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  1. The Price of Ritual.Peter Ackermann - 2013 - Paragrana 22 (1).
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  2. Minford, John, Trans., I Ching : The Book of Change.Joseph A. Adler - 2015 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (1):147-152.
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  3. Varieties of Spiritual Experience: Shen in Neo-Confucian Discourse.Joseph A. Adler - 2003 - In Weiming Tu & Mary Evelyn Tucker (eds.), Confucian Spirituality. Crossroad Pub. Company. pp. 2--120.
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  4. Liu Ta Kuan Nien Chen, Shan, Mei: Wo Men Chü I Tso P an Tuan Ti Kuan Nien ; Tzu Yu, P Ing Teng, Cheng I: Wo Men Chü I Hsing Tung Ti Kuan Nien.Mortimer Jerome Adler - 1986 - Lien Ching Ch U Pan She Shih Yeh Kung Ssu.
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  5. I Pan Ta Hsüeh Sheng Chih Jen Sheng Kuan.Shang-ssu Ts ai - 1981 - S.N.
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  6. Zhe Xue Xuan Ji.Siqi Ai - 1950
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  7. Wang Shouren's Idealist Pantheistic World View.Deng Aimin - 1986 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 17 (4):35-83.
    Wang Shouren affirmed that "the teachings of the sages are nothing but the teaching of mind" . He believed that Lu Jiuyuan, in proposing the formulation that the mind equals principle, continued the legacy of the teaching of the mind that had begun in China with the teaching of Yao, Shun, and Yu and which was exemplified in the saying "The human mind is always in peril; the mind of the natural Way is always hidden; emphasize essentiality, emphasize unity; maintain (...)
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  8. Roger T. Ames's Confucian Role Ethics: A Model of Treating the Text on Its Own Terms.William Keli’I. Akina - 2012 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 7 (4):600-603.
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  9. Process Ecology and the "Ideal"Dao.F. O. X. Alan - 2005 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (1):47–57.
  10. The Babylonian Sage Ut-Napištim Rûqu.W. Albright - 1918 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 38:60-65.
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  11. A Parallel Between Indic And Babylonian Sacrificial Ritual.W. Albright & P. Dumont - 1934 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 54 (2):107-128.
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  12. Different Paths, Same Mountain: Daoism, Ecology and the New Paradigm of Science.Anthony Alexander - unknown
    Western physics in the 18th century was fundamental in establishing basic concepts in the study of economics. However, this form of physics has now been comprehensively displaced by progress within Western science, notably the rise of the new paradigm of science formalised as systems theory. This utilises new mathematical techniques incorporating Newtonian science within a far larger field of understanding that also includes the complex, unpredicateble and fluid aspects of the real world. However, the institutions of the modern world, especially (...)
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  13. The Way of Water and Sprouts of Virtue.Sarah Allan - 1997
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  14. Confucians.Barry Allen - 2015 - In Vanishing Into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition. Harvard University Press. pp. 12-65.
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  15. War as a Problem of Knowledge: Theory of Knowledge in China’s Military Philosophy.Barry Allen - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (1):1-17.
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  16. Daoism and Chinese Martial Arts.Barry Allen - 2014 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 13 (2):251-266.
    The now-global phenomenon of Asian martial arts traces back to something that began in China. The idea the Chinese communicated was the dual cultivation of the spiritual and the martial, each perfected in the other, with the proof of perfection being an effortless mastery of violence. I look at one phase of the interaction between Asian martial arts and Chinese thought, with a reading of the Zhuangzi 莊子 and the Daodejing 道德經 from a martial arts perspective. I do not claim (...)
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  17. Review of I and Tao: Martin Buber's Encounter with Chuang Tzu by Jonathan R. Herman. [REVIEW]Robert Allinson - 1998 - Philosophy East and West 48 (3):529-534.
    This review confirms Herman’s work as a praiseworthy contribution to East-West and comparative philosophical literature. Due credit is given to Herman for providing English readers with access to Buber’s commentary on, a personal translation of, the Chuang-Tzu; Herman’s insight into the later influence of I and Thou on Buber’s understanding of Chuang-Tzu and Taoism is also appropriately commended. In latter half of this review, constructive criticisms of Herman’s work are put forward, such as formatting inconsistencies, a tendency toward verbosity and (...)
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  18. Zhuangzi and Buber in Dialogue: A Lesson in Practicing Integrative Philosophy.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):547-562.
    I put forward the case that comparative philosophy is best practiced as integrative philosophy. The model for integrative philosophy employed embodies its own methodology, integrating the Hegelian dialectic and the Yin-Yang 陰陽, cyclical model of change illustrated by the Yijing 易經 as strategies for integrating philosophical traditions. As an object lesson, I integrate a real, historical one-way encounter with an imagined two-way encounter between Martin Buber and Zhuangzi 莊子, to provide a counter-example to replace Huntington’s clash of civilizations with a (...)
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  19. Of Fish, Butterflies and Birds: Relativism and Nonrelative Valuation in the Zhuangzi.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2015 - Asian Philosophy 25 (3):238-252.
    I argue that the main theme of the Zhuangzi is that of spiritual transformation. If there is no such theme in the Zhuangzi, it becomes an obscure text with relativistic viewpoints contradicting statements and stories designed to lead the reader to a state of spiritual transformation. I propose to reveal the coherence of the deep structure of the text by clearly dividing relativistic statements designed to break down fixed viewpoints from statements, anecdotes, paradoxes and metaphors designed to lead the reader (...)
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  20. Wittgenstein, Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu: The Art of Circumlocution.Robert Elliott Allinson - 2007 - Asian Philosophy 17 (1):97 – 108.
    Where Western philosophy ends, with the limits of language, marks the beginning of Eastern philosophy. The Tao de jing of Laozi begins with the limitations of language and then proceeds from that as a starting point. On the other hand, the limitation of language marks the end of Wittgenstein's cogitations. In contrast to Wittgenstein, who thought that one should remain silent about that which cannot be put into words, the message of the Zhuangzi is that one can speak about that (...)
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  21. Socrates Arabus: Life and Teachings.Ilai Alon - 1997 - Philosophy East and West 47:290-290.
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  22. The Moral Fool: A Case for Amorality by Hans-Georg Moeller.Wayne Alt - 2015 - Philosophy East and West 65 (1):331-341.
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  23. On How to Construct a Confucian Democracy for Modern Times.Roger T. Ames - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):61-81.
    In his new book, Confucian Perfectionism: A Political Philosophy for Modern Times, Joseph Chan observes that Confucianism from its inception has suffered from a gap between its lofty aspirations and its historical reality—that is, there has been a severe discrepancy between its strong and resilient regulative ideals and a persistent pattern of traditionally weak social and governmental institutions and their practices. To overcome this historical disparity, Chan argues that contemporary Confucians should draw upon Western liberal institutions to the extent that (...)
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  24. David L. Hall (1937-2001).Roger T. Ames - 2002 - Philosophy East and West 52 (3):277-280.
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  25. Remembering David Hall: David L. Hall (1937-2001).Roger T. Ames - 2002 - Philosophy East and West 52 (3):277-280.
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  26. Death as Transformation in Classical Daoism.Roger T. Ames - 1998 - In J. E. Malpas & Robert C. Solomon (eds.), Death and Philosophy. Routledge. pp. 57--70.
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  27. Editor's Note on A. C. Graham Special Feature.Roger T. Ames - 1992 - Philosophy East and West 42 (1):iv-iv.
  28. On The Contingency of Confucius' Emergent Tao.Roger T. Ames - 1984 - NTU Philosophical Review 7:117-140.
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  29. The Meaning of Body in Classical Chinese Thought.Roger T. Ames - 1984 - International Philosophical Quarterly 24 (1):39-54.
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  30. The Art of Rulership: A Study in Ancient Chinese Political Thought.Roger T. Ames - 1983 - Philosophy East and West 38 (2):197-200.
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  31. Nho Giáo.Trong Kim Tr ân - 1971 - Bão Giáo-Duc, Trung-Tâm Hoc-Liãeu.
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  32. Ke Xue Zhe Xue Xin Jin Zhan: Cong Zheng Shi Dao Jian Gou = Kexue Zhexue Xinjinzhan: Cong Zhengshi Dao Jiangou.Weifu An - 2012 - Shanghai Ren Min Chu Ban She.
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  33. Title Index to Daoist Collections (Review).Poul Andersen - 2004 - Philosophy East and West 54 (3):407-411.
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  34. The Seasonal Structure Underlying the Arrangement of Hexagrams in the Yijing'.Aw Anderson - 1990 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 17 (3):275-299.
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  35. Bryan W. Van Norden.Douglas R. Anderson - 1992 - Journal of Philosophy 89 (4).
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  36. The Golden Rule: Not So Golden Anymore.Stephen Anderson - forthcoming - Philosophy Now.
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  37. Ethics: The Golden Rule: Not So Golden Anymore.Stephen Anderson - 2009 - Philosophy Now 74:26-29.
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  38. Smith, Huston Review of the Essential Writings of Schuon, Frithjof-Comment.T. Anderson - 1991 - Philosophy East and West 41 (3):365-368.
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  39. Comment on Huston Smith's Review of "the Essential Writings of Frithjof Schuon".Tyson Anderson - 1991 - Philosophy East and West 41 (3):365-368.
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  40. Ju Tao Shih Yü Nei Tsai Ch Ao Yüeh Wen T I.I. -Chieh T. Ang - 1991
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  41. Kuo Hsiang Yü Wei Chin Hsüan Hsüeh.I. -Chieh T. Ang - 1991 - Ku Feng Ch U Pan She.
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  42. Reply to Justin Tiwald.Stephen Angle - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):237-239.
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  43. Confucian Justification of Limited Government: Comments on Joseph Chan's Confucian Perfectionism.Stephen C. Angle - 2016 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):15-24.
    I approach this encounter with Joseph Chan’s important work on Confucian perfectionism from a fundamentally sympathetic standpoint. Most basically, I agree with two of his key premises. Confucianism is more than a rich historical tradition: it is a live strand of political theory, able to criticize and contribute to our lives today. But for modern Confucianism to be plausible and attractive, it must find a way to embrace the idea of limited government or constitutionalism in a deeper fashion than it (...)
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  44. A Confucian Constitutional Order: How China's Ancient Past Can Shape Its Political Future by Jiang Qing, Translated by Edmund Ryden, Edited by Daniel A. Bell and Ruiping Fan (Review).Stephen C. Angle - 2014 - Philosophy East and West 64 (2):502-506.
    How important is Jiang Qing, whose extraordinary proposals for political change make up the core of the new book A Confucian Constitutional Order: How China’s Ancient Past Can Shape Its Political Future? In his Introduction to the volume, co-editor Daniel Bell maintains that Jiang’s views are “intensely controversial” and that conversations about political reform in China rarely fail to turn to Jiang’s proposals. At least in my experience, this is something of an exaggeration. Chinese political thinking today is highly pluralistic, (...)
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  45. Ritual and Reverence in Ancient China and Today. [REVIEW]Stephen C. Angle - 2005 - Philosophy East and West 55 (3):471-479.
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  46. Public Policy and Globalization in Hawaii.Ibrahim G. Aoudé, Jim Brewer, Ulla Hasager, Elliot Higa, Marion Kelly, Jon K. Matsuoka, Luciano Minerbi, Li‘ana M. Petranek, Ira Rohter & Robert H. Stauffer - 2013 - Philosophy East and West 63 (2).
  47. Talion and the Golden Rule.R. G. Apresian - 2002 - Russian Studies in Philosophy 41 (1):46-64.
    Talion and the Golden Rule are usually considered expressions of successive historical stages in the development of morality. The conventional wisdom is that talion-lex talionis-is a form of social control corresponding to a fairly early stage of the development of human communities. From a purely historical point of view, talion is a rule of punishment for crime according to which the retribution should strictly correspond to the harm inflicted. The rule goes back to the archaic custom of blood vengeance which (...)
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  48. Filial Morality.David Archard - 1996 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 77 (3):179-192.
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  49. The Effects of Ritual.Michael Argyle - 2003 - Archive for the Psychology of Religion 24 (1):167-179.
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  50. K'ung-Ts'ung-Tzu, the K'ung Family Masters' Anthology: A Study and Translation of Chapters 1-10, 12-14.Yoav Ariel - 1990 - Philosophy East and West 40 (4):571-573.
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