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207 found
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  1. Abdication and Utopian Vision in the Bamboo Slip Manuscript, Rongchengshi.Sarah Allan - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):67-84.
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  2. Philosophical Sense and Classical Chinese Thought.Wayne Alt - 1996 - Asian Philosophy 6 (2):155 – 160.
    A Daoist Theory of Chinese Thought Chad Hansen, 1992 New York; Oxford University Press xvi + 448 pp., hb $65.00.
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  3. Coextending Arising, Te, and Will to Power: Two Doctrines of Self-Transformation.Roger T. Ames - 1984 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 11 (2):113-138.
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  4. Classics in Chinese Philosophy.Wade Baskin - 1972 - Totowa, N.J., Littlefield, Adams.
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  5. New Products and Applications of Bamboo. Paper Presented During the National Symposium on the Sustainability of the Bamboo Industry Held at the ERDB Auditorium, College.E. D. Bello & Z. B. Espiloy - forthcoming - Laguna.
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  6. Conceptions of Self/No‐Self and Modes of Connection Comparative Soteriological Structures in Classical Chinese Thought.Mark A. Berkson - 2005 - Journal of Religious Ethics 33 (2):293-331.
    This essay examines the ways that the terms "self and "no-self can illuminate the views of classical Chinese thinkers, particularly Confucians such as Confucius, Mencius, and Xunzi, and the Daoist thinker Zhuangzi. In particular, the use of the term "no-self" to describe Zhuangzi's position is defended. The concepts of self and no-self are analyzed in relation to other terms within the thinkers' "concept clusters" - specifically temporality, nature, and social roles - and suggestions are given for constructing typologies that sort (...)
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  7. Knowledge Heard and Seen: The Attempt in Early Chinese Philosophy to Analyze Experteential Knowledge.Anne D. Birdwmistell - 1984 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 11 (1):67-82.
  8. The Emergence of Concepts of a Sentence in Ancient Greek and in Ancient Chinese Philosophy1.Richard Bosley - 1997 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 24 (2):209-229.
  9. Music and “Seeking One's Heart-Mind” in the “Xing Zi Ming Chu”.Erica F. Brindley - 2006 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 5 (2):247-255.
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  10. Inner Truth and the Origin of the Yarrow Stalk Oracle.Chappell Brown - 1982 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 9 (2):197-210.
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  11. The Tetrahedron as an Archetype for the Concept of Change in the I Ching.Chappell Brown - 1982 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 9 (2):159-168.
  12. "Seeing" Like a Sage: Three Takes on Identity and Perception in Early China.Miranda Brown & Uffe Bergeton - 2008 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (4):641-662.
  13. Review of Geaney's On the Epistemology of the Senses in Early Chinese Thought. [REVIEW]Brian Bruya - 2003 - China Review International 10 (1):157-164.
    This is a full length review in which I discuss the strengths and weaknesses of Jane Geaney's On the Epistemology of the Senses in Early Chinese Thought. Geaney's strengths lie in her refusal to import Western epistemological presuppositions into depictions of Early Chinese philosophy, her meticulous canvassing of key Warring States texts, and her insightful reconstruction of Early Chinese epistemology as based on perception rather than abstract concepts. Her weaknesses are the limited range of her representative texts and her occasional (...)
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  14. Qing (情) and Emotion in Early Chinese Thought.Brian Bruya - 2001 - Ming Qing Yanjiu 2001:151-176.
    In a 1967 article, A. C. Graham made the claim that 情 qing should never be translated as "emotions" in rendering early Chinese texts into English. Over time, sophisticated translators and interpreters have taken this advice to heart, and qing has come to be interpreted as "the facts" or "what is genuine in one." In these English terms all sense of interrelationality is gone, leaving us with a wooden, objective stasis. But we also know, again partly through the work of (...)
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  15. Original Ontological Roots of Ancient Chinese Philosophy.Marina Čarnogurská - 1998 - Asian Philosophy 8 (3):203-213.
    Abstract This is a new attempt at an analysis of classical Chinese (Confucian) ethics which is still inappropriately explained by Western philosophy as a traditional normative ethical system. Special conditions of ancient Chinese anthropogeny and social and economic development gave rise in this cultural region to an original theory of being, which in modern terminology can be referred to as an ontological model of a fundamental Yin?Yang dialectic of a bipolar and non?homogeneous synergy of being. This theory of being became (...)
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  16. Interpretations of Virtue (de) in Early China.Alan K. L. Chan - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (1):134-150.
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  17. Zhong 中 and Ideal Rulership in the Baoxun 保訓 (Instructions for Preservation) Text of the Tsinghua Collection of Bamboo Slip Manuscripts.Shirley Chan - 2012 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 11 (2):129-145.
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  18. Human Nature and Moral Cultivation in the Guodian 郭店 Text of the Xing Zi Ming Chu 性自命出 (Nature Derives From Mandate).Shirley Chan - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (4):361-382.
    The debate over whether human nature is good or bad and how this is related to self-cultivation was central in the minds of traditional Chinese thinkers. This essay analyzes the interrelationship between the key concepts of xing 性 (human nature), qing 情 (human emotions/feelings), and xin 心 (heart-mind) in the Guodian text of the Xing Zi Ming Chu 性自命出 (Nature Derives from Mandate) discovered in 1993 in Hubei province. The intellectual engagements evident in this Guodian text emerge as more syncretic (...)
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  19. Di 帝 and Tian 天 in Ancient Chinese Thought: A Critical Analysis of Hegel's Views.Derong Chen - 2009 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 8 (1):13-27.
    The notions of Di (Emperor), Shangdi (God in heaven), and Tian (Heaven) were endowed with a variety of meanings and were used to refer to different objects of worship in ancient Chinese religion. In different eras, Di referred to the earthly emperor as well as to the heavenly emperor; Tian referred to the physical sky as well as to a supreme personal god in different contexts. Hegel oversimplified these three notions when he characterized ancient Chinese religion as a kind of (...)
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  20. Cognition, Language, Symbol, and Meaning Making: A Comparative Study of the Epistemic Stances of Whitehead and the Book of Changes.Kuan-Hung Chen - 2009 - Asian Philosophy 19 (3):285-300.
    The epistemic stances of both Whitehead and the Book of Changes are founded on the assumption that process is reality; there are important resonances with respect to perception, meaning and significance. Such a process-oriented approach is productive for developing non-representational and non-dualistic theories in the fields of epistemology, philosophy of language and philosophy of mind. An exploration of these resonances will further provide an appropriate foundation for dialogue between the philosophy of the Book of Changes and that of contemporary Euro-American (...)
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  21. The Guodian Bamboo Slips and Confucian Theories of Human Nature.Lai Chen - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):33-50.
  22. On Harmony as Transformation: Paradigms From the I Ching.Chung Ying Cheng - 1989 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 16 (2):125-158.
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  23. On Internal Onto-Genesis of Virtuous Actions in the Wu Xing Pian.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):142-158.
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  24. Introduction: Chinese Philosophy in Excavated Early Texts.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):1-5.
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  25. Paradigm of Change (Yi ) in Classical Chinese Philosophy: Part I.Chung-ying Cheng - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (4):516-530.
  26. Li and Qi in the Yijing: A Reconsideration of Being and Nonbeing in Chinese Philosophy.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (s1):73-100.
  27. On Harmony as Transformation: Paradigms From the Yijing ".Chung-ying Cheng - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (s1):11-36.
  28. On Harmony as Transformation: Paradigms From the Yijing.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (s1):11-36.
  29. The Yijing as Creative Inception of Chinese Philosophy.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2008 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (2):201–218.
  30. Tthe Yi-Jing Philosophy.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2008 - In Bo Mou (ed.), Routledge History of Chinese Philosophy. Routledge.
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  31. On Human Consciousness in Classical Chinese Philosophy: Developing Onto-Hermeneutics of the Human Person.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2007 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 34 (s1):9-32.
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  32. Inquiring Into the Primary Model: Yi Jing and the Onto-Hermeneutical Tradition.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2003 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (3-4):289-312.
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  33. Classical Chinese Philosophy in a Global Context.Chung-Ying Cheng - 2001 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 2001:13-23.
    I discuss several areas of classical Chinese philosophy such as Confucianism, Daoism, Yijing philosophy, and the Mingjia, in terms of their global relevance for humankind today. I contend that despite the critique of 4 May 1919 and Great Cultural Revolution of 1965–1976, these philosophical schools have remained latent in the consciousness of the Chinese people. I argue that classical Chinese philosophy is very relevant for the present worldwide rebirth (renaissance) of human civilization. It is, in fact, crucial to the development (...)
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  34. Li and Chi in the I Ching: A Reconsideration of Being and Non-Being in Chinese Philosophy.Chung-Ying Cheng - 1987 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 14 (1):1-38.
  35. Confucius, Heidegger, and the Philosophy of the I Ching: A Comparative Inquiry Into the Truth of Human Being.Chung-ying Cheng - 1987 - Philosophy East and West 37 (1):51-70.
  36. On Yi as a Universal Principle of Specific Application in Confucian Morality.Chung-ying Cheng - 1972 - Philosophy East and West 22 (3):269-280.
  37. Chinese Philosophy in Excavated Early Texts.Chung-Ying Cheng & Franklin Perkins - 2011 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    T he nine papers of this Supplement on these significant issues and important ideas are closely accentuated and critically discussed by well-established specialists, philosophers and historians, from various relevant disciplines of study.
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  38. Interpretations of Yang in the Yijing Commentarial Traditions.Dennis Chi-Hsiung Cheng - 2008 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 35 (2):219–234.
  39. Philosophy of the Yi: Unity and Dialectics.Zhongying Cheng & On Cho Ng (eds.) - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    This volume, an assemblage of essays previously published in the Journal of Chinese Philosophy, conveniently and strategically brings together some of the trenchant interpretations and analyses of the salient, structural aspects of the philosophy of the Yijing. They reveal how the ancient Classic offers a graphically vivid and conceptually dynamic dramaturgy of the ways in which the natural world works in conjunction with the human one. Its cosmological architectonics and philosophical worldview continue to have enormous purchase on our current imagination, (...)
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  40. Chinese Philosophy in Excavated Early Texts.Zhongying Cheng & Franklin Perkins (eds.) - 2010 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    T he nine papers of this Supplement on these significant issues and important ideas are closely accentuated and critically discussed by well-established specialists, philosophers and historians, from various relevant disciplines of study.
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  41. A Critique of Leftist Chang Tai-Nien's So-Called "Some Characteristics of Classical Chinese Philosophy".Hsiao Chieh-Fu, Chu Po-Kung, T'ang I.-Chieh & Lu Yü-San - 1971 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 2 (4):196-245.
    As early as January of 1957, at the Peking University Symposium on the Problems of the History of Chinese Philosophy, Chang Tai-nien was already attacking with his glittering words.
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  42. Language and Logic in Ancient China: Collected Papers on the Chinese Language and Logic.Janusz Chmielewski - 2009 - Pan.
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  43. On Standards of Analogic Reasoning in the Late Chou.John S. Cikoski - 1975 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 2 (3):325-357.
  44. Probability Theory Applied to the I Ching.A. G. Clarke - 1987 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 14 (1):65-72.
  45. Humorous Anecdotes in Chinese Historical Texts.Alvin Cohen - 1976 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 96 (1):121-124.
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  46. Yang Xiong.Andrew Colvin - 2005 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  47. Friendship and Filial Piety: Relational Ethics in Aristotle and Early Confucianism.Tim Connolly - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (1):71-88.
    This article examines the origins of and philosophical justifications for Aristotelian friendship (philia) and early Confucian filial piety (xiao). What underlying assumptions about bonds between friends and family members do the philosophies share or uniquely possess? Is the Aristotelian emphasis on relationships between equals incompatible with the Confucian regard for filiality? As I argue, the Aristotelian and early Confucian accounts, while different in focus, share many of the same tensions in the attempt to balance hierarchical and familial associations with those (...)
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  48. “San de” and Warring States Views on Heavenly Retribution.Scott Cook - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (s1):101-123.
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  49. The Dynamics of Masters Literature: Early Chinese Thought From Confucius to Han Feizi.Wiebke Denecke - 2010 - Harvard University Press.
    Introduction: Chinese philosophy and the translation of disciplines -- The faces of masters literature until the Eastern Han -- Scenes of instruction and master bodies in the Analects -- From scenes of instruction to scenes of construction: Mozi -- Interiority, human nature, and exegesis in Mencius -- Authorship, human nature, and persuasion in Xunzi -- The race for precedence: polemics and the vacuum of traditions in Laozi -- Zhuangzi and the art of negation -- The self-regulating state, paranoia, and rhetoric (...)
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  50. Imaging the Imageless: Symbol and Perception in Early Chinese Thought.Franklin M. Doeringer - 1993 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 20 (1):5-27.
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