About this topic
Summary This category covers issues in classical Confucianism that don't fall under its sibling leaf categories. It includes works that are not only related to Confucius, Mencius and Xunzi considered to be main authors in what we think of as classical Confuciansm and  works that are not covered by two major topics in Confuciansm: The Doctrine of the Mean and The Great Learning. Many works cover early Confucianism from a comparative perspective, like comparisons of Confucian ethics with Kant and also very often Aristotle or more contemporary authors like Rawls. It can be very challenging and interesting to read about Confucian ethics in the age of social media and other applications of the classical concepts to modern society.
Key works Some important Confucian ideas are dealt with in the works in this category. Those are concepts like cheng or sincerity (An 2004) and ming or fate (Slingerland 1996).
Introductions Littlejohn 2010 Yao & Tu 2010 Berthrong & Evelyn Nagai Berthrong 2004
Related categories
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1 found
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  1. Fallibilism in Early Confucian Philosophy.Tim Connolly - manuscript
    Fallibilism is a precondition for the conversation between culturally distinct philosophies that comparative philosophy tries to bring about. Without an acknowledgement that our own tradition’s claims may be incomplete or mistaken, we would have no reason to engage members of other communities. Were the early Confucians fallibilists? While some contemporary commentators have seen fallibilism as an essential characteristic of the Confucian tradition, others have argued that the tradition is characterized instead by an “epistemological optimism,” and must be substantially revised if (...)
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  2. A Behavioural Study on the Influences of Confucianism in Chinese Society.Helal Uddin Ahmed & Zhang Jielin - forthcoming - Philosophy and Progress:109-132.
    Confucius is considered to be a great philosopher and educator in Chinese society and one of the greatest scholars ever in world history. He was the founder of Confucianism, which constitutes a major part of traditional Chinese culture and made tremendous contribution to the unfolding of Chinese civilization over the centuries. In this study, the authors have presented a comprehensive outline of Confucianism and have attempted to gauge the attitude of contemporary Chinese people towards Confucian concepts, values and attributes as (...)
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  3. Tongdong Bai: Against Political Equality: The Confucian Case.Yutang Jin - forthcoming - Res Publica:1-6.
    Tongdong Bai’s ambitious book, Against Political Equality: The Confucian Case, aims to not only draw on classic Confucianism to shed light on contemporary issues but also make Confucianism universally applicable to the human conditions widely shared around the globe. Bai’s Confucian political theory carries distinctive merits in both its innovative approach and comprehensive scope, but there are still ambiguities of which he owes us more explanation. In this review article, I offer a brief summary of Bai’s book and critically engage (...)
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  4. The Narrative of the Junzi as an Exemplar in Classical Confucianism and its Implications for Moral and Character Education.Yen-Yi Lee - forthcoming - Tandf: Educational Philosophy and Theory:1-10.
  5. Confucianism and Ritual.Hagop Sarkissian - forthcoming - In Jennifer L. Oldstone-Moore (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Confucianism. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    Confucian writings on ritual from the classical period (ca 8th-3rd centuries BCE), including instruction manuals, codes of conduct, and treatises on the origins and function of ritual in human life, are impressive in scope and repay careful engagement. These texts maintain that ritual participation fosters social and emotional development, helps persons deal with significant life events such as marriages and deaths, and helps resolve political disagreements. These early sources are of interest not only to historians and Sinologists, but also to (...)
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  6. Skill and Expertise in Three Schools of Classical Chinese Thought.Hagop Sarkissian - forthcoming - In Ellen Fridland & Carlotta Pavese (eds.), Routledge Handbook of Skill and Expertise. Routledge.
    The classical Chinese philosophical tradition (ca. 6th to 3rd centuries BCE) contains rich discussion of skill and expertise. Various texts exalt skilled exemplars (whether historical persons or fictional figures) who guide and inspire those seeking virtuosity within a particular dao (guiding teaching or way of life). These texts share a preoccupation with flourishing, or uncovering and articulating the constituents of an exemplary life. Some core features thought requisite to leading such a life included spontaneity, naturalness, and effortless ease. However, there (...)
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  7. Confucianism and Totalitarianism: An Arendtian Reconsideration of Mencius Vs. Xunzi.Lee Wilson - forthcoming - Philosophy East and West 71 (4).
    Totalitarianism is perhaps unanimously regarded as one of the greatest political evils of the last century and has been the grounds for much of Anglo-American political theory since. Confucianism, meanwhile, has been gaining credibility in the past decades among sympathizers of democratic theory in spite of criticisms of it being anti-democratic or authoritarian. I consider how certain key concepts in the classical Confucian texts of the Mencius and the Xunzi might or might not be appropriated for ‘legitimising’ totalitarian regimes. Under (...)
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  8. Han Feizi’s Genealogical Arguments.Lee Wilson - forthcoming - In Eirik Lang Harris & Henrique Schneider (eds.), Adventures in Chinese Realism: Classic Philosophy Applied to Contemporary Issues. Albany, NY, USA: SUNY Press.
    Han Feizi’s criticisms of Confucian and Mohist political recommendations are often thought to involve materialist or historicist arguments, independently of their epistemological features. Drawing largely on Amia Srinivasan’s recent taxonomy of genealogical arguments, this paper proposes a genealogical reading of passages in “The Five Vermin [五蠹 wudu]” and “Eminence in Learning [顯學 xianxue].” This reveals Han Feizi’s arguments to be more comprehensively appreciated as problematizing Confucian and Mohist political judgments as arising from undermining contingencies, rendering them irrelevant, if not detrimental, (...)
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  9. Against Political Equality: The Confucian Case by Tongdong Bai.Zhuoyao Li - 2021 - Philosophy East and West 71 (1):1-3.
    The rise of populism and the decline of western liberal democracies in the recent decade have pushed many contemporary Confucian political theorists to re-examine the relationship between Confucianism and liberal democracy. On the one hand, whether or not Confucianism and liberal democracy are strictly compatible with each other is no longer important to many. Instead, it is theoretically more interesting and practically more urgent to try and explore the best of both worlds. On the other hand, if the relationship can (...)
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  10. Virtues and the Book of Rites.Ann A. Pang-White - 2021 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 48 (1):56-70.
    This paper explores the meaning of Confucian de 德 in the Book of Rites 《禮記》. Using intertextual discussions with texts supplemented by the Analects《論語》, the Mengzi 《孟子》, and the Xunzi《荀子》, I argue that ritual and virtue are closely interrelated. Without ritual, virtue is raw. Without virtue, ritual is barren. De’s interrelationship with ritual is central to Confucian ethics. Ritual is constitutive for all Confucian virtues. This central thesis coupled with subsequent features such as de’s aesthetic dimension and thick interpersonal relationships (...)
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  11. The Phenomenology of Ritual Resistance: Colin Kaepernick as Confucian Sage.Philip J. Walsh - 2021 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 20 (1):1-24.
    In 2016, Colin Kaepernick, a quarterback for the San Francisco 49ers, remained seated during the national anthem in order to protest racial injustice and police brutality against African-Americans. After consulting with National Football League and military veteran Nate Boyer, Kaepernick switched to taking a knee during the anthem for the remainder of the season. Several NFL players and other professional athletes subsequently adopted this gesture. This article brings together complementary Confucian and phenomenological analyses to elucidate the significance of Kaepernick’s gesture, (...)
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  12. Google and Facebook Vs Rawls and Lao-Tzu: How Silicon Valley’s Utilitarianism and Confucianism Are Bad for Internet Ethics.Morten Bay - 2020 - AoIR 2020: The 21th Annual Conference of the Association of Internet Researchers.
    The proposed paper presents an argument in favor of a Rawlsian approach to ethics for Internet technology companies (den Hoven & Rooksby, 2008; Hoffman, 2017). Ethics statements from such companies are analyzed and shown to be utilitarian and teleological in nature, and therefore in opposition to Rawls’ theories of justice and fairness. The statements are also shown to have traits in common with Confucian virtue ethics (Ames, 2011; Nylan, 2008).
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  13. Archery Metaphor and Ritual in Early Confucian Texts.Rina Marie Camus - 2020 - Lexington Books.
    This book explores the significance of archery as ritual practice and literary metaphor in classical Confucian texts. Archery passages in the Analects, Mencius, and Xunzi are discussed in the light of Zhou culture and the troubled historical circumstances of early followers of the ruist master Confucius.
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  14. Confucianism and Daoism: On the Relationship Between the Analects, Laozi, and Zhuangzi, Part I.Paul J. D'Ambrosio - 2020 - Philosophy Compass 15 (9):1-11.
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  15. Exemplary Paternalism: A Consideration of Confucian Models of Moral Oversight.Sarah Flavel & Brad Hall - 2020 - Culture and Dialogue 8 (2):220-250.
    In this article we examine Classical Confucian political thinking through the lens of paternalism. We situate Confucianism amid contemporary models of paternalism to show that Confucianism can be understood as a soft form of paternalism regarding its method. Confucianism stresses cultivation of the people by moral exemplars to guide the people to act in ways that are in their own best interests. This is in contrast to use of law and punishment as a deterrent of unwanted behaviours of the people. (...)
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  16. How Would Confucian Virtue Ethics for Business Differ From Aristotelian Virtue Ethics?Daryl Koehn - 2020 - Journal of Business Ethics 165 (2):205-219.
    Confucianism is potentially relevant to business ethics and business practice in many ways. Although some scholars have seen Confucian thought as applicable to corporate social responsibility :433–451, 2009) and to corporate governance :30–43, 2013), only a few business ethicists :415–431, 2001b; Journal of Business Ethics 116:703–715, 2013; Romar in Journal of Business Ethics 38:119–131, 2002; Lam in The Analects, Penguin Classics, London, 2003; Chan in Journal of Business Ethics 77:347–360, 2008; Woods and Lamond in Journal of Business Ethics 102:669–683, 2011) (...)
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  17. Love’s Extension: Confucian Familial Love and the Challenge of Impartiality.Andrew Lambert - 2020 - In Michael Kühler Rachel Fedock (ed.), Love, Justice, and Autonomy: Philosophical Perspectives. New York, NY, USA: pp. 364pp.
    The question of possible moral conflict between commitment to family and to impartiality is particularly relevant to traditional Confucian thought, given the importance of familial bonds in that tradition. Classical Confucian ethics also appears to lack any developed theoretical commitment to impartiality as a regulative ideal and a standpoint for ethical judgment, or to universal equality. The Confucian prioritizing of family has prompted criticism of Confucian ethics, and doubts about its continuing relevance in China and beyond. This chapter assesses how (...)
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  18. Creativity East and West.Yuanyuan Liu - 2020 - Dissertation, University of Edinburgh
    This thesis is about the creativity in the East and the West, but I will mainly focus on the view of creativity in ancient Greek philosophy and Chinese philosophy. In the first chapter, I will explore the concept of creativity, the history of creativity, and the research on creativity, including the creativity research in psychology and philosophy, which will set the stage for further disscusion. Then in the second chapter, I will start from Plato’s dialogue, Ion, and explore the traditional (...)
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  19. Confucianism, Commerce, Capitalism.Henrique Schneider - 2020 - Culture and Dialogue 8 (2):295-322.
    This paper discusses commerce in Early Confucianism. It argues that the virtuous Confucian agent engages with the world in different ways, including in commerce – it is another way of acting with virtue. This conception is compared with two roughly contemporary approaches in economics, the thought of Wilhelm Röpke and the Humanomics project by Vernon Smith. In both, virtue is constitutive to commerce. However, they differ substantially in the exact relationship between virtue and commerce. While in Early Confucianism commerce is (...)
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  20. Why Confucianism Matters in Ethics of Technology.Pak-Hang Wong - 2020 - In Shannon Vallor (ed.), Oxford Handbook of Philosophy of Technology. Oxford University Press.
    There are a number of recent attempts to introduce Confucian values to the ethical analysis of technology. These works, however, have not attended sufficiently to one central aspect of Confucianism, namely Ritual (‘Li’). Li is central to Confucian ethics, and it has been suggested that the emphasis on Li in Confucian ethics is what distinguishes it from other ethical traditions. Any discussion of Confucian ethics for technology, therefore, remains incomplete without accounting for Li. This chapter aims to elaborate on the (...)
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  21. Relating the Political to the Ethical: Thoughts on Early Confucian Political Theory.Eirik Harris - 2019 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 18 (2):277-283.
    This essay examines the role that the the ethical plays in early Confucian political philosophy. By focusing primarily on the political thought of Xunzi, I argue that there is a necessary relationship between ethical ideas and political ideas in texts such as the Analects, Mengzi, and Xunzi. In particular, I argue against a more ‘realist’ reading of the tradition which argues that for early Confucians political order was not only a goal independent of ethical goals but also one in which (...)
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  22. Confucianism Before Confucius: The Yijing and the Rectification of Names.Halla Kim - 2019 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 46 (3-4):161-181.
    A substantial reason behind the Confucian canonization of the Yijing can be located in some underlying patterns of thinking common to both the Yijing and The Analects; especially relevant here is the doctrine of rectification of names. In particular, I analyze the fundamental structure of the Yijing by means of the names and symbols standing in unique semantic/semiotic relations to the world, and I go on to suggest that this is what is importantly entailed by the doctrine of the rectification (...)
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  23. Emotional Attachment and Its Limits: Mengzi, Gaozi and the Guodian Discussions.Karyn L. Lai - 2019 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 14 (1):132-151.
    Mengzi maintained that both benevolence (ren 仁) and rightness (yi 義) are naturally-given in human nature. This view has occupied a dominant place in Confucian intellectual history. In Mencius 6A, Mengzi's interlocutor, Gaozi, contests this view, arguing that rightness is determined by (doing what is fitting, in line with) external circumstances. I discuss here some passages from the excavated Guodian texts, which lend weight to Gaozi's view. The texts reveal nuanced considerations of relational proximity and its limits, setting up requirements (...)
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  24. Ethics, Politics, and the Recognition of Agency in Early Confucianism: A Commentary on Loubna El Amine’s Classical Confucian Political Thought: A New Interpretation.Ellie Wang - 2019 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 18 (2):259-268.
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  25. Virtue and the Good Life in the Early Confucian Tradition.Youngsun Back - 2018 - Journal of Religious Ethics 46 (1):37-62.
    This essay examines the role of virtue and the status of non-moral goods in conceptions of the good human life through an exploration of the thought of Confucius and Mencius. Both Confucius and Mencius lived in quite similar worlds, but their conceptualizations of the world differed from each another. This difference led them to hold different views on the role of virtue and the status of non-moral goods. On the one hand, Confucius highlighted the self-sufficiency of virtue, but he acknowledged (...)
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  26. Between Benevolence and Righteousness.Shaoming Chen - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 9:101-113.
    The notion of benevolence-righteousness un-doubtedly constitutes the core of Mencius’s theory concerning the goodness of human nature, it also holds the key to the entire Confucian ethics. Despite the fact that we normally give Confucius credit for his discussion over the concept of benevolence, it is Mencius who creates the conjoint of benevolence-righteousness.But as a category benevolence-righteous-ness does not represent a sheer combination of benevolence and righteousness, but suggests a new or reformative version of this line of thought in the (...)
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  27. Partial Values: A Comparative Study in the Limits of Objectivity.Kevin DeLapp - 2018 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    An examination of the tensions between different conceptions of objectivity and subjectivity, and impartiality and partiality, as they arise in epistemology, ethical theory, and metaethics. Resources from classical Chinese philosophy are leveraged throughout the work to showcase new alternative ways of resolving these tensions.
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  28. How is Justice Understood in Classic Confucianism?Christophe Duvert - 2018 - Asian Philosophy 28 (4):295-315.
    ABSTRACTIn Sinicized Asia, justice, conceptualized and institutionalized in its current form on a Western mold is part of a singular and ancient Confucian legal tradition.In this paper, it will be argued that Confucians initially articulated the concept of justice in relation to their own explanation of the world and their ideal, which distinguishes and rewards men’s actions according to their merits and social condition.It will be shown that Confucius’s thinking is primarily political and suggests ways of harmoniously organizing and reforming (...)
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  29. An Ethics of Interdependence in the Doctrine of the Mean.Manuel B. Dy - 2018 - Eco-Ethica 7:25-34.
    This paper attempts to derive an ethics of interdependence in the Chung Yung, the Doctrine of the Mean. The Doctrine of the Mean, one of the Four Books of Confucianism often paired with the Great Learning, Ta Hsueh, is considered a patchwork of at least two separate writings. While the title indicates the topic to be the Doctrine of the Mean, analogous to the Aristotelian Mean, the latter half of the treatise discusses another topic, Cheng, translated often as sincerity, truth, (...)
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  30. The Idea of Immortal Life After Death in Biblical Judaism and Confucianism.Xiaowei Fu & Yi Wang - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 18:7-16.
    There is no notion of postmortem Heaven and Hell in both ancient Israeli and Confucian traditions, and the two traditions also share quite a number of similarities about the idea of immortal life after death. Therefore, a comparison of the commonness in this field, e.g. the Jewish Levirate Marriage custom and the Confucian custom of adopting one’s son as heir; the idea of name surviving death in Biblical Judaism and that of glorifying one’s parents by making one’s name famous in (...)
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  31. Confucianism, Curiosity, and Moral Self-Cultivation.Ian James Kidd - 2018 - In Ilhan Inan, Lani Watson, Safiye Yigit & Dennis Whitcomb (eds.), The Moral Psychology of Curiosity. New York: Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 97-116.
    I propose that Confucianism incorporates a latent commitment to the closely related epistemic virtues of curiosity and inquisitiveness. Confucian praise of certain people, practices, and dispositions is only fully intelligible if these are seen as exercises and expressions of epistemic virtues, of which curiosity and inquisitiveness are the obvious candidates. My strategy is to take two core components of Confucian ethical and educational practice and argue that each presupposes a specific virtue. To have and to express a ‘love of learning’ (...)
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  32. On the Kingcraft Spirit of Confucianism.Jinglin Li - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 9:121-134.
    The Confucian theory of kingcraft represented a spirit of “moral supremacy”. Confucius and Mencius distinguished “kingcraft” from “rule by force”, which not only emphasized their essential difference at the level of value, but also paid great attention to their relevancy and overlapping of the meaning of existence at the level of being beneficial to society and achievements. The Confucian put emphasis on “justice and humanity” as the highest principle in ethical community, instead of “profit”. Only with morality and justice as (...)
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  33. Confucianism, Perfectionism, and Liberal Society.Franz Mang - 2018 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 17 (1):29-49.
    Confucian scholars should satisfy two conditions insofar as they think their theories enable Confucianism to make contributions to liberal politics and social policy. The liberal accommodation condition stipulates that the theory in question should accommodate as many reasonable conceptions of the good and religious doctrines as possible while the intelligibility condition stipulates that the theory must have a recognizable Confucian character. By and large, Joseph Chan’s Confucian perfectionism is able to satisfy the above two conditions. However, contrary to Chan and (...)
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  34. Confucian Relational Hermeneutics, the Emotions, and Ethical Life.Eric S. Nelson - 2018 - In Paul Fairfield & Saulius Geniusas (eds.), Relational Hermeneutics: Essays in Comparative Philosophy. London: Bloomsbury. pp. 193-204.
    In paradigmatic Confucian (Ruist) discourses, emotion (qing) has been depicted as co-arising with human nature (xing) and an irreducible constitutive source of human practices and their interpretation. The affects are concurrently naturally arising and alterable through how individuals react and respond to them and how they are or are not cultivated. That is, emotions are relationally mediated realities given in and transformed through how they are felt, understood, interpreted, and acted upon. Confucian discourses have elucidated the ethical character of the (...)
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  35. Daxue : The Great Learning for Universities Today.Vincent Shen - 2018 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 17 (1):13-27.
    The so-called daxue zhi dao 大學之道, though a Confucian way of self-cultivation, can inspire contemporary universities through a process of creative interpretation. Having examined the ethos of modern university in its four historical stages, I come up with its last stage of reaching out in the era of globalization and dialogue among civilizations, in which we have to rethink the idea of university from the fuller development of human reason. This can be achieved only through increasingly reaching out toward many (...)
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  36. Confucius on the Relation Between Beauty/Yue and Goodness/Li.Yi Wang & Xiaowei Fu - 2018 - Proceedings of the XXIII World Congress of Philosophy 9:81-87.
    Yuejiao was the primary form of education ever since the time of Emperors Yao and Shun. This tradition of valuing Yue over Li lasted till the Three Dynasties period. After the Spring and Autumn Period, Lijiao became the dominant form, but it still consisted of a lot of yue. Seeing the declining of this tradition, Confucius claimed to “follow upon Zhou”. That is, he wanted to recover and inherit this ideology that engages primarily in music cultivation supplemented by ritual normalization. (...)
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  37. Confucianism, Food, and Sustainability.Jan Erik Christensen - 2017 - Asian Philosophy 27 (1):16-29.
    This paper addresses the issue of ecological sustainability and the dilemma between instrumental rationality and protection of the environment through a discussion of food production. In Confucianism, all human activities, including consumption of food, are seen as inseparable from problems of value. While Confucianism stresses the importance of healthy food, it rejects viewing nature as only having instrumental value. The Confucian view of sustainability can be seen from three parts: Humans should follow the murmuring of their 'heart/mind' and seek to (...)
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  38. Confucian Propriety and Ritual Learning: A Philosophical Interpretation by Geir Sigurðsson.Paul J. D'Ambrosio - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (2):571-575.
    In his most recent book, Against Individualism: A Confucian Rethinking of the Foundations of Morality, Politics, Family, and Religion, Henry Rosemont defends against those who would call his reading of Confucianism—he sees it as a type of Role Ethics—a misinterpretation. Rosemont contends that Confucian Role Ethics is important for challenging individualism, even if it is somehow unfaithful to pre-Qin texts. He writes that he could "simply re-title" his book "Role Ethics: A Different Approach to Moral Philosophy Based on a Creative (...)
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  39. Confucianism and American Philosophy.Mathew A. Foust - 2017 - Albany, USA: SUNY Press.
    In this highly original work, Mathew A. Foust breaks new ground in comparative studies through his exploration of the connections between Confucianism and the American Transcendentalist and Pragmatist movements. In his examination of a broad range of philosophers, including Confucius, Mencius, Xunzi, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, Charles Peirce, William James, and Josiah Royce, Foust traces direct lines of influence from early translations of Confucian texts and brings to light conceptual affinities that have been previously overlooked. Combining resources from (...)
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  40. Core Conceptions of the Theory of Self-Cultivation in East Asian Confucian Philosophy.Chun-Chieh Huang - 2017 - Philosophy Study 7 (1).
    The present study examines the four core concepts that underpin the various theories of cultivation of East Asian Confucian philosophy: self, cultivation, transformation, and nurture. The discussion is divided into six sections. The first section, the introduction, explains the significance of the issue in question. The second section examines the substantial notion of “self” as expounded in the Confucian intellectual tradition and the corresponding concept of selfhood or personhood. Confucianism stresses that personal selfhood is based on the freedom of subjectivity, (...)
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  41. Whose Tradition? Which Dao? Confucius and Wittgenstein on Moral Learning and Reflection by James F. Peterman.Galia Patt-Shamir - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (1):288-291.
    Whose Tradition? Which Dao? Confucius and Wittgenstein on Moral Learning and Reflection by James F. Peterman addresses the valuable position that Confucius’ dao can and has to be understood within the useful framework of Wittgensteinian forms of life, their concrete language games, and the mastery of techniques and rule- following, and that Wittgenstein’s forms of life embody critical therapeutic interventions that can be better understood through Confucian ideas of moral practice and reflection, most significantly as the practice of ritual. Placing (...)
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  42. Jak „Chiny” stworzyły Europę: narodziny oświeceniowego sekularyzmu z ducha konfucjanizmu.Dawid Rogacz - 2017 - Diametros 54:138-160.
    The aim of the article is to demonstrate that the contact between European philosophy and Chinese culture in the 17 th and 18 th centuries had an influence on the emergence and development of secularism, which became a distinctive feature of the Western Enlightenment. In the first part, I examine in what way knowledge of the history of China and the Confucian ethics contested the Biblical chronology and undermined faith as a prerequisite for morality. Subsequently, I analyze the attempts to (...)
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  43. Relational Self in Classical Confucianism: Lessons From Confucius' Analects.O. Thompson Kirill - 2017 - Philosophy East and West 67 (3):887-907.
    One’s translating, reading, and understanding of texts from other eras and traditions are conditioned by tacit assumptions built into one’s own vocabulary and psycho-cultural understanding of self—of which one tends to be only intuitively aware. Thus, for example, when encountering the vocabulary in Classical Chinese for “I,” “me,” “mine,” “self,” et cetera, modern readers are inclined to import their own linguistic, cognitive, and cultural intuitions about these terms, unconsciously and without second thought. This has been particularly problematic for modern Western (...)
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  44. Chinese Perspectives on Free Will.Christian Helmut Wenzel & Marchal Kai - 2017 - In Kevin Timpe, Meghan Griffith & Neil Levy (eds.), Routledge Companion to Free Will. Routledge. pp. 374-388.
    The problem of free will as it is know in Western philosophical traditions is hardly known in China. Considering how central the problem is in the West, this is a remarkable fact. We try to explain this, and we offer insights into discussions within Chinese traditions that we think are related, not historically but regarding the issues discussed. Thus we introduce four central Chinese concepts, namely: (1) xīn 心 (heart, heart-mind), (2) xìng 性 (human nature, characteristic tendencies, inborn capacity), (3) (...)
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  45. The Excitement of Crossing Boundaries.David B. Wong - 2017 - Journal of World Philosophies 2 (1):149-155.
    This is an intellectual autobiography that aims to explain how I am both an analytic philosopher who writes on questions of moral relativism and pluralism and also on classical Confucianism and Daoism. I have written on the subjects of moral psychology and moral epistemology, articulating what I see to be a fruitful consilience between insights of both Confucian and Daoist thinkers and some of the latest findings in psychology and neuroscience. I regard as synergistic and completely logical this combination of (...)
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  46. Towards Filial Love: Reconsidering Hans Urs von Balthasar's Theme of Christological Obedience in Light of Early Confucian Philosophy.Joshua R. Brown - 2016 - Heythrop Journal 57 (4):n/a-n/a.
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  47. The Boundaries of Manners: Ritual and Etiquette in Early Confucianism and Stohr’s On Manners.Erin M. Cline - 2016 - Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 15 (2):241-255.
    Early Confucian philosophy affirms and lends support to Karen Stohr’s argument that manners are a primary means by which we express moral attitudes and commitments and carry out important moral goals. Indeed, Confucian views on ritual can extend her insights even further, both by highlighting the role that manners play in cultivating good character and by helping us to probe the conceptual boundaries of manners. The various things that we call etiquette, social customs, and rituals do much of the same (...)
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  48. Confucianism, Buddhism, and Virtue Ethics.Bradford Cokelet - 2016 - European Journal for the Philosophy of Religion 8 (1):187-214.
    Are Confucian and Buddhist ethical views closer to Kantian, Consequentialist, or Virtue Ethical ones? And how can such comparisons shed light on the unique aspects of Confucian and Buddhist views? This essay (i) provides a historically grounded framework for distinguishing western views, (ii) identifies a series of questions that we can ask in order to clarify the philosophic accounts of ethical motivation embedded in the Buddhist and Confucian traditions, and (iii) then critiques Lee Ming-huei’s claim that Confucianism is closer to (...)
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  49. Virtues and Roles in Early Confucian Ethics. [REVIEW]Connolly Tim - 2016 - In . pp. 272-284.
    Many passages in early Confucian texts such as the Analects and Mengzi are focused on virtue, recommending qualities like humaneness, righteousness, and trustworthiness. Still others emphasize roles: what it means to be a good son, a good ruler, a good friend, a good teacher, or a good student. How are these teachings about virtues and roles related? In the past decade there has been a growing debate between two interpretations of early Confucian ethics, one that sees virtues as fundamental, and (...)
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  50. Wei‐Jin Period Xuanxue ‘Neo‐Daoism’: Re‐Working the Relationship Between Confucian and Daoist Themes.Paul J. D'Ambrosio - 2016 - Philosophy Compass 11 (11):621-631.
    In recent years, philosophical ideas developed during the Wei-Jin period, broadly referred to as xuanxue in Chinese and ‘Neo-Daoism’ or ‘Dark Learning’ in English, have been accorded increasing attention in academia. This article provides an introduction to some major thinkers of the Wei-Jin period, addressing both their original writings and recent scholarly interpretations. The article aims to demonstrate that many Wei-Jin period intellectuals formed their theories through reinterpreting the relationship between texts associated with Daoism and Confucianism. Thinkers of this period (...)
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