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1 — 50 / 60
  1. added 2020-05-20
    Radiohead and Some Questions About Music.Edward Slowik - 2009 - In George Reisch & B. W. Forbes (eds.), Radiohead and Philosophy. Chicago, IL: Open Court: pp. 41-52.
    This essay examines the music of Radiohead as a means of introducing various elementary concepts and theories in the philosophy of music.
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  2. added 2020-05-17
    Sonic Pictures.Jason Leddington - forthcoming - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism.
    Winning essay of the American Society for Aesthetics' inaugural Peter Kivy Prize. Extends Kivy's notion of sonic picturing through engagement with recent work in philosophy of perception. Argues that sonic pictures are more widespread and more aesthetically and artistically important than even Kivy envisioned. Topics discussed include: the nature of sonic pictures; the nature of sounds; what we can (and more importantly, cannot) conclude from musical listening; sonic pictures in film; beatboxing as an art of sonic picturing; and cover songs (...)
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  3. added 2019-11-02
    Legg-Hutter Universal Intelligence Implies Classical Music is Better Than Pop Music for Intellectual Training.Samuel Alexander - 2019 - The Reasoner 13 (11):71-72.
    In their thought-provoking paper, Legg and Hutter consider a certain abstrac- tion of an intelligent agent, and define a universal intelligence measure, which assigns every such agent a numerical intelligence rating. We will briefly summarize Legg and Hutter’s paper, and then give a tongue-in-cheek argument that if one’s goal is to become more intelligent by cultivating music appreciation, then it is bet- ter to use classical music (such as Bach, Mozart, and Beethoven) than to use more recent pop music. The (...)
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  4. added 2019-10-20
    Group Flow.Tom Cochrane - 2017 - In Micheline Lesaffre, Pieter-Jan Maes & Marc Leman (eds.), The Routledge Companion of Embodied Music Interaction. London, UK: Routledge. pp. 133-140.
    In this chapter I analyse group flow: a state in which performers report intense interpersonal absorption with the music and each other. I compare group flow to individual flow, and argue that the same essential structure can be discerned. I argue that group flow does not justify an anti-representationalist enactivist interpretation. However, I claim that the cognitive task in which the music is produced is irreducibly collective.
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  5. added 2019-10-20
    On the Resistance of the Instrument.Tom Cochrane - 2013 - In Tom Cochrane, Klaus Scherer & Bernardino Fantini (eds.), The Emotional Power of Music: Multidisciplinary perspectives on musical arousal, expression, and social control. Oxford: pp. 75-83.
    I examine the role that the musical instrument plays in shaping a performer's expressive activity and emotional state. I argue that the historical development of the musical instrument has fluctuated between two key values: that of sharing with other musicians, and that of creatively exploring new possibilities. I introduce 'the mood organ'- a sensor-based computer instrument that automatically turns signals of the wearer's emotional state into expressive music.
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  6. added 2019-09-23
    Living the Work: Meditations on a Lark.Jonathan A. Neufeld - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 45 (1):89.
    It is widely assumed that there is a blanket norm requiring the performer to present the work “in the best light possible,” and that the performer “make the ends of the work his own” or “live the work” in performance. Through careful consideration of a particular performance, I suggest that this is an inadequate conception of a performer’s obligations. I argue that the form of identification between performer and work commonly propounded by philosophers, musicologists, music teachers, and performers alike is (...)
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  7. added 2019-01-30
    The Routledge Companion to Philosophy and Music. [REVIEW]António Lopes - 2015 - Disputatio 7 (40):100-112.
    Lopes_The Routledge companion to Philosophy and Music, by Kania and Gracyk.
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  8. added 2018-12-16
    Historically Uninformed Views of Historically Informed Performance.Matteo Ravasio - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 2 (77):193-205.
    This paper argues that contemporary analytic philosophy of music has characterized historically informed performance practice as compliance-focused, impersonal, and work-centered. The first part of the paper gathers evidence in support of this claim from the works of Julian Dodd, Peter Kivy, James O. Young, Aron Edidin, and Stephen Davies. In the second part of the paper, I reject this received view. Evidence from actual performance practice, as well as from the practitioners’ reflection on their activity, belies the received view outlined (...)
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  9. added 2018-04-22
    Music and the Ineffable.Carolyn Abbate (ed.) - 2003
    Vladimir Jankélévitch left behind a remarkable œuvre steeped as much in philosophy as in music. His writings on moral quandaries reflect a lifelong devotion to music and performance, and, as a counterpoint, he wrote on music aesthetics and on modernist composers such as Fauré, Debussy, and Ravel. Music and the Ineffable brings together these two threads, the philosophical and the musical, as an extraordinary quintessence of his thought. Jankélévitch deals with classical issues in the philosophy of music, including metaphysics and (...)
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  10. added 2017-11-16
    O Valor de um Bach Autêntico: um estudo sobre o conceito de autenticidade na execução de obras musicais.António Correia Lopes - 2009 - Dissertation, Universidade de Lisboa
    The concept of authenticity as a predicate of performances of musical works is discussed in the context of the Western classical tradition.I claim that the concept of a performance of a musical work raises issues of relativity and indeterminacy, since its application is not completely free from music-historical contextuality and from considerations of aesthetic value.I challenge the argument for the necessity of authenticity in performance that eschews the problem of determining the extension of the concept authentic performance of a work' (...)
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  11. added 2016-07-02
    Deve a Interpretação Musical Ser Eticamente Condicionada?António Lopes - manuscript
    The paper addresses the issue of ethical obligations in the performance of musical works in the Western classical tradition, arguing that there are indeed such obligations, although they are not categorical. -/- PT: Na tradição clássica ocidental, as obras de arte musicais, teatrais e, até certo ponto, as coreografias, são criadas por artistas-autores, mas necessitam de ser executadas por intérpretes (instrumentistas, cantores e maestros, actores e encenadores, bailarinos, etc.). Estes são assim chamados porque existe sempre uma dose de descricionariedade, não (...)
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  12. added 2016-07-02
    Relativismo na Avaliação de Execuções Musicais.António Lopes - 2006 - Philosophica 27:121-134.
    This is the first of a series of papers in which I present a defense of moderate objectivism about the evaluation of performances of musical works in the Western classical tradition.
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  13. added 2016-07-02
    Musical Works and Performance Evaluation.António Lopes - 2005 - Postgraduate Journal of Aesthetics 2 (2):76-86.
    This paper addresses the following problem: to what extent do ontological considerations about musical works affect our evaluation of performances of those works? I argue for the claim that at least some important grounds on which performances are evaluated are specific to them, in that these grounds are either independent from, or related but not fully determined by, the properties of the works they are of. In the first part of the paper, I explore the relations between good-making features of (...)
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  14. added 2016-02-19
    "Where Nature Will Speak to Them in Sacred Sounds" : Music and Transcendence in E.T.A. Hoffmann.Thomas J. Mulherin - 2015 - In Férdia Stone-Davis (ed.), Music and Transcendence. Ashgate. pp. 159-176.
  15. added 2015-09-11
    Myth, Music, and Science: Teaching the Philosophy of Science Through the Use of Non-Scientific Examples.Edward Slowik - 2003 - Science & Education 12 (3):289-302.
    This essay explores the benefits of utilizing non-scientific examples and analogies in teaching philosophy of science courses. These examples can help resolve two basic difficulties faced by most instructors, especially when teaching lower-level courses: first, they can prompt students to take an active interest in the class material, since the examples will involve aspects of the culture well-known, or at least more interesting, to the students; and second, these familiar, less-threatening examples will lessen the students' collective anxieties and open them (...)
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  16. added 2015-03-18
    Mundrys Nuancen.Andreas Dorschel - 2015 - In Heike Hoffmann (ed.), Salzburg Biennale 2015. Salzburg Biennale. pp. 62-64.
    The production of artworks can be based on a fixed modus operandi, i.e., on a general manner and, alongside, specific patterns to be applied all over again. Alternatively, each artwork can be seen as (cor-)responding to an individual problem for which there is no recipe; in this case it needs to be looked at afresh. That approach characterizes the aesthetics of music composer Isabel Mundry (*1963); her art, ever unpredictable, is one of nuances.
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  17. added 2014-12-22
    Aesthetics of Conducting: Expression and Gesture.Andreas Dorschel - 2013 - In Jean Paul Olive & Susanne Kogler (eds.), Expression et geste musical. L'Harmattan. pp. 65-73.
    Expression in orchestral music is a matter of conductors rather than orchestras. Why should that be so? The straightforward answer seems to be that expression is bound to the individual self. But, then, does it have to be? Collective expression of, e.g., anger, rage or protest is not at all unusual in the public domain of politics. Our intuition of conductors’ expressive primacy could be salvaged if we were to conceive of orchestras as their instruments. But that will not do. (...)
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  18. added 2014-12-22
    Einführung zu den Schriften [Richard Wagners].Andreas Dorschel - 2012 - In Laurenz Lütteken (ed.), Wagner Handbuch. Bärenreiter. pp. 110-117.
    In his writings, Richard Wagner imagines art as something natural. This paradox was only befitting for Wagner’s contradictory historical stance: that of an eminently modern artist loathing the modern world. For him, nature served as a yardstick apt to find the modern world deficient on all counts. But how can something ahistorical, nature, be used to judge a historical phenomenon, modernity? To arrive at the verdict Wagner was keen on, he had to fill his concept of nature with historical content (...)
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  19. added 2014-12-22
    Individualism for the Masses: Aesthetic Paradox in Mahler’s Symphonic Thought.Andreas Dorschel - 2011 - In Elisabeth Kappel (ed.), The Total Work of Art: Mahler’s Eighth Symphony in Context. Universal Edition. pp. 46-60.
    In his Eighth Symphony Gustav Mahler envisions modern artistic production to steer clear of an alternative emerging at the time: that between popular music on the one hand and esoteric avantgarde music on the other; Mahler’s music is meant to reach the masses, but without descending to audiences’ lowest common denominator. One query through which Mahler’s paradoxical aesthetic vision of an ‘individualism for the masses’ can be explored has been hinted at by the composer himself: Does his integral symphonic work (...)
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  20. added 2014-12-22
    Der ‘Kunstregelbau’. Kontrapunktik in Max Webers Fragment Zur Musiksoziologie.Andreas Dorschel - 2010 - In Ulrich Tadday (ed.), Philosophie des Kontrapunkts. edition text + kritik. pp. 135-142.
    In his social theory, Max Weber (1864 – 1920) attempts to identify patterns that have distinguished Western rationality. Music, he argues, is one of the domains that exhibit such structures. As a specific instance, Weber cites counterpoint as developed in 15th century Europe and – so he claims – culminating in Bach’s music. “No other epoch and culture possesses it”, Weber asserts. Counterpoint’s rationality is meant to manifest itself in rules; yet Weber’s approach lacks an analysis of such rules. Remarkably, (...)
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  21. added 2014-12-22
    Totengespräch zwischen Franz Joseph Haydn aus Rohrau und Anton Friedrich Wilhelm von Webern aus Wien in der musikalischen Unterwelt.Andreas Dorschel - 2010 - In Andreas Dorschel & Federico Celestini (eds.), Arbeit am Kanon: Ästhetische Studien zur Musik von Haydn bis Webern. Universal Edition. pp. 9-15.
    In the spirit of Fontenelle's "Dialogues des morts", Dorschel stages an imaginary conversation between 18th century composer Joseph Haydn and 20th century composer Anton von Webern. In the section of Hades reserved for composers, they confront their different musical poetics.
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  22. added 2014-12-22
    Die Idee des Konservatoriums.Andreas Dorschel - 2010 - In Laurenz Lütteken (ed.), Mendelssohns Welten. Bärenreiter. pp. 89-108.
  23. added 2014-12-22
    ‘Philosopher is a rotten word’. Von Nietzsches zu Delius’ Zarathustra.Andreas Dorschel - 2008 - In Ulrich Tadday (ed.), Frederick Delius. edition text + kritik. pp. 99-116.
    Delius’ Messe des Lebens (1907) transforms Nietzsche’s Also sprach Zarathustra (1883-5) into a Mass, religious services for worshippers of ‚Life‘. An individual reader’s train of thought is thus replaced by a collective experience at grand scale. To achieve that, Delius abandons cognitive, in particular philosophical, as well as satirical and parodistic features of Nietzsche’s Zarathustra. Yet unlike the Christian Mass, Eine Messe des Lebens gathers its congregation less by reference to belief, but rather by virtue of a sequence of musically (...)
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  24. added 2014-12-22
    Arbeit am Kanon: Zu Hugo Wolfs Musikkritiken.Andreas Dorschel - 2007 - Musicologica Austriaca 26:43-52.
    Cultivation of the musical canon and canonisation of truly original work can be identified as guiding principles of both Hugo Wolf’s artistic and his critical practice. The latter is shaped by classicist tropes; they may serve strategic functions as well, yet cannot be reduced to them. While he rejects the merely old-fashioned, Wolf also leads a striking attack on what he terms “modern music”. His endorsed aesthetics intertwine the old and the new.
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  25. added 2014-12-22
    Was ist musikalische Wertungsforschung?Andreas Dorschel - 2004 - Jahrbuch des Staatlichen Instituts Für Musikforschung Preußischer Kulturbesitz:371-385.
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  26. added 2014-12-22
    Rettende Interpretation.Andreas Dorschel - 2003 - In Otto Kolleritsch (ed.), Musikalische Produktion und Interpretation. Zur historischen Unaufhebbarkeit einer ästhetischen Konstellation. Universal Edition. pp. 199-211.
    Aestheticians in the tradition of Critical Theory have claimed that the or a purpose of musical interpretation is somehow to save or salvage or rescue ("retten") the musical work. What sense, if any, can be made of this claim? The notion of salvage or rescue presupposes the concept of danger. Threats to works of art emerge from two sources: from outside and from inside. Whilst the former problem is only touched upon, the latter is discussed in some detail, using the (...)
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  27. added 2014-12-22
    Das ‘Urteil der Geschichte’. Über ‘historische Gerechtigkeit’ in der Wertung musikalischer Werke.Andreas Dorschel - 2003 - Österreichische Musikzeitschrift 58 (2):6-17.
  28. added 2014-12-22
    Utopie und Resignation. Schuberts Deutungen des Sehnsuchtsliedes aus Goethes ‘Wilhelm Meister’ von 1826.Andreas Dorschel - 1997 - Oxford German Studies 26:132-164.
    In the lied, music interprets poetry. Interpretation is not arbitrary. At the same time, there is no such thing as a single correct interpretation of something else – at any rate not of something as complex as a poem by Goethe. Mignon’s song of longing “Nur wer die Sehnsucht kennt, / weiß, was ich leide” can be taken to manifest subjectivity utterly barren within itself. Yet the ability to express that state of mind transcends it; it implies imagination of something (...)
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  29. added 2014-12-17
    Arbeit am Kanon: Ästhetische Studien zur Musik von Haydn bis Webern.Andreas Dorschel & Federico Celestini - 2010 - Universal Edition.
    In 'Arbeit am Kanon', Italian musicologist Federico Celestini and German philosopher Andreas Dorschel discuss aesthetic issues in the work of composers Joseph Haydn, Franz Schubert, Johannes Brahms, Anton Bruckner, Hugo Wolf, Gustav Mahler, Anton Webern, and Franz Schreker.
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  30. added 2014-12-17
    Verwandlungsmusik. Über komponierte Transfigurationen.Andreas Dorschel (ed.) - 2007 - Universal Edition.
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  31. added 2014-12-17
    Tonspuren. Musik im Film: Fallstudien 1994 - 2001.Andreas Dorschel - 2005 - Universal Edition.
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  32. added 2014-12-17
    Vom Genießen. Reflexionen zu Richard Strauss.Andreas Dorschel - 2004 - In Gemurmel unterhalb des Rauschens. Theodor W. Adorno und Richard Strauss. Universal Edition. pp. 23-37.
    The work of Richard Strauss has been disparaged as a music designed to be relished (“Genußmusik” was Adorno’s term), lacking any dimension of ‘transcendence’. The notion of ‘relish’ or ‘pleasure’ (“Genuß”), used for characterization rather than disparagement, can disclose crucial aspects of Strauss’s art, though it does not exhaust it. To oppose ‘relish’ or ‘pleasure’ (“Genuß”) to ‘transcendence’, however, either uses hidden theological premises or disregards that ‘relish’ or ‘pleasure’ (“Genuß”), bound to be pervious to its object, does transcend towards (...)
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  33. added 2014-12-17
    Stilisierte Simplizität. Heines ‘Ich stand in dunkeln Träumen’ in Schuberts Komposition.Andreas Dorschel - 1991 - Heine-Jahrbuch 30:164-186.
    Simplicity can be a complicated matter. This has been notorious in the philosophy of science for some time; but it seems the aesthetics of music yet have to come up to that insight. Song, apparently the plainest of musical genres, turns out to be a rather intricate sort of thing once we try to unravel its puzzle of expression as confluence of words and music. Specifically, Franz Schubert’s Ihr Bild, after Heinrich Heine, achieves simplicity through condensation. The idea of gestural (...)
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  34. added 2014-12-17
    Die Idee der ‘Einswerdung’ in Wagners Tristan.Andreas Dorschel - 1987 - In Heinz-Klaus Metzger & Rainer Riehn (eds.), Richard Wagner, Tristan und Isolde. edition text + kritik. pp. 19-25.
  35. added 2014-12-14
    Gemurmel unterhalb des Rauschens. Theodor W. Adorno und Richard Strauss.Andreas Dorschel (ed.) - 2004 - Universal Edition.
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  36. added 2014-03-30
    Music Quickens Time.Daniel Barenboim - 2009 - Verso.
    In this eloquent book, Daniel Barenboim draws on his profound and uniquely influential engagement with music to argue for its central importance in our everyday lives.
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  37. added 2014-03-30
    Moribund Music: Can Classical Music Be Saved?Carolyn Beckingham - 2009 - Sussex Academic Press.
    What's wrong with music? -- A century of cultural earthquakes -- Crossover music : help or hindrance? -- Opera : a special case? -- Are schools the solution? -- Where do we go from here?
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  38. added 2014-03-29
    Fictional Form and Symphonic Structure: An Essay in Comparative Aesthetics.Peter Kivy - 2009 - Ratio 22 (4):421-438.
    It is agreed on all hands that both fictional narratives and the familiar genres of classical music possess an inner structure that both can be perceived and be appreciated aesthetically. It is my argument here that this inner structure plays a crucially different role in fictional narrative than it does in classical music, confining myself here to 'absolute music' (which is to say, pure instrumental music without text, programme, dramatic setting, or other 'extra-musical' content). The argument, basically, is that whereas (...)
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  39. added 2014-03-28
    The Aesthetics of Western Art Music.Andy Hamilton & Roger Scruton - 1999 - Philosophical Books 40 (3):145-159.
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  40. added 2014-03-28
    Rock Versus Classical Music.Stephen Davies - 1999 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 57 (2):193-204.
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  41. added 2014-03-17
    Classical Music Why Bother?: Hearing the World of Contemporary Culture Through a Composer's Ears.Joshua Fineberg - 2006 - Routledge.
    The famous quip "I don't know much about art, but I know what I like" sums up many people's ideas about how to judge a work of art; but there are inherent limitations if we rely on immediate impressions in judging what should be enduring products of our culture. While some might criticize this as a return to "elitism," Joshua Fineberg argues that without some way of determining intrinsic value, there can be no movement forward for creators or their audience. (...)
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  42. added 2014-03-17
    Intertextuality in Western Art Music.Michael Leslie Klein - 2005 - Indiana University Press.
    Eco, Chopin, and the limits of intertextuality -- The appeal to structure -- On codes, topics, and leaps of interpretation -- Bloom, Freud, and Riffaterre : influence and intertext as signs of the uncanny -- Narrative and intertext : the logic of suffering in Lutosawski's Symphony no. 4.
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  43. added 2014-03-17
    Le Sens de la Musique: 1750-1900: Vivaldi, Beethoven, Berlioz, Liszt, Debussy, Stravinski.Violaine Anger & Jan Willem Noldus (eds.) - 2005 - Rue D'Ulm.
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  44. added 2014-03-16
    Everything is Connected: The Power of Music.Daniel Barenboim - 2008 - Weidenfeld & Nicolson.
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  45. added 2014-03-14
    Western Classical Music and General Education.Estelle Ruth Jorgensen - 2003 - Philosophy of Music Education Review 11 (2):130-140.
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  46. added 2014-03-12
    Why Classical Music Still Mattersby Kramer, Lawrence.Jennifer Judkins - 2008 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 66 (4):418-419.
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  47. added 2014-03-11
    Musical Recordings.Andrew Kania - 2009 - Philosophy Compass 4 (1):22-38.
    In this article, I first consider the metaphysics of musical recordings: their variety, repeatability, and transparency. I then turn to evaluative or aesthetic issues, such as the relative virtues of recordings and live performances, in light of the metaphysical discussion.
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  48. added 2014-03-07
    Silent Music.Andrew Kania - 2010 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 68 (4):343-353.
    In this essay, I investigate musical silence. I first discuss how to integrate the concept of silence into a general theory or definition of music. I then consider the possibility of an entirely silent musical piece. I begin with John Cage’s 4′33″, since it is the most notorious candidate for a silent piece of music, even though it is not, in fact, silent. I conclude that it is not music either, but I argue that it is a piece of non-musical (...)
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  49. added 2014-03-07
    Paradoxes of Communication: The Case of Modern Classical Music.Eduardo De La Fuente - 2010 - Empedocles: European Journal for the Philosophy of Communication 1 (2):237-250.
  50. added 2014-03-02
    Who Needs Classical Music?: Cultural Choice and Musical Value.Julian Johnson - 2002 - Oxford University Press.
    During the last few decades, most cultural critics have come to agree that the division between "high" and "low" art is an artificial one, that Beethoven's Ninth and "Blue Suede Shoes" are equally valuable as cultural texts. In Who Needs Classical Music?, Julian Johnson challenges these assumptions about the relativism of cultural judgements. The author maintains that music is more than just "a matter of taste": while some music provides entertainment, or serves as background noise, other music claims to function (...)
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