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  1. Peter Ackermann (2013). The Price of Ritual. Paragrana 22 (1).
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  2. Siqi Ai (1950). Zhe Xue Xuan Ji.
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  3. William Keli’I. Akina (2012). Roger T. Ames's Confucian Role Ethics: A Model of Treating the Text on Its Own Terms. Frontiers of Philosophy in China 7 (4):600-603.
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  4. F. O. X. Alan (2005). Process Ecology and the "Ideal"Dao. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 32 (1):47–57.
  5. W. Albright (1918). The Babylonian Sage Ut-Napištim Rûqu. Journal of the American Oriental Society 38:60-65.
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  6. Anthony Alexander, Different Paths, Same Mountain: Daoism, Ecology and the New Paradigm of Science.
    Western physics in the 18th century was fundamental in establishing basic concepts in the study of economics. However, this form of physics has now been comprehensively displaced by progress within Western science, notably the rise of the new paradigm of science formalised as systems theory. This utilises new mathematical techniques incorporating Newtonian science within a far larger field of understanding that also includes the complex, unpredicateble and fluid aspects of the real world. However, the institutions of the modern world, especially (...)
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  7. Barry Allen (2015). Confucians. In Vanishing Into Things: Knowledge in Chinese Tradition. Harvard University Press. pp. 12-65.
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  8. Barry Allen (2015). War as a Problem of Knowledge: Theory of Knowledge in China’s Military Philosophy. Philosophy East and West 65 (1):1-17.
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  9. Robert Elliott Allinson (2016). Zhuangzi and Buber in Dialogue: A Lesson in Practicing Integrative Philosophy. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (4):547-562.
    I put forward the case that comparative philosophy is best practiced as integrative philosophy. The model for integrative philosophy employed embodies its own methodology, integrating the Hegelian dialectic and the Yin-Yang 陰陽, cyclical model of change illustrated by the Yijing 易經 as strategies for integrating philosophical traditions. As an object lesson, I integrate a real, historical one-way encounter with an imagined two-way encounter between Martin Buber and Zhuangzi 莊子, to provide a counter-example to replace Huntington’s clash of civilizations with a (...)
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  10. Robert Elliott Allinson (2015). Of Fish, Butterflies and Birds: Relativism and Nonrelative Valuation in the Zhuangzi. Asian Philosophy 25 (3):238-252.
    I argue that the main theme of the Zhuangzi is that of spiritual transformation. If there is no such theme in the Zhuangzi, it becomes an obscure text with relativistic viewpoints contradicting statements and stories designed to lead the reader to a state of spiritual transformation. I propose to reveal the coherence of the deep structure of the text by clearly dividing relativistic statements designed to break down fixed viewpoints from statements, anecdotes, paradoxes and metaphors designed to lead the reader (...)
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  11. Robert Elliott Allinson (2007). Wittgenstein, Lao Tzu and Chuang Tzu: The Art of Circumlocution. Asian Philosophy 17 (1):97 – 108.
    Where Western philosophy ends, with the limits of language, marks the beginning of Eastern philosophy. The Tao de jing of Laozi begins with the limitations of language and then proceeds from that as a starting point. On the other hand, the limitation of language marks the end of Wittgenstein's cogitations. In contrast to Wittgenstein, who thought that one should remain silent about that which cannot be put into words, the message of the Zhuangzi is that one can speak about that (...)
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  12. Wayne Alt (2015). The Moral Fool: A Case for Amorality by Hans-Georg Moeller. Philosophy East and West 65 (1):331-341.
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  13. Roger T. Ames (2016). On How to Construct a Confucian Democracy for Modern Times. Philosophy East and West 67 (1):61-81.
    In his new book, Confucian Perfectionism: A Political Philosophy for Modern Times, Joseph Chan observes that Confucianism from its inception has suffered from a gap between its lofty aspirations and its historical reality—that is, there has been a severe discrepancy between its strong and resilient regulative ideals and a persistent pattern of traditionally weak social and governmental institutions and their practices. To overcome this historical disparity, Chan argues that contemporary Confucians should draw upon Western liberal institutions to the extent that (...)
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  14. Roger T. Ames (2002). David L. Hall (1937-2001). Philosophy East and West 52 (3):277-280.
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  15. Roger T. Ames (2002). Remembering David Hall: David L. Hall (1937-2001). Philosophy East and West 52 (3):277-280.
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  16. Roger T. Ames (1992). Editor's Note on A. C. Graham Special Feature. Philosophy East and West 42 (1).
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  17. Roger T. Ames (1984). On The Contingency of Confucius' Emergent Tao. NTU Philosophical Review 7:117-140.
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  18. Roger T. Ames (1984). The Meaning of Body in Classical Chinese Thought. International Philosophical Quarterly 24 (1):39-54.
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  19. Weifu An (2012). Ke Xue Zhe Xue Xin Jin Zhan: Cong Zheng Shi Dao Jian Gou = Kexue Zhexue Xinjinzhan: Cong Zhengshi Dao Jiangou. Shanghai Ren Min Chu Ban She.
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  20. Poul Andersen (2004). Title Index to Daoist Collections (Review). Philosophy East and West 54 (3):407-411.
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  21. Douglas R. Anderson (1992). Bryan W. Van Norden. Journal of Philosophy 89 (4).
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  22. Tyson Anderson (1991). Comment on Huston Smith's Review of "the Essential Writings of Frithjof Schuon". Philosophy East and West 41 (3):365-368.
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  23. I. -Chieh T. Ang (1991). Ju Tao Shih Yü Nei Tsai Ch Ao Yüeh Wen T I.
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  24. Stephen C. Angle (2016). Confucian Justification of Limited Government: Comments on Joseph Chan's Confucian Perfectionism. Philosophy East and West 67 (1):15-24.
    I approach this encounter with Joseph Chan’s important work on Confucian perfectionism from a fundamentally sympathetic standpoint. Most basically, I agree with two of his key premises. Confucianism is more than a rich historical tradition: it is a live strand of political theory, able to criticize and contribute to our lives today. But for modern Confucianism to be plausible and attractive, it must find a way to embrace the idea of limited government or constitutionalism in a deeper fashion than it (...)
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  25. Stephen C. Angle (2005). Ritual and Reverence in Ancient China and Today. [REVIEW] Philosophy East and West 55 (3):471-479.
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  26. Yoav Ariel (1989). Chapter 6. The Various Doctrines and the Teachings1 of the Sage. In K'ung-Ts'ung-Tzu: The K'ung Family Masters' Anthology. Princeton University Press. pp. 102-106.
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  27. Yoav Ariel (1989). Chapter 9. The Minister Kung-I. In K'ung-Ts'ung-Tzu: The K'ung Family Masters' Anthology. Princeton University Press. pp. 116-119.
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  28. Yoav Ariel (1989). Chapter 11. The Philosopher Kung-Sun Lung. In K'ung-Ts'ung-Tzu: The K'ung Family Masters' Anthology. Princeton University Press. pp. 130-134.
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  29. William Arnold (1905). Solomon's Horse-Trade. Journal of the American Oriental Society 26:104.
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  30. Chris Arthur (1994). Becoming Bamboo. Philosophy Now 11:41-43.
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  31. Geoff Ashton & Sonja Tanner (2016). From Puzzling Pleasures to Moral Practices: Aristotle and Abhinavagupta on the Aesthetics and Ethics of Tragedy. Philosophy East and West 66 (1):13-39.
    For well over a thousand years, countless audiences have taken pleasure in watching unfold the following fearful event:Filled with dread, desperately tossing unchewed grass from its mouth, looking back at the hunting king, a beautiful deer springs into flight to escape a fast-approaching chariot from which repeated arrows fly — one of which will inevitably lodge in the deer’s defenseless body. This is not a scene from “National Geographic” or an episode from some sadly popular TV hunting show. Indeed, this (...)
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  32. Friederike Assandri (2012). Zhuangzi: The Essential Writings with Selections From Traditional Commentaries – By Brook Ziporyn. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 39 (1):157-160.
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  33. Friederike Assandri (2009). Beyond the Daode Jing: Twofold Mystery in Tang Daoism. Three Pines Press.
    Introduction -- Historical background : schools and politics -- Major representatives : Daoists of the Liang and Tang -- The sources : commentaries and scriptures -- Key concepts : mystery, Dao, and the greater cosmos -- Salvation : Dao-nature and the sage -- The teaching : mysticism, cultivation, and integration -- Changes in the Pantheon : Laozi and the heavenly deities -- The body of the sage : the three-in-one and the three- -- Fold body of the Buddha.
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  34. Mark L. Asselin & John Makeham (1997). Name and Actuality in Early Chinese Thought. Journal of the American Oriental Society 117 (2):392.
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  35. Iep Author (2016). Daoist Philosophy.
    Daoist Philosophy Along with Confucianism, “Daoism” is one of the two great indigenous philosophical traditions of China. As an English term, Daoism corresponds to both Daojia, an early Han dynasty term which describes so-called “philosophical” texts and thinkers such as Laozi and … Continue reading Daoist Philosophy →.
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  36. Iep Author (2016). Laozi.
    Laozi Laozi is the name of a legendary Daoist philosopher, the alternate title of the early Chinese text better known in the West as the Daodejing, and the moniker of a deity in the pantheon of organized “religious Daoism” that arose during the later Han dynasty. Laozi is … Continue reading Laozi →.
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  37. Youngsun Back (2015). Fate and the Good Life: Zhu Xi and Jeong Yagyong’s Discourse on Ming. Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 14 (2):255-274.
    This essay examines the Ru 儒 notion of ming 命, usually translated into English as “fate,” with an emphasis on the thought of two prominent Ru thinkers, Zhu Xi 朱熹 of Song 宋 China and Jeong Yagyong 丁若鏞 of Joseon 朝鮮 Korea. Although they were faithful followers of the tradition of Kongzi 孔子and Mengzi 孟子, they held very different views on ming. Zhu Xi saw the realm of fate as determined by contingent movements of psychophysical force, whereas Jeong Yagyong believed (...)
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  38. Tongdong Bai (2009). How to Rule Without Taking Unnatural Actions (无为而治): A Comparative Study of the Political Philosophy of the Laozi. Philosophy East and West 59 (4):pp. 481-502.
    In this essay, the understanding of naturalness and of ruling without taking unnatural actions in the "Laozi" will be clarified and elaborated on, and it will be argued that the "Laozi" offers a theoretically adequate and realistic proposal to address both the problems of its times and some of the problems of modernity.
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  39. Yao Baimao (1984). On the Position of the Category of Transformation in Dialectics. Contemporary Chinese Thought 16 (1):62-77.
    What position does the category of transformation hold in materialist dialectics? Arguments prevalent in the past ascribed it to the identity of contradiction, viewing it as an implication of identity. Comrades Rong Kaiming and Lai Chuanxiang published in the fourth issue of Philosophic Studies of 1983 an article entitled "Transformation Is a Relatively Independent Overall Category," which offers a different view. The article holds that the process of transformation itself is not an implication of the identity of contradiction but that (...)
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  40. Wu Baoping & Lin Cunguang (2016). Reflections on the Concept of “Law” of Shang Yang From the Perspective of Political Philosophy: Function, Value, and Spirit of the “Rule of Law”. Contemporary Chinese Thought 47 (2):125-137.
    EDITOR’S ABSTRACTThis article argues that Shang Yang’s philosophy of law was not only a means to enrich the state and strengthen its army, but also envisioned the orderly rule of all All-under-Heaven. Through a fair, universal, and reliable use of rewards, punishments, and also teaching, this vision of laws could ultimately lead to the promotion of moral values, popular consensus, and people’s self-governance. While the authors admit that in Shang Yang’s own historical context, law was no more than a tool (...)
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  41. Jack Barbalet (2014). Greater Self, Lesser Self: Dimensions of Self‐Interest in Chinese Filial Piety. Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 44 (2):186-205.
    While self-interest is depreciated in Confucian ethics the processes of family relations in traditional China are animated by the self-interested actions of family members. The paper outlines the Confucian ideology of filial piety which is commensurate with the governance of family life organized hierarchically and through the senior male's management of the joint-family's collective property. The structure, operations and principles of membership in traditional Chinese families are indicated, highlighting the tensions within them between consanguinity and conjugality and their material bases. (...)
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  42. Timothy Hugh Barrett (1991). Li Ao Buddhist, Taoist, or Neo-Confucian?
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  43. Cary F. Baynes & Irene Eber (eds.) (1995). Understanding the "I Ching": The Wilhelm Lectures on the Book of Changes. Princeton University Press.
    The West's foremost translator of the I Ching, Richard Wilhelm thought deeply about how contemporary readers could benefit from this ancient work and its perennially valid insights into change and chance. For him and for his son, Hellmut Wilhelm, the Book of Changes represented not just a mysterious book of oracles or a notable source of the Taoist and Confucian philosophies. In their hands, it emerges, as it did for C. G. Jung, as a vital key to humanity's age-old collective (...)
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  44. John Beaudoin (2001). Another Beating for a Resilient Horse. Philo 4 (1):90-96.
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  45. Tania Becker (2009). Supple Like a Newborn Child, Strong Like a Lumberjack and Composed Like a Wise Man. Application of Classical Daoism Philosophy in Taiji Principles. Synthesis Philosophica 24 (1):167-179.
    Taiji – sport, meditation, martial art , health preservation, way of enlightenment and philosophy of life – is one the best-known signs for recognizing Chinese Daoism. The following article wishes to explain the influence of classical philosophical Taoism notions such as dao , qi and wuwei and their application on Taiji principles practiced today world wide. Arising from tradition of an early Daoism those notions are the core of its fundamental books and forming material of Daoistic philosophy, which has managed, (...)
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  46. Tania Becker (2009). Savitljiv poput novorođenčeta, snažan poput drvosječe i staložen poput mudraca. Primjena filozofije klasičnog daoizma u principima Taijia. Synthesis Philosophica 24 (1):167-179.
    Taiji − šport, meditacija, borbena vještina , očuvanje zdravlja, put prosvjetljenja i filozofija života − jedan je od najpoznatijih znakova raspoznavanja kineskog daoizma. Predstojeći članak želi osvijetliti utjecaj pojmova klasičnog filozofskog daoizma, kao što su dao , qi i wuwei , te njihovu primjenu u principima Taijia kakav se prakticira danas u cijelome svijetu. Izrasli iz tradicije ranog daoizma ti su pojmovi srž njegovih osnovnih knjiga , te služe kao građevni elementi daoističke filozofije, koja je, iako tokom tisućljeća izložena velikim (...)
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  47. Wolfgang Behr (2010). Role of Language in Early Chinese Constructions of Ethnic Identity. Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (4):567-587.
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  48. James Behuniak Jr (2009). "Embracing the One" in the Daodejing. Philosophy East and West 59 (3):pp. 364-381.
    "Embracing the One" (baoyi 抱—) and "holding to the One" (zhiyi 孰—) are phrases that appear in different versions of the Daodejing. This essay argues that, in a specific philosophical context, these two phrases represent competing philosophical attitudes that stem from opposing cosmological visions. The recently unearthed "Great One Produces the Waters" (Taiyishengshui ) assists in the reconstruction of this philosophical context, as does a re-reading of the "One" in the famous generative sequence of chapter 42 of the Daodejing. Ultimately, (...)
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  49. Jim Behuniak (2015). Joseph Grange as Teacher. Philosophy East and West 65 (3):677-680.
    There is not much of a substantive nature to add to Robert Neville’s thorough and thoughtful exposition of Grange’s work in systematic cosmology. I wish to pick up briefly, however, on where Neville leaves off, namely on the topic of “soul” and on the “astonishingly transformative” nature of Grange as a teacher. I had the good fortune to have Professor Grange as my very first philosophy teacher, and I feel that further comment on this aspect of his life is necessary (...)
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  50. Yan Beiming (1981). The Reevaluation of Zhuangzi. Contemporary Chinese Thought 12 (4):63-89.
    Zhuangzi is one of the great figures in the history of ancient Chinese thought. While Laozi and Zhuangzi are ranked together as the founders of Daoism, it is in fact primarily Zhuangzi who, as the worthy adversary of the Confucian school of Confucius and Mencius, has been the greatest influence in politics, culture, and thought. While this influence has had its negative aspects, its positive side has predominated. How to dialectically and historically evaluate Zhuangzi properly is a very important problem.
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