human world, to stand out with the near exclusion of otherworldliness (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Confucianism, Human Dignity, and Reverence for Life.Erin M. Cline - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):607-617.
  28. Thinking Through Hall and Ames: On the Art of Comparative Philosophy.Warren G. Frisina - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):563-574.
    With the publication of their first collaborative book Thinking Through Confucius, David Hall and Roger Ames launched a comparative philosophical project juxtaposing American pragmatism and Chinese Confucianism. This essay focuses on the role pragmatic assumptions play in Hall’s and Ames’s announced goal of opening a “new route” into Chinese intellectual history. Hall and Ames aim to teach scholars whose scholarly sensibilities have been formed in the West what they must acknowledge about their own traditions before they can engage Chinese thinkers (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  29. Studying Confucian Thought From the Inside Out.Kwong-loi Shun - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):511-532.
    The philosophical study of Confucian thought seeks to both understand the nature of Confucian thought in its historical and cultural context and relate it in an intellectually fruitful manner to contemporary philosophical discourse. Someone engaged in such a study will be pulled inward toward approximating the perspectives of the Confucian thinkers set in the context of their concerns and activities, and pulled outward away from the Confucians’ world of ideas to relate them to our present concerns and interests, specifically those (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. The Other Side of the Coin—Response to the Comments on My Paper on a Confucian Approach to Human Dignity.Peimin Ni - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):631-637.
  31. Life According to Television. Implications of Genre-Specific Cultivation Effects: The Gratification/Cultivation Model.Patrick Rössler & Helena Bilandzic - 2004 - Communications 29 (3):295-326.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. Mencius and the Stoics – Tui and Oikeiôsis.R. A. H. King - 2015 - In The Good Life and Conceptions of Life in Early China and Graeco-Roman Antiquity. De Gruyter. pp. 341-362.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Filial Piety in Plato.Richard Stalley - 2015 - In R. A. H. King (ed.), The Good Life and Conceptions of Life in Early China and Graeco-Roman Antiquity. De Gruyter. pp. 247-264.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. The Ideas of Human Nature in Early China.Guo Yi - 2015 - In R. A. H. King (ed.), The Good Life and Conceptions of Life in Early China and Graeco-Roman Antiquity. De Gruyter. pp. 93-116.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. On The Contingency of Confucius' Emergent Tao.Roger T. Ames - 1984 - NTU Philosophical Review 7:117-140.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Is the Mind in Mencius' Philosophy Self-Sufficient for Moral Cultivation?Wing-wah Chan - 1998 - NTU Philosophical Review 21:193-247.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Reflections on the Concept of “Law” of Shang Yang From the Perspective of Political Philosophy: Function, Value, and Spirit of the “Rule of Law”.Wu Baoping & Lin Cunguang - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):125-137.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article argues that Shang Yang’s philosophy of law was not only a means to enrich the state and strengthen its army, but also envisioned the orderly rule of all All-under-Heaven. Through a fair, universal, and reliable use of rewards, punishments, and also teaching, this vision of laws could ultimately lead to the promotion of moral values, popular consensus, and people’s self-governance. While the authors admit that in Shang Yang’s own historical context, law was no more than a tool (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Book of Lord Shang and Elevation of Confucianism in the Han—Including the Discussion of the Conflict Between Shang Yang, His School, and the Confucians.Li Cunshan - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):112-124.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article presents a counterintuitive view that the rise of Confucianism in the Han dynasty is indebted to the Book of Lord Shang. It analyzes chapter 7, “Opening the blocked,” and shows that the chapter can be read as promoting a combination of force and morality. The sophisticated historical view of this chapter solves apparent contradictions between societies based on family ties, meritocracy, and monarchic power by showing how new levels of social development inevitably open up when old paths (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. On the Composition of the “Attracting the People” Chapter of the Book of Lord Shang.Tong Weimin - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):138-151.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article argues on the basis of internal and external evidence that chapter 15 “Attracting the people” was written by a follower of Shang Yang in the later years of King Zhao of Qin. While the idea of attracting immigrants can be traced back to Shang Yang himself, the article dates the chapter seventy-eight years after his death.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. Progress or Change? Rethinking the Historical Outlook of the Book of Lord Shang.Zhang Linxiang - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):90-111.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article is a reflection on the nature of “changing with the times” that is put forward in the Book of Lord Shang. The author challenges the modern, predominantly Marxist, portrayal of Shang Yang as the exceptional Warring States master promoting a progressive view of history. The Book of Lord Shang does not prioritize future over the present or present over the past, nor does it envision a large-scale rational understanding of the historical trends, nor the possibility to improve (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. Shang Yang as a Historical Personality and as a Symbol.Zeng Zhenyu - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):69-89.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article gives an overview of Shang Yang portrayals in four stages: from Han Fei’s sympathetic yet balanced assessment, passing over a variety of conflicting Han views, skipping through “the two millennia of vilification” to Zhang Taiyan’s rediscovery of Shang Yang, and ending up at the Shang Yang fervor of the 1970s. Zeng shows how the figure of Shang Yang keeps popping up with a certain regularity, inciting conflicts about his legacy. He also argues that at each flare of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. Chinese Academic Views on Shang Yang Since the Open-Up-and-Reform Era.Yuri Pines & Carine Defoort - 2016 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):59-68.
    ABSTRACTThe Book of Lord Shang attributed to Shang Yang is one of the most controversial products of ideological debates in pre-imperial China. Forty years ago, Li Yu-ning summarized previous rounds of debates that peaked with the Shang Yang fervor of the early 1970s. The present article takes over where she ended, further exploring trends in studies of the Book of Lord Shang since the Open-up-and-Reform Era. The paper shows that despite a clear tendency of depoliticization of these studies, scholars are (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Mestari Kongin Keskustelut: Kungfutselaisuuden Ydinolemus by Jyrki Kallio.Matti Nojonen - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1368-1373.
    The Discourses of Master Kong: The Essence of Confucianism, written in Finnish by Jyrki Kallio, is a laudable work on Confucianism not only for students of Chinese philosophy but for a broader audience as well. The book is the first comprehensive work on Confucianism in the Finnish language: it comprises an annotated and critical complete translation of the Analects as well as longer selected and annotated translations from the Guodian corpus and central early Confucian classics such as the Mengzi and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. Metaphor and Metaphilosophy: Philosophy as Combat, Play, and Aesthetic Experience by Sarah A. Mattice.Ann A. Pang-White - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1374-1376.
    What is philosophy? What is metaphor? Could thinking take place metaphorically? If one follows the mainstream Western definition of philosophy, the answer to the latter question would certainly be negative. Metaphors are perceived as primitive, pre-analytical, and imprecise—thus pre-philosophical! Drawing on multiple cross-cultural resources, Metaphor and Metaphilosophy: Philosophy as Combat, Play, and Aesthetic Experience by Sarah A. Mattice insightfully challenges this widespread assumption in the current...
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Heaven and Earth Are Not Humane: The Problem of Evil in Classical Chinese Philosophy by Franklin Perkins.Bongrae Seok - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1377-1380.
    Why do bad things happen to good people? Why isn’t good moral intention always rewarded? Franklin Perkins discusses these challenging questions about good and evil in his recent book Heaven and Earth Are not Humane: The Problem of Evil in Classical Chinese Philosophy. As the title suggests, Perkins focuses on the unique Chinese notion of heaven and its related philosophical issues of undeserved misfortune and limited moral efficacy. The subtitle of the book is equally intriguing. Perkins discusses these philosophical issues (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. Philosophical Reflections on the "Fish Happiness" Anecdote.Kirill O. Thompson - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1307-1318.
    The “Fish Happiness” anecdote in the Zhuangzi is a literary gem, a well-wrought urn, which simultaneously reflects and informs the “Autumn Floods” chapter,1 as well as the text as a whole.2 Despite its polish and surface clarity, the anecdote has afforded a variety of readings. Its points and assumptions tend to be muted or understated in pun, so the reader is pressed to bring his or her own intellectual wits to bear. Indeed, one wonders if the fish happiness anecdote wasn’t (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Creation and Causality in Chinese-Jesuit Polemical Literature.Charles B. Jones - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1251-1272.
    In Giulio Aleni’s The True Source of the Myriad Things chapter 4 contains the following question and answer:One might say that it is like seeds: from only one seed the subsequent branches, trunk, and blossoms are produced in a truly spontaneous manner. There need not be an external creator. All things have their own inherent natures, and they come forth on the basis of their inherent natures spontaneously; why must they have some external maker?1I [i.e., Aleni] say: The sprouting of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Wittgenstein and the Analects on the Ethics of Clarification.Thomas D. Carroll - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1148-1167.
    At first glance, it might seem an odd pairing: the Analects and Wittgenstein. Comparison between a classical Chinese philosophical text, whose primary topics were the cultivation of xiao and he, and the corpus of an early to mid-twentieth-century Austrian philosopher, whose primary topics had to do with logic, language, and the nature of philosophy, does not obviously recommend itself. Yet, I contend in this article that there is much to be gained from careful comparison between these two very different pictures (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  49. Evaluative Desire in the Mencius.Sin Yee Chan - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 66 (4):1168-1195.
    The concept of yu 欲 is an under-explored concept in the scholarship on early Confucianism. Perhaps due to the focus on the term “the yu of eyes and ears,” a common term in early Chinese philosophy denoting desires for sensual gratification, or on the Daoist stance on desires, many scholars tend to emphasize the negative and the hedonistic connotations of the term. For example, Chad Hansen notes that the early Confucians do not “make desires central in their account of human (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  50. Classical Confucian Political Thought: A New Interpretation.Loubna El Amine - unknown
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
1 — 50 / 4906