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  1. New Products and Applications of Bamboo. Paper Presented During the National Symposium on the Sustainability of the Bamboo Industry Held at the ERDB Auditorium, College.E. D. Bello & Z. B. Espiloy - forthcoming - Laguna.
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  2. Chinese Landscape Aesthetics: The Exchange and Nurturing of Emotions.Claudia Westermann - 2020 - In Jutta Kehrer (ed.), New Horizons: Eight Perspectives on Chinese Landscape Architecture Today. Basel, Switzerland: pp. 34-37.
    "[..] flowing with the waters, halting with the mountains. In the images of light and wind the ephemeral is inscribed. Time is part of space. The scene performs." -/- The essay "Chinese Landscape Aesthetics: the exchange and nurturing of emotions" by Claudia Westermann included in "New Horizons: Eight Perspectives on Chinese Landscape Architecture Today" introduces ideas of landscape in traditional Chinese thought. Following the etymology of the Chinese terms for landscape and recognizing that their conceptual focus is on the exchange (...)
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  3. Classical Chinese for Everyone: A Guide for Absolute Beginners.Bryan W. Van Norden - 2019 - Indianapolis, IN, USA: Hackett Publishing Company.
    In just thirteen brief, accessible chapters, this engaging little book takes "absolute beginners" from the most basic questions about the language to reading and understanding selections from classical Chinese philosophical texts and Tang dynasty poetry._ " An outstanding introduction to reading classical Chinese_. Van Norden does a wonderful job of clearly explaining the basics of classical Chinese, and he carefully takes the reader through beautifully chosen examples from the textual tradition. An invaluable work." —Michael Puett, Harvard University.
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  4. Philosophers of the Warring States: A Sourcebook in Chinese Philosophy.Steve Coutinho & Kurtis Hagen (eds.) - 2018 - Peterborough, Canada: Broadview Press.
    An anthology of new translations of essential readings from the classical texts of early Chinese philosophy. It includes the Analects of Confucius, Meng Zi (Mencius), Xun Zi, Mo Zi, Lao Zi (Dao De Jing), Zhuang Zi, and Han Fei Zi, as well as short chapters on the Da Xue and the Zhong Yong. Pedagogically organized, it offers philosophically sophisticated annotations and commentaries as well as an extensive glossary explaining key philosophical concepts in detail.
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  5. The Philosophical Thought of Wang Chong.Alexus McLeod - 2018 - Palgrave Macmillan.
    This book is a study of the methodological, metaphysical, and epistemological work of the Eastern Han Dynasty period scholar Wang Chong. It presents Wang’s philosophical thought as a unique and syncretic culmination of a number of ideas developed in earlier Han and Warring States philosophy. Wang’s philosophical methodology and his theories of truth, knowledge, and will and determinism offer solutions to a number of problems in the early Chinese tradition. His views also have much to offer contemporary philosophy, suggesting new (...)
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  6. Chinese Perspectives on Free Will.Christian Helmut Wenzel & Marchal Kai - 2017 - In Kevin Timpe, Meghan Griffith & Neil Levy (eds.), Routledge Companion to Free Will. Routledge. pp. 374-388.
    The problem of free will as it is know in Western philosophical traditions is hardly known in China. Considering how central the problem is in the West, this is a remarkable fact. We try to explain this, and we offer insights into discussions within Chinese traditions that we think are related, not historically but regarding the issues discussed. Thus we introduce four central Chinese concepts, namely: (1) xīn 心 (heart, heart-mind), (2) xìng 性 (human nature, characteristic tendencies, inborn capacity), (3) (...)
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  7. Seeing the Dao: Conceptual Metaphors and the Philosophy of Religion.Victoria S. Harrison - 2015 - Religious Studies 51 (3):307-322.
    This paper suggests that different philosophical traditions have developed and matured around particular conceptual metaphors. It proposes that conceptual metaphor theory provides a useful tool with which to think about different world philosophical traditions, as it can reveal the deep structure of networks of ideas. Conceptual metaphors are not just linguistic devices; rather they organize whole networks of thought, experience, and activity. This idea is explored and special attention paid to the role of those conceptual metaphors that structure ways of (...)
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  8. Collective Wisdom and Civilization: Revitalizing Ancient Wisdom Traditions.Thomas Kiefer - 2015 - Comparative Civilizations Review 72.
    I argue that, in one sense, collective wisdom can save civilization. But in a more important sense, collective wisdom should be understood as a form of civilization, as the result and expression of a moral civilizing-process that comes about through the creation and transmission of collective interpretations of human experience and human nature. Collective wisdom traditions function in this manner by providing an interpretation of what it means to be human and what thoughts, skills, and actions are required to live (...)
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  9. Laughing in Chinese. [REVIEW]Robert Keith Shaw & Guo-Hai Chen - 2014 - Humor 27 (1):167-170.
    Santangelo, Paulo (ed.). 2012.Laughing in Chinese.Rome: Aracne Editrice. 472pp. €26. ISBN 97888 548 46203. This book of 15 papers is divided into four parts: humor in Chinese and Japanese literary works, examples of comic literature, the moral involvement of humor, and the psychology of humor. Santangelo provides a substantial introduction to smiles and laughter in the Chinese context and also to the papers in his book (pp. 5–28). This structure lends itself to a description and analysis of smiling and laughing (...)
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  10. Mortality in Traditional Chinese Thought, Amy Olberding and Philip J. Ivanhoe. [REVIEW]Mathew A. Foust - 2013 - Mortality 18 (3):321-322.
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  11. Zhongtaology: A Confucian Way of Philosophical Thinking and Moral Life.Keqian Xu - 2013 - In School of Philosophy (ed.), XXIII World Congress of Philosophy: Philosophy as Inquiry and Way of Life(Abstract). University of Athens.
    Due to the differences of languages, “ontology” in its original Western sense had not been conceptualized in ancient China. The most prominent and unique feature of Confucian philosophy in early ancient China is “Zhongtaology” instead of “ontology”. Zhongtaology is the philosophical inquiring for the way of “Zhong”, which is based on all the primordially related semantic meanings embodied in the Chinese character “zhong”. Zhongtaological philosophy indicates an association between human beings and their world, a coincidence between subjectivity and objectivity, a (...)
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  12. Zhong 中 and Ideal Rulership in the Baoxun 保訓 (Instructions for Preservation) Text of the Tsinghua Collection of Bamboo Slip Manuscripts.Shirley Chan - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):129-145.
    Zhong 中 is an important notion in early Chinese thought. This essay offers a brief survey of the possible connotations of zhong found in the Baoxun 保訓 text of the Tsinghua University’s Collection of bamboo manuscripts of the Warring States period. By making a preliminary textual analysis and philosophical interpretation of the concept of zhong in relation to ideal rulership as presented in this newly discovered ancient text it is hoped that it will shed some light on the continuing debate (...)
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  13. Friendship and Filial Piety: Relational Ethics in Aristotle and Early Confucianism.Tim Connolly - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (1):71-88.
    This article examines the origins of and philosophical justifications for Aristotelian friendship and early Confucian filial piety. What underlying assumptions about bonds between friends and family members do the philosophies share or uniquely possess? Is the Aristotelian emphasis on relationships between equals incompatible with the Confucian regard for filiality? As I argue, the Aristotelian and early Confucian accounts, while different in focus, share many of the same tensions in the attempt to balance hierarchical and familial associations with those between friends (...)
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  14. The Art of War Corpus and Chinese Just War Ethics Past and Present.Ping-Cheung Lo - 2012 - Journal of Religious Ethics 40 (3):404-446.
    The idea of “just war” is not alien to Chinese thought. The term “yi zhan” (usually translated as “just war” or “righteous war” in English) is used in Mencius, was renewed by Mao Zedong, and is still being used in China today (zhengyi zhanzheng). The best place to start exploring this Chinese idea is in the enormous Art of War corpus in premodern China, of which the Seven Military Classics is the best representative. This set of treatises served as the (...)
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  15. Individualism in Early China: Human Agency and the Self in Thought and Politics by Erica Fox Brindley. [REVIEW]Hagop Sarkissian - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (3):408-410.
    Review of Individualism in Early China: Human Agency and the Self in Thought and Politics by Erica Fox Brindley.
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  16. Shizi: China’s First Syncretist. Shizi - 2012 - Columbia University Press.
    By blending multiple strands of thought into one ideology, Chinese Syncretists of the pre-imperial period created an essential guide to contemporary ideas about self, society, and government. Merging traditions such as Ruism, Mohism, Daoism, Legalism, and Yin-Yang naturalism into their work, Syncretists created an integrated intellectual approach that contrasts with other, more specific philosophies. Presenting the first full English translation of the earliest example of a Syncretist text, this volume introduces Western scholars to both the brilliance of the syncretic method (...)
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  17. Guodian: The Newly Discovered Seeds of Chinese Religious and Political Philosophy (Review).Kirill O. Thompson - 2012 - Philosophy East and West 62 (2):311-316.
  18. 中国古代先哲的时空观研究 Study of Time-Space for Ancient Chinese Philosophers.辉 熊 - 2012 - Advances in Philosophy 1 (2):5-8.
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  19. Interpretations of Virtue (de) in Early China.Alan K. L. Chan - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):134-150.
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  20. Chinese Philosophy in Excavated Early Texts.Chung-Ying Cheng & Franklin Perkins - 2011 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    T he nine papers of this Supplement on these significant issues and important ideas are closely accentuated and critically discussed by well-established specialists, philosophers and historians, from various relevant disciplines of study.
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  21. Knowledge and Error in Early Chinese Thought.Chris Fraser - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):127-148.
    Drawing primarily on the Mòzǐ and Xúnzǐ, the article proposes an account of how knowledge and error are understood in classical Chinese epistemology and applies it to explain the absence of a skeptical argument from illusion in early Chinese thought. Arguments from illusion are associated with a representational conception of mind and knowledge, which allows the possibility of a comprehensive or persistent gap between appearance and reality. By contrast, early Chinese thinkers understand mind and knowledge primarily in terms of competence (...)
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  22. Self as Container? Metaphors We Lose By in Understanding Early China.Jane Geaney - 2011 - Antiquorum Philosophia 5:11-30.
    As part of a trend in modern cognitive science, cognitive linguist, George Lakoff, and philosopher, Mark Johnson claim to provide a biologically-based account of subsymbolic meaningful experiences. They argue that human beings understand objects by extrapolating from their sensory motor activities and primary perceptions. Lakoff and Johnson’s writings have generated a good deal of interest among scholars of Early China because they maintain that “our common embodiment allows for common stable truths.” Although there are many grounds on which Lakoff and (...)
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  23. Abstract Concept Formation in Archaic Chinese Script Forms: Some Humboldtian Perspectives.Kwan 關子尹 Tze-Wan - 2011 - Philosophy East and West 61 (3):409-452.
    Starting from the Humboldtian characterization of Chinese writing as a "script of thoughts," this article makes an attempt to show that notwithstanding the important role played by phonetic elements, the Chinese script also relies on visual-graphical means in its constitution of meaning. In point of structure, Chinese characters are made up predominantly of components that are sensible or even tangible in nature. Out of these sensible components, not only physical objects or empirical states of affairs can be expressed, but also (...)
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  24. Van Norden, Bryan, Introduction to Classical Chinese Philosophy: Indianapolis: Hackett Publishing, 2011, Xvii+271 Pages.Alexus McLeod - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (4):567-570.
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  25. Benti, Practice and State: On the Doctrine of Mind in the Four Chapters of Guanzi. [REVIEW]Peng Peng - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (4):549-564.
    “ Xin 心 (Mind)” is one of the key concepts in the four chapters of Guanzi . Together with Dao, qi 气 (air, or gas) and de 德 (virtue), the four concepts constitute a complete system of the learning of mind which is composed of the theory of benti 本体 (root and body), the theory of practice and the theory of spiritual state. Guanzi differentiates the two basic layers of mind—the essence and the function. It tries to attain a state (...)
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  26. Rosemont, Jr., Henry, and Roger T. Ames, The Chinese Classic of Family Reverence: A Philosophical Translation of the Xiaojing: Honolulu: University of Hawai’I Press, 2009, Xv + 132 Pages. [REVIEW]Thomas Radice - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (2):259-262.
    Rosemont, Jr., Henry, and Roger T. Ames, The Chinese Classic of Family Reverence: A Philosophical Translation of the Xiaojing Content Type Journal Article Pages 259-262 DOI 10.1007/s11712-011-9215-4 Authors Thomas Radice, Department of History, Southern Connecticut State University, New Haven, CT 06515, USA Journal Dao Online ISSN 1569-7274 Print ISSN 1540-3009 Journal Volume Volume 10 Journal Issue Volume 10, Number 2.
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  27. Individualism in Early China: Human Agency and the Self in Thought and Politics – By Erica Fox Brindley.Jeffrey L. Richey - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):495-498.
  28. The Warring States Concept of Xing.Dan Robins - 2011 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 10 (1):31-51.
    This essay defends a novel interpretation of the term xìng 性 as it occurs in Chinese texts of the late Warring States period (roughly 320–221 BCE). The term played an important role both in the famous controversy over the goodness or badness of people’s xìng and elsewhere in the intellectual discourse of the period. Extending especially the work of A.C. Graham, the essay stresses the importance for understanding xìng of early Chinese assumptions about spontaneity, continuity, health, and (in the human (...)
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  29. The Yijing: Metaphysics and Physics.Andreas Schöter - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (3):412-426.
  30. Introduction to Classical Chinese Philosophy.Bryan W. Van Norden - 2011 - Hackett.
    ■ ■ 1 the historical context I am not of their age or time and so have not personally heard their voices or seen their faces, but I know this by what is ...
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  31. Semantic Criticism: The “Westernization” of the Concepts in Ancient Chinese Philosophy—A Discussion of Yan Fu's Theory of Qi.Zhenyu Zeng - 2011 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 6 (1):100-113.
    Every philosophical mode has a unique conceptual system. Qi has consistently been a fundamental part of ancient Chinese philosophy, and its significance is obvious. Guided by the idea of re-evaluating all values, Yan Fu, who was deeply influenced by Western philosophy and logic, used reverse analogical interpretation to present a new explanation of the traditional Chinese concept of qi. Qi thus evolved into basic physical particles. Yan’s philosophical effort has great significance: The logical ambiguity that had haunted qi was overcome. (...)
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  32. Abdication and Utopian Vision in the Bamboo Slip Manuscript, Rongchengshi.Sarah Allan - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):67-84.
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  33. The Guodian Bamboo Slips and Confucian Theories of Human Nature.Lai Chen - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):33-50.
  34. On Internal Onto-Genesis of Virtuous Actions in the Wu Xing Pian.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):142-158.
  35. Introduction: Chinese Philosophy in Excavated Early Texts.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):1-5.
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  36. Philosophy of the Yi: Unity and Dialectics.Zhongying Cheng & On Cho Ng (eds.) - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This volume, an assemblage of essays previously published in the Journal of Chinese Philosophy, conveniently and strategically brings together some of the trenchant interpretations and analyses of the salient, structural aspects of the philosophy of the Yijing. They reveal how the ancient Classic offers a graphically vivid and conceptually dynamic dramaturgy of the ways in which the natural world works in conjunction with the human one. Its cosmological architectonics and philosophical worldview continue to have enormous purchase on our current imagination, (...)
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  37. Chinese Philosophy in Excavated Early Texts.Zhongying Cheng & Franklin Perkins (eds.) - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    T he nine papers of this Supplement on these significant issues and important ideas are closely accentuated and critically discussed by well-established specialists, philosophers and historians, from various relevant disciplines of study.
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  38. “San de” and Warring States Views on Heavenly Retribution.Scott Cook - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):101-123.
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  39. The Dynamics of Masters Literature: Early Chinese Thought From Confucius to Han Feizi.Wiebke Denecke - 2010 - Harvard University Press.
    Introduction: Chinese philosophy and the translation of disciplines -- The faces of masters literature until the Eastern Han -- Scenes of instruction and master bodies in the Analects -- From scenes of instruction to scenes of construction: Mozi -- Interiority, human nature, and exegesis in Mencius -- Authorship, human nature, and persuasion in Xunzi -- The race for precedence: polemics and the vacuum of traditions in Laozi -- Zhuangzi and the art of negation -- The self-regulating state, paranoia, and rhetoric (...)
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  40. Grounding "Language" in the Senses: What the Eyes and Ears Reveal About Ming 名 (Names) in Early Chinese Texts.Jane Geaney - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (2):pp. 251-293.
    For understanding early Chinese "theories of language" and views about the relation of speech to a nonalphabetic script, a thorough analysis of early Chinese metalinguistic terminology is necessary. This article analyzes the function of ming & (name) in early Chinese texts as a first step in that direction. It argues against the regular treatment of this term in early Chinese texts as the equivalent of "word." It examines ming in light of early Chinese ideas about sense perception, the mythology about (...)
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  41. The Tsinghua Bamboo Strips and Ancient Chinese Civilization.Xueqin Li & Guozhong Liu - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):6-15.
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  42. Shaughnessy, Edward L., Rewriting Early Chinese Texts: Albany: SUNY Press, 2006, 287 Pages.Jennifer Lundin Ritchie - 2010 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 9 (1):129-132.
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  43. Review of Virtue Ethics and Consequentialism in Early Chinese Philosophy, by Bryan W. Van Norden. [REVIEW]Alexus McLeod - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (4):554-557.
  44. Introduction: Universalism in Ancient China and Rome.Achim Mittag & Fritz-Heiner Mutschler - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (4):522-526.
  45. Recontextualizing Xing: Self-Cultivation and Human Nature in the Guodian Texts.Franklin Perkins - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):16-32.
  46. Theodicies of Discontinuity: Domesticating Energies and Dispositions in Early China.Michael Puett - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):51-66.
  47. Divination and Autonomy:New Perspectives From Excavated Texts.Lisa Raphals - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):124-141.
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  48. The Chinese Classic of Family Reverence: A Philosophical Translation of the Xiaojing– by Henry Rosemont, Jr. And Roger T. Ames.Jeffrey L. Richey - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (1):144-147.
  49. Proposition, Definition and Inference in Ancient Chinese Philosophy.Ningzhong Shi - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (3):414-431.
    This article attempts to explore ancient Chinese philosophical thought by analyzing how pioneering Chinese thinkers made judgments and inferences, and compares it to ancient Greek philosophy. It first addresses the starting-point and the object of cognition in Chinese ancient philosophy, then analyses how early thinkers construed definition and proposition, and finally discusses how they made inferences on the basis of definition and proposition. It points out that categorization is an important methodology in ancient Chinese philosophy, and that rectification of names (...)
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  50. The Flexibility of Gua and Yao —Based on an Interpretation of Yizhuan.Bo Wang - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (1):68-93.
    In Yizhuan ’s interpretation of The Book of Changes , the book’s fundamental concepts, xiang 象 (images) and ci 辞 (words), play different roles. Concepts, including yin and yang, firmness and gentleness, sancai 三才 (three fundamentals), and the wuxing 五行 (five active elements), are used to interpret The Book of Changes through the interpretation of images, while the core Confucian values, such as benevolence and righteousness, are used to interpret The Book of Changes because of their connection with words of (...)
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