Classical Confucianism

Edited by Hagop Sarkissian (CUNY Graduate Center, Baruch College (CUNY))
Assistant editor: Andrew Lambert (College of Staten Island (CUNY))
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  1. Review of Chenyang Li’s The Confucian Philosophy of Harmony.Yingying Tang - 2014 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 8 (25).
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  2. The Suberogation Problem for Lei Zhong's Confucian Virtue Theory of Supererogation.Tsung-Hsing Ho - 2019 - Philosophy East and West 69 (3):779-784.
    A virtue-based theory of right action aims to explain deontic moral principles in terms of virtue and vice. For example, it may maintain the following account of moral obligation: It is morally obligatory for an agent A to ϕ in circumstances C if and only if a fully virtuous and relevantly informed person V would characteristically ϕ in C. However, this account faces the so-called supererogation problem. A supererogatory action is an action that is morally praiseworthy but not morally obligatory. (...)
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  3. A New Ritual of the Orphic Mysteries.Michael Tierney - 1922 - Classical Quarterly 16 (2):77-87.
    In discussing the origin and history of Orphism, it is usual to treat it rather as a system of belief than as a ritual. The former aspect of it probably was more salient in later times, yet it is certain that the Orphic movement began rather as a ritual with strong emphasis on purification and a rule of life. Its theological and traditional aspect developed only gradually, and the greatest characteristic of this development was always its readiness to incorporate elements (...)
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  4. Do Filial Values Corrupt? How Can We Know? Clarifying and Assessing the Recent Confucian Debate.Hagop Sarkissian - forthcoming - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy:1-15.
    In a number of papers, Liu Qingping has critiqued Confucianism’s commitment to ‘consanguineous affection’ or filial values, claiming it to be excessive and indefensible. Many have taken issue with his textual readings and interpretive claims, but these responses do little to undermine the force of his central claim that filial values cause widespread corruption in Chinese society. This is not an interpretive claim but an empirical one. If true, it merits serious consideration. But is it true? How can we know? (...)
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  5. When You Think It's Bad It's Worse Than You Think: Psychological Bias and the Ethics of Negative Character Assessments.Hagop Sarkissian - 2015 - In Brian Bruya (ed.), The Philosophical Challenge from China. Cambridge, MA, USA: pp. 3-21.
    We often find ourselves thinking of others as boring, nauseating, dim, dodgy, clumsy, or otherwise irritating or unpleasant. What’s the right thing to do when we have such thoughts? Some philosophers argue we ought to be civil and conceal them, lest others pick up on them and feel disrespected. Drawing on experimental psychology and classical Confucianism, I argue otherwise, suggesting that we ought to (literally) doubt such appraisals and be wary of their veracity.
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  6. Is Self-Regulation a Burden or a Virtue? A Comparative Perspective.Hagop Sarkissian - 2014 - In Nancy Snow & Franco V. Trivigno (eds.), The Philosophy and Psychology of Character and Happiness: An Empirical Approach to Character and Happiness. New York, NY, USA: pp. 181-196.
    Confucianism demands that individuals comport themselves according to the strictures of ritual propriety—specific forms of speech, clothing, and demeanor attached to a vast array of life circumstances. This requires self-regulation, a cognitive resource of limited supply. When this resource is depleted, a person can experience undesirable consequences such as social isolation and alienation. However, one’s cultural background may be an important mediator of such costs; East Asians, in particular, seem to have comparatively greater self-regulatory strength. I offer some considerations as (...)
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  7. Review: Stephen C. Angle and Michael Slote (Eds.), Virtue Ethics and Confucianism, Routledge, 2013, 271pp., $125.00 (Hbk), ISBN 9780415815482. [REVIEW]Hagop Sarkissian - 2014 - Notre Dame Philosophical Reviews 5:10.
    Review of Stephen C. Angle and Michael Slote (eds.), Virtue Ethics and Confucianism, Routledge, 2013, 271pp., $125.00 (hbk), ISBN 9780415815482.
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  8. 因小得大: 情境论于道德哲学的困难与可能 (Minor Tweaks, Major Payoffs: The Problems and Promise of Situationism in Moral Philosophy).Hagop Sarkissian - 2012 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy and Culture 9.
    This is a translation of "Minor Tweaks, Major Payoffs" (2010) prepared by 黃玉娥 for the Journal of Chinese Philosophy and Culture for a special issue edited by Brian Bruya on cognitive science and early Chinese philosophy.
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  9. 고전 유교에서의 감정: 내면과 외면" ("Emotions in Classical Confucianism: Inside and Out").Hagop Sarkissian - 2012 - In 유교 도교 불교의 감성이론 (Theories of Emotion in Confucianism, Daoism and Buddhism). Seoul:
    Classical Confucian thought is full of discussion of human emotions, reflecting a preoccupation with the inner life-how one ought to feel 'on the inside', as it were. Yet alongside these passages are others that seem, by contrast, to be concerned with matters external to one's emotions and psychology: how one ought to dress, speak, walk, and talk. Yet passages such as these, which draw attention to details of individual expression and comportment, are not at all tangential when it comes to (...)
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  10. Confucianism and Neo-Confucianism.Justin Tiwald - 2018 - In Nancy E. Snow (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Virtue. New York, USA: Oxford University Press. pp. 171-89.
    In this chapter the author defends the view that the major variants of Confucian ethics qualify as virtue ethics in the respects that matter most, which concern the focus, investigative priority, and explanatory priority of virtue over right action. The chapter also provides short summaries of the central Confucian virtues and then explains how different Confucians have understood the relationship between these and what some regard as the chief or most comprehensive virtue, ren (humaneness or benevolence). Finally, it explicates what (...)
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  11. Transmitting and Innovating in Confucius: Analects 7:1.Jiyuan Yu - 2012 - Asian Philosophy 22 (4):375-386.
    Although the saying at Analects 7:1 is well-known and often mentioned in Confucian scholarship, there have been few focused discussions about what ‘transmitting’ means and in what sense it is contrasted to ‘innovating’. This article seeks to argue for the following points. The ‘transmitting/innovating’ relationship should be understood in relation to the Confucian notion of filial piety. Analects 7: 1 is indeed Confucius's self-conception of what he is doing, that is, his way of philosophizing. Traditionally, Confucius's transmitting has been thought (...)
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  12. Transmitting and Innovating in Confucius: Analects 7:1.Jiyuan Yu - 2012 - Asian Philosophy 22 (4):375-386.
    Although the saying at Analects 7:1 is well-known and often mentioned in Confucian scholarship, there have been few focused discussions about what ‘transmitting’ means and in what sense it is contrasted to ‘innovating’. This article seeks to argue for the following points. The ‘transmitting/innovating’ relationship should be understood in relation to the Confucian notion of filial piety. Analects 7: 1 is indeed Confucius's self-conception of what he is doing, that is, his way of philosophizing. Traditionally, Confucius's transmitting has been thought (...)
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  13. An Introduction to Chinese Philosophy (2nd Ed.).Karyn Lai - 2018 - Cambridge University Press.
    This comprehensive introductory textbook to early Chinese philosophy covers a range of philosophical traditions which arose during the Spring and Autumn and Warring States periods in China, including Confucianism, Mohism, Daoism, and Legalism. It considers concepts, themes and argumentative methods of early Chinese philosophy and follows the development of some ideas in subsequent periods, including the introduction of Buddhism into China. The book examines key issues and debates in early Chinese philosophy, cross-influences between its traditions and interpretations by scholars up (...)
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  14. Mencius and Augustine on Evil.Bryan Van Norden - 2001 - In Bo Mou (ed.), Two Roads to Wisdom? La Salle, IL, USA: Open Court. pp. 313-36.
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  15. Situationism, Manipulation, and Objective Self-Awareness.Hagop Sarkissian - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (3):489-503.
    Among those taking the implications of situationism seriously, some have suggested exploiting our tendency to be shaped by our environments toward desirable ends. The key insight here is that if experimental studies produce reliable, probabilistic predictions about the effects of situational variables on behavior—for example, how people react to the presence or absence of various sounds, objects, and their placement—then we should deploy those variables that promote prosocial behavior, while avoiding or limiting those that tend toward antisocial behavior. Put another (...)
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  16. Institutional Structures and Idealism of Character.B. Wong David - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):25-36.
    I find Joseph Chan’s Confucian Perfectionism: A Political Philosophy for Modern Times to be bold and illuminating, and, as always with his work, lucid in an exemplary fashion. I find much more to agree with than to differ with, but in the spirit of a conception of he 和 or harmony that places importance on the need for difference as well as agreement, I will point out some complications or reservations that can be raised about Chan’s proposals and put forward (...)
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  17. David E. Mungello, "Leibniz and Confucianism: The Search of Accord". Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz, "Discourse on the Natural Theology of the Chinese", Trans. Henry Rosemont, Jr. And Daniel J. Cook. [REVIEW]Edward J. Machle - 1980 - Journal of the History of Philosophy 18 (4):476.
  18. The Wisdom of Confucius.Ch'ien Confucius, Yutang Ssu-ma & Lin - 1943 - New York: Illustrated Modern Library.
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  19. Han®Guk Yuhak Yæon®Gu.Myong-Jong Yu - 1988 - Imun Ch°Ulp°Ansa.
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  20. The Wisdom of Confucius.Hongming Confucius, Yutang Gu, Ssu-ma Ch'ien & Lin - 1938 - New York: The Modern Library.
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  21. The Wisdom of Confucius.Yutang Confucius, Ch ien Lin, Hung-Ming Ssu-Ma & Ku - 1938 - New York: Modern Library.
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  22. The Wisdom of Confucius.Yutang Confucius, Ch ien Lin, Hungming- Ssu-ma & Ku - 1938 - New York: Modern Library.
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  23. The Wisdom of Confucius. -.William Confucius & Jennings - 1968 - New York: Philosophical Library; [Distributed by Book Sales.
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  24. The Wisdom of Confucius.Yutang Confucius, Qian Lin, Hongming Sima & Gu - 1938 - New York: H. Hamilton.
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  25. Confucian and Liberal Ethics for Public Policy: Holistic or Atomistic?Andrew Brennan & Julia Tao - 2003 - Journal of Social Philosophy 34 (4):572-589.
  26. An Inquiry Into the Possibility of a Third-Phase Development of Confucianism.Tang Yijie - 1983 - Chinese Studies in Philosophy 15 (2):3.
    Is there the possibility for Confucianism to have a third-phase development? In saying this we mean to regard the school of thought advocated by Confucius, Mencius, and Xunzi during the Spring and Autumn period and the Warring States as the first-phase development of Confucianism. After the Han Dynasty Buddhism spread to China. Under the impact of Buddhist ideas, a Confucian school of idealist philosophy emerged during the Song and Ming dynasties. It greatly pushed forward the Confucian doctrines and constituted the (...)
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  27. Special Topic: Creativity in Christianity and Confucianism: Creativity: A Confucian View.Tu Weiming - 2007 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 6 (2):115-124.
    By focusing on the Confucian ideal of forming one body with Heaven, Earth, and myriad things, I argue that the distinctive feature of Chinese cosmology is not the absence of cosmogonist concerns, but faith in the interconnectedness of all modalities of being as the result of the continuous creativity of the cosmic process.
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  28. The West in Distress - Resurrecting Confucius Teachings for a New Cultural Vision and Synthesis. [REVIEW]Xin Wei - 1998 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 25 (3):381-388.
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  29. Confucian Political Ethics – by Daniel A. Bell: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Sor-Hoon Tan - 2009 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 36 (1):177-180.
  30. From &Ldquowhat is Below&Rdquo to &Ldquowhat is Above&Rdquo: A Confucian Discourse on Wisdom.Xinzhong Yao - 2006 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 33 (3):349-363.
  31. The Mencian Theory of Human Xing Reconsidered1.Zhaolu Lu - 1999 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 26 (2):147-163.
  32. 20th Century Contributions in Chinese Philosophy of Religion: From Deconstructive Contradiction to Constructive Reconsideration.Lauren Pfister - 2003 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 30 (3-4):541-553.
  33. The Significance of the Confucian Texts as “Scripture” in the Confucian Tradition.Youncchan Ro - 1988 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 15 (3):269-287.
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  34. Trying to Do Justice to the Concept of Justice in Confucian Ethics1.Yang Mao - 1997 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 24 (4):521-551.
  35. Review of Under Confucian Eyes: Writings on Gender in Chinese History by Sunsan Mann and Yu-Yin Cheng; and of Women in Daoism by Catherine Despeux and Livia Kohn. [REVIEW]Zhou Yiqun - 2006 - Philosophy East and West 56 (4):684-687.
  36. Review of Boston Confucianism: Portable Tradition in the Late-Modern World by Robert Cummings Neville. [REVIEW]Bryan William van Norden - 2003 - Philosophy East and West 53 (3):413-417.
  37. Jiyuan Yu: Review of The Ethics of Confucius and Aristotle: Mirrors of Virtue, Routledge 2007. [REVIEW]Christian Helmut Wenzel - 2010 - Philosophy East and West 60 (2):303-306.
  38. Review of Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius, by May Sim. [REVIEW]Christine Swanton - 2009 - Philosophy East and West 59 (2):230-233.
  39. A Temporal Analysis of the Consciousness of Filial Piety.Xianglong Zhang & Huang Deyuan - 2007 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 2 (3):309-335.
    The reason for the emergence of consciousness of filial piety is that parental care could activate reciprocal filial piety. Parental care and filial piety are two supplementary phenomena caused by the same time consciousness. Phenomenology neglects consciousness of filial piety because it lacks the thinking that sees the fundamental "meaning of time" in the intersection of "past" and "future". The consciousness of filial piety can only be really constituted by a human being's personal experience. "Frustrations in personal life" and "breeding (...)
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  40. Notes From a Confucian Perspective: Which Human Acts Are Moral Acts?Henry Rosemont Jr - 1976 - International Philosophical Quarterly 16 (1):49-61.
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  41. Republican Constitutional Politics and Family-State Imagination: Zhou Shoujuan and the "Free Talk" Column in Shenbao: 1921-1926.Chen Jianhua - 2012 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 44 (1):36-69.
  42. Confucianism and Civic Virtue.Gordon B. Mower - 2013 - Social Philosophy Today 29:75-87.
    Understanding within the western tradition of civic virtue can be supplemented in important ways by giving attention to the civic tradition as it developed in classical Chinese philosophy. The western tradition of civic virtue originates in the context of the small city-state political dynamics of Athens and Florence. As a result of this developmental context, the traditional civic virtues themselves are geared to the ends associated with small states. Established wisdom before the foundation of the United States suggested that any (...)
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  43. Confucius.Harold Shadick & H. G. Creel - 1951 - Philosophical Review 60 (1):113.
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  44. Mencius.Alvin P. Cohen - 1977 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 97 (3):410.
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  45. Confucius.John Louton & D. Howard Smith - 1975 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 95 (2):276.
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  46. Mencius.Francis C. Gramlich - 1973 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 93 (2):209.
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  47. Confucianism and African Conceptions of Value, Reality and Knowledge (儒家思想与非洲的价值观、现实 观与知识观).Thaddeus Metz - 2016 - International Social Science Journal (Chinese Edition 国际社会科学杂志) 33 (4):159-170.
    This article, translated into Chinese by Tian Kaifang, summarizes and critically reflects on the current state of the literature that has recently begun to put Chinese Confucianism into dialogue with characteristically African conceptions of what is good, what fundamentally exists, and how to obtain knowledge. As most of this literature has addressed value theory, this article focuses largely on it, too. It first illustrates how similar the foundational values are between the two cultural traditions; central to both traditional China and (...)
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  48. Remastering Morals with Aristotle and Confucius.May Sim - 2007 - Cambridge University Press.
    Aristotle and Confucius are pivotal figures in world history; nevertheless, Western and Eastern cultures have in modern times largely abandoned the insights of these masters. Remastering Morals provides a book-length scholarly comparison of the ethics of Aristotle and Confucius. May Sim's comparisons offer fresh interpretations of the central teachings of both men. More than a catalog of similarities and differences, her study brings two great traditions into dialog so that each is able to learn from the other. This is essential (...)
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  49. Confucian Ethics and Labor Rights.Tae Wan Kim - 2014 - Business Ethics Quarterly 24 (4):565-594.
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  50. The Creative Spirit of Confucius as Seen in the Book of Changes.Fang Tung-Mei - 1976 - Contemporary Chinese Thought 7 (3):78-89.
    Today, we shall initiate a discussion of the Book of Changes [variously romanized as I, I-ching and Chou I]. Before discussing this work, however, we must emphasize that in all of our studies of the ancient texts, we must first go back to the real facts contained in them. When we study history, we must go back to the true facts. We must not just add oil and vinegar; we must not impose the ideas of later periods on an earlier (...)
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