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  1. added 2019-02-28
    Individualism in Early China: Human Agency and the Self in Thought and Politics by Erica Fox Brindley. [REVIEW]Hagop Sarkissian - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (3):408-410.
    Review of Individualism in Early China: Human Agency and the Self in Thought and Politics by Erica Fox Brindley.
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  2. added 2017-12-14
    Minds, Programs, and Chinese Philosophers: A Chinese Perspective on the Chinese Room.Koji Tanaka - 2004 - Sophia 43 (1):61-72.
    The paper is concerned with John Searle’s famous Chinese room argument. Despite being objected to by some, Searle’s Chinese room argument appears very appealing. This is because Searle’s argument is based on an intuition about the mind that ‘we’ all seem to share. Ironically, however, Chinese philosophers don’t seem to share this same intuition. The paper begins by first analysing Searle’s Chinee room argument. It then introduces what can be seen as the (implicit) Chinese view of the mind. Lastly, it (...)
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  3. added 2017-02-27
    Chinese Perspectives on Free Will.Christian Helmut Wenzel & Marchal Kai - 2017 - In Kevin Timpe, Meghan Griffith & Neil Levy (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Free Will. Routledge. pp. 374-388.
    The problem of free will as it is know in Western philosophical traditions is hardly known in China. Considering how central the problem is in the West, this is a remarkable fact. We try to explain this, and we offer insights into discussions within Chinese traditions that we think are related, not historically but regarding the issues discussed. Thus we introduce four central Chinese concepts, namely: (1) xīn 心 (heart, heart-mind), (2) xìng 性 (human nature, characteristic tendencies, inborn capacity), (3) (...)
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  4. added 2017-01-25
    Seeing the Dao: Conceptual Metaphors and the Philosophy of Religion.Victoria S. Harrison - 2015 - Religious Studies 51 (3):307-322.
    This paper suggests that different philosophical traditions have developed and matured around particular conceptual metaphors. It proposes that conceptual metaphor theory provides a useful tool with which to think about different world philosophical traditions, as it can reveal the deep structure of networks of ideas. Conceptual metaphors are not just linguistic devices; rather they organize whole networks of thought, experience, and activity. This idea is explored and special attention paid to the role of those conceptual metaphors that structure ways of (...)
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  5. added 2016-12-08
    The Theory of the Dao and Taiji: A Chinese Model of the Mind.Ming Dong Gu - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (1):157-175.
  6. added 2016-12-08
    An Exposition of Zhou Yi Studies in Modern Neo-Confucianism.Guo Qiyong - 2006 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (2):185-203.
    The representatives of modern Neo-Confucianism all greatly value Yi Zhuan and regard it as one of their spiritual resources, and give their own creative interpretations and transformations. Xiong Shili's ontological-cosmological theory takes "qian yuan" as its center; Ma Yifu has a theory of ontology-cultivation centered on "nature-principle"; Fang Dongmei has a metaphysics of production and reproduction; Mou Zongsan takes the view of "completely knowing the fathomless and understanding transformation" as a moral metaphysics; and in Tang Junyi there is a theory (...)
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  7. added 2015-09-21
    Collective Wisdom and Civilization: Revitalizing Ancient Wisdom Traditions.Thomas Kiefer - 2015 - Comparative Civilizations Review 72.
    I argue that, in one sense, collective wisdom can save civilization. But in a more important sense, collective wisdom should be understood as a form of civilization, as the result and expression of a moral civilizing-process that comes about through the creation and transmission of collective interpretations of human experience and human nature. Collective wisdom traditions function in this manner by providing an interpretation of what it means to be human and what thoughts, skills, and actions are required to live (...)
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  8. added 2015-09-16
    On Confucius.Peimin Ni - 2002 - Wadsworth.
  9. added 2015-09-11
    Mortality in Traditional Chinese Thought, Amy Olberding and Philip J. Ivanhoe. [REVIEW]Mathew A. Foust - 2013 - Mortality 18 (3):321-322.
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  10. added 2015-09-10
    Self as Container? Metaphors We Lose By in Understanding Early China.Jane Geaney - 2011 - Antiquorum Philosophia 5:11-30.
    As part of a trend in modern cognitive science, cognitive linguist, George Lakoff, and philosopher, Mark Johnson claim to provide a biologically-based account of subsymbolic meaningful experiences. They argue that human beings understand objects by extrapolating from their sensory motor activities and primary perceptions. Lakoff and Johnson’s writings have generated a good deal of interest among scholars of Early China because they maintain that “our common embodiment allows for common stable truths.” Although there are many grounds on which Lakoff and (...)
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  11. added 2015-04-04
    T'ung Shu-Yeh, The Tso-Chuan, And Early Chinese History. [REVIEW]Jay Sailey - 1984 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 104 (3):529-536.
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  12. added 2015-04-04
    Humorous Anecdotes in Chinese Historical Texts.Alvin P. Cohen - 1976 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 96 (1):121-124.
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  13. added 2015-03-25
    Treatise on the Virtues. By St. Thomas Aquinas. Tr. John A. Oesterle. [REVIEW]Lee C. Rice - 1968 - Modern Schoolman 46 (1):90-90.
  14. added 2015-03-24
    A Brief Explanation of the Chu Bamboo Slips.Zheng Wangeng - 2006 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 1 (3):418-431.
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  15. added 2015-03-23
    New Products and Applications of Bamboo. Paper Presented During the National Symposium on the Sustainability of the Bamboo Industry Held at the ERDB Auditorium, College.E. D. Bello & Z. B. Espiloy - forthcoming - Laguna.
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  16. added 2015-03-23
    中国古代先哲的时空观研究 Study of Time-Space for Ancient Chinese Philosophers.熊 辉 - 2012 - Advances in Philosophy 1 (2):5-8.
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  17. added 2015-03-23
    Chinese Philosophy in Excavated Early Texts.Chung-Ying Cheng & Franklin Perkins - 2011 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    T he nine papers of this Supplement on these significant issues and important ideas are closely accentuated and critically discussed by well-established specialists, philosophers and historians, from various relevant disciplines of study.
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  18. added 2014-05-15
    Laughing in Chinese. [REVIEW]Robert Keith Shaw & Guo-Hai Chen - 2014 - Humor 27 (1):167-170.
    Santangelo, Paulo (ed.). 2012.Laughing in Chinese.Rome: Aracne Editrice. 472pp. €26. ISBN 97888 548 46203. This book of 15 papers is divided into four parts: humor in Chinese and Japanese literary works, examples of comic literature, the moral involvement of humor, and the psychology of humor. Santangelo provides a substantial introduction to smiles and laughter in the Chinese context and also to the papers in his book (pp. 5–28). This structure lends itself to a description and analysis of smiling and laughing (...)
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  19. added 2014-04-02
    Benti, Practice and State: On the Doctrine of Mind in the Four Chapters of Guanzi. [REVIEW]Peng Peng - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (4):549-564.
    “ Xin 心 (Mind)” is one of the key concepts in the four chapters of Guanzi . Together with Dao, qi 气 (air, or gas) and de 德 (virtue), the four concepts constitute a complete system of the learning of mind which is composed of the theory of benti 本体 (root and body), the theory of practice and the theory of spiritual state. Guanzi differentiates the two basic layers of mind—the essence and the function. It tries to attain a state (...)
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  20. added 2014-04-02
    Harmony (He) and Gender in Early Chinese Thought.Bret Hinsch - 1995 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (2):109-128.
  21. added 2014-04-02
    Confucian Ethics of the Axial Age: A Reconstruction Under the Aspect of the Breakthrough Toward Postconventional Thinking by Heiner Roetz.Kwong-Loi Shun - 1995 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 22 (3):351-362.
  22. added 2014-04-01
    The Classic of Changes: A New Translation of the I Ching as Interpreted by Wang Bi Translated by Richard John Lynn.J. Lee Schroeder - 1996 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 23 (3):369-380.
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  23. added 2014-04-01
    Philosophical Sense and Classical Chinese Thought.Wayne Alt - 1996 - Asian Philosophy 6 (2):155 – 160.
    A Daoist Theory of Chinese Thought Chad Hansen, 1992 New York; Oxford University Press xvi + 448 pp., hb $65.00.
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  24. added 2014-03-30
    Guodian: The Newly Discovered Seeds of Chinese Religious and Political Philosophy.Kenneth W. Holloway - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    In 300 BCE, the tutor of the heir-apparent to the Chu throne was laid to rest in a tomb at Jingmen, Hubei province in central China. A corpus of bamboo-strip texts that recorded the philosophical teachings of an era was buried with him. The tomb was sealed, and China quickly became the theater of the Qin conquest, an event that proved to be one of the most significant in ancient history. For over two millennia, the texts were forgotten. But in (...)
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  25. added 2014-03-30
    Early Chinese Texts A Bibliographical Guide. Edited by Michael Loewe.Lauren Pfster - 1997 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 24 (1):129-133.
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  26. added 2014-03-30
    The Emergence of Concepts of a Sentence in Ancient Greek and in Ancient Chinese Philosophy1.Richard Bosley - 1997 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 24 (2):209-229.
  27. added 2014-03-29
    Time as Emotion Vs. Time as Moralization: Whitehead and the Yijing.Linyu Gu - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (2):209-236.
  28. added 2014-03-29
    The Place of the Yijing in World Culture: Some Historical and Contemporary Perspectives.Richard J. Smith - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (4):391-422.
  29. added 2014-03-29
    Original Ontological Roots of Ancient Chinese Philosophy.Marina Čarnogurská - 1998 - Asian Philosophy 8 (3):203-213.
    Abstract This is a new attempt at an analysis of classical Chinese (Confucian) ethics which is still inappropriately explained by Western philosophy as a traditional normative ethical system. Special conditions of ancient Chinese anthropogeny and social and economic development gave rise in this cultural region to an original theory of being, which in modern terminology can be referred to as an ontological model of a fundamental Yin?Yang dialectic of a bipolar and non?homogeneous synergy of being. This theory of being became (...)
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  30. added 2014-03-29
    Justification of War in Ancient China.James A. Stroble - 1998 - Asian Philosophy 8 (3):165 – 190.
    The most defensible justifications of war in the European intellectual tradition hold that war is instrumentally necessary for the maintenance of peace and order. An investigation of Ancient Chinese philosophical attitudes towards war calls this assumption into question. The closest parallel to an instrumental concept of war is found in the Legalist school, but historical experience in China has rejected this. The Confucian school, especially Mencius and Xunxi, insists that war is not instrumental in creating social order, but derives from (...)
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  31. added 2014-03-28
    Philosophy of the Yi: Unity and Dialectics.Zhongying Cheng & On Cho Ng (eds.) - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This volume, an assemblage of essays previously published in the Journal of Chinese Philosophy, conveniently and strategically brings together some of the trenchant interpretations and analyses of the salient, structural aspects of the philosophy of the Yijing. They reveal how the ancient Classic offers a graphically vivid and conceptually dynamic dramaturgy of the ways in which the natural world works in conjunction with the human one. Its cosmological architectonics and philosophical worldview continue to have enormous purchase on our current imagination, (...)
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  32. added 2014-03-28
    Chinese Philosophy in Excavated Early Texts.Zhongying Cheng & Franklin Perkins (eds.) - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    T he nine papers of this Supplement on these significant issues and important ideas are closely accentuated and critically discussed by well-established specialists, philosophers and historians, from various relevant disciplines of study.
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  33. added 2014-03-28
    The Dynamics of Masters Literature: Early Chinese Thought From Confucius to Han Feizi.Wiebke Denecke - 2010 - Harvard University Press.
    Introduction: Chinese philosophy and the translation of disciplines -- The faces of masters literature until the Eastern Han -- Scenes of instruction and master bodies in the Analects -- From scenes of instruction to scenes of construction: Mozi -- Interiority, human nature, and exegesis in Mencius -- Authorship, human nature, and persuasion in Xunzi -- The race for precedence: polemics and the vacuum of traditions in Laozi -- Zhuangzi and the art of negation -- The self-regulating state, paranoia, and rhetoric (...)
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  34. added 2014-03-27
    Introduction to Classical Chinese Philosophy.Bryan W. Van Norden - 2011 - Hackett.
    ■ ■ 1 the historical context I am not of their age or time and so have not personally heard their voices or seen their faces, but I know this by what is ...
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  35. added 2014-03-27
    Conceptions of Intelligence in Ancient Chinese Philosophy.Shih-Ying Yang & Robert J. Sternberg - 1997 - Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 17 (2):101-119.
    Ancient Chinese philosophical conceptions of intelligence differ markedly from those in the ancient Western tradition, and also from contemporary Western conceptions. Understanding these ancient Chinese conceptions of intelligence may help us better understand how a very important culture—Chinese culture—influences people's thinking and behavior, and may also help us broaden, deepen, as well as re-examine our own conceptions of intelligence. This article reviews two ancient Chinese conceptions of intelligence–the Confucian and Taoist– and discusses their ramifications for current thinking about intelligence and (...)
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  36. added 2014-03-26
    Knowledge and Error in Early Chinese Thought.Chris Fraser - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):127-148.
    Drawing primarily on the Mòzǐ and Xúnzǐ, the article proposes an account of how knowledge and error are understood in classical Chinese epistemology and applies it to explain the absence of a skeptical argument from illusion in early Chinese thought. Arguments from illusion are associated with a representational conception of mind and knowledge, which allows the possibility of a comprehensive or persistent gap between appearance and reality. By contrast, early Chinese thinkers understand mind and knowledge primarily in terms of competence (...)
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  37. added 2014-03-25
    Chapter 1: General Surveys, Collections, and Bibliographies.Helmolt Vittinghoff - 2001 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 28 (1&2):1–36.
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  38. added 2014-03-25
    Chapter 8: Other Early Philosophical Schools and Early Philosophers.Helmolt Vittinghoff - 2001 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 28 (1&2):173–188.
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  39. added 2014-03-24
    Readings in Classical Chinese Philosophy.Franklin Perkins - 2002 - Teaching Philosophy 25 (3):269-272.
  40. added 2014-03-24
    Rethinking the Whiteheadian God and Chan/Zen Buddhism in the Tradition of the Yi Jing.Linyu Gu - 2002 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 29 (1):81–92.
  41. added 2014-03-21
    Flowers and Steps in the Boolean Lattice of Hexagrams.Andreas Schöter - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (4):113-128.
  42. added 2014-03-21
    Timing and Rulership in Master Lü's Spring and Autumn Annals (Lüshi Chunqiu).By James D. Sellmann & Jay Goulding - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (2):305–309.
  43. added 2014-03-21
    The Ambivalence of Creation: Debates Concerning Innovation and Artifice in Early China.Edward Slingerland - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (1):131–134.
  44. added 2014-03-21
    The Animal and the Daemon in Early China.By Roel Sterckx & Paul R. Goldin - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (2):309–312.
  45. added 2014-03-21
    Elucidation of Images in the Book of Changes: Ancient Insights Into Modern Language Philosophy and Hermeneutics.Ming Dong Gu - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (4):469-488.
  46. added 2014-03-21
    Flowers and Steps in the Boolean Lattice of Hexagrams.Andreas Schoter - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (4):489-504.
  47. added 2014-03-21
    Guodian Bamboo Texts and Pre-Qin Intellectual Thoughts (Guo Dian Zhu Jian Yu Xian Qin Xue Shu Si Xiang)A.By Guo Yi & Martin Lu - 2004 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 31 (2):297–301.
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  48. added 2014-03-20
    Conceptions of Self/No‐Self and Modes of Connection Comparative Soteriological Structures in Classical Chinese Thought.Mark A. Berkson - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):293-331.
    This essay examines the ways that the terms "self and "no-self can illuminate the views of classical Chinese thinkers, particularly Confucians such as Confucius, Mencius, and Xunzi, and the Daoist thinker Zhuangzi. In particular, the use of the term "no-self" to describe Zhuangzi's position is defended. The concepts of self and no-self are analyzed in relation to other terms within the thinkers' "concept clusters" - specifically temporality, nature, and social roles - and suggestions are given for constructing typologies that sort (...)
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  49. added 2014-03-20
    Oneness and Particularity in Chinese Natural Cosmology: The Notion Tianrenheyi.Ralph Weber - 2005 - Asian Philosophy 15 (2):191 – 205.
    The sensibilities suggested by the notion tianrenheyi have pervaded the Chinese philosophical narrative since, at the earliest, the Spring and Autumn Period, triggering ever novel and enriching interpretations. This paper, far from searching for some ostensible essence of the notion, engages tianrenheyi philosophically from a contemporary perspective. Investigating, inter alia, the kind of unity stipulated by the notion, its moral and spiritual entailments, as well as its relation to transcendence clears the way - now freed from some metaphysical barriers - (...)
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  50. added 2014-03-18
    A Review of Chung-Ying Cheng's "on Five Senses of Yi (Change/Creativity) and the Onto-Cosmological World of Yi". [REVIEW]Andreas Schoter - 2006 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (2):279-285.
1 — 50 / 208