About this topic
Summary Climate change threatens to create serious risks, ranging from economic risks to increased risk of death and disease to the complete annihilation of small island states. The field of climate ethics (also known as "climate justice") includes questions about how global society should respond to the creation of such risks and who, exactly, should take responsibility for which parts of that response. Major issues include: How aggressively should society reduce its greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions? How should the burden of achieving those reductions be distributed across and within nations? What role should adaptation play in responding to climate change? Should high emitters pay damages to affected parties? What responsibilities, if any, does climate change impose on individuals? Because climate change is unfolding on a global scale over long periods of time, and because it involves complex issues of politics, science, economics, and technology, answering these questions requires drawing on moral and political philosophy, philosophy of science and epistemology, philosophy of economics, and philosophy of technology, along with a range of other disciplines.
Key works The seminal review of climate ethics is still Gardiner 2004. For collections of key papers on various aspects of climate ethics, see Gardiner et al 2010, which compiles important papers from the first two decades of the field; Arnold 2011, which includes new papers on important issues in climate ethics; and Shue 2014, which collects major papers from one of the most important voices in climate ethics. Important monographs in climate ethics include Gardiner 2011, in which Gardiner delves more deeply into the structure of the moral problems raised by climate change; Broome 2012 and Moellendorf 2014, in which Broome and Moellendorf articulate their respective answers to key questions in climate ethics; and Vanderheiden 2008, in which Vanderheiden addresses issues of climate justice from the perspective of political theory. On the question of individual responsibility for climate change, see Sinnott-Armstrong 2005 (reprinted in Gardiner et al 2010); Hiller 2011, a reply to Sinnott-Armstrong; and for a different approach, Jamieson 1997 (also reprinted in Gardiner et al 2010).
Introductions Chapter 2 of Singer 2002 includes a highly accessible introduction to some key moral issues raised by climate change, suitable for beginning undergraduates. More advanced undergraduates might start with Hayward 2012. Graduate students and professionals looking for a concise survey of climate ethics should consider  Moellendorf 2015. Those looking for more detail, including relevant scientific and economic background, will find it in Gardiner 2004Broome 2012 provides an accessible book-length overview many key issues in climate ethics, along with a primer on climate science and climate economics. For an overview of the literature on climate change and individual responsibilities, see Fragnière 2016.
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  1. added 2020-06-16
    Moral Theory and Climate Change: Ethical Perspectives on a Warming Planet.Ben Eggleston & Dale E. Miller (eds.) - forthcoming - Routledge.
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  2. added 2020-06-16
    Book Review: Capitalism and Climate Change: Theoretical Discussion, Historical Development and Policy responsesKochMax, Capitalism and Climate Change: Theoretical Discussion, Historical Development and Policy Responses. [REVIEW]Andrew Gilbert - 2014 - Thesis Eleven 120 (1):124-127.
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  3. added 2020-06-05
    Collective Inaction and Collective Epistemic Agency.Michael D. Doan - 2020 - In Deborah Tollefsen & Saba Bazargan Forward (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Collective Responsibility. New York, NY, USA: pp. 202-215.
    In this chapter I offer a critique of the received way of thinking about responsibility for collective inaction and propose an alternative approach that takes as its point of departure the epistemic agency exhibited by people navigating impossible situations together. One such situation is becoming increasingly common in the context of climate change: so-called “natural” disasters wreaking havoc on communities—flooding homes, collapsing infrastructures, and straining the capacities of existing organizations to safeguard lives and livelihoods. What happens when philosophical reflection begins (...)
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  4. added 2020-05-21
    Citizenship and the Environment.Kerry Whiteside - 2005 - Political Theory 33 (6):901-904.
  5. added 2020-05-18
    One Child: Do We Have a Right to More? [REVIEW]Erik Magnusson - 2016 - Contemporary Political Theory 15 (4):477-480.
  6. added 2020-05-17
    The Intellectual's New Clothes: Review of Richard Posner, Public Intellectuals: A Study of Decline and Peter Singer, One World: The Ethics of Globalization. [REVIEW]Julian Friedland - 2003 - APA Newsletter on Teaching Philosophy 12.
  7. added 2020-05-16
    Optimal Climate Policy and the Future of World Economic Development.Mark Budolfson, Francis Dennig, Marc Fleurbaey, Noah Scovronick, Asher Siebert, Dean Spears & Fabian Wagner - 2019 - The World Bank Economic Review 33.
    How much should the present generations sacrifice to reduce emissions today, in order to reduce the future harms of climate change? Within climate economics, debate on this question has been focused on so-called “ethical parameters” of social time preference and inequality aversion. We show that optimal climate policy similarly importantly depends on the future of the developing world. In particular, although global poverty is falling and the economic lives of the poor are improving worldwide, leading models of climate economics may (...)
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  8. added 2020-05-16
    The Impact of Human Health Co-Benefits on Evaluations of Global Climate Policy.Noah Scovronick, Mark Budolfson, Francis Dennig, Frank Errickson, Marc Fleurbaey, Wei Peng, Robert H. Socolow, Dean Spears & Fabian Wagner - 2019 - Nature Communications 2095 (19).
    The health co-benefits of CO2 mitigation can provide a strong incentive for climate policy through reductions in air pollutant emissions that occur when targeting shared sources. However, reducing air pollutant emissions may also have an important co-harm, as the aerosols they form produce net cooling overall. Nevertheless, aerosol impacts have not been fully incorporated into cost-benefit modeling that estimates how much the world should optimally mitigate. Here we find that when both co-benefits and co-harms are taken fully into account, optimal (...)
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  9. added 2020-05-10
    Geoengineering the Climate and Ethical Challenges: What We Can Learn From Moral Emotions and Art.Sabine Roeser, Behnam Taebi & Neelke Doorn - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (5):641-658.
  10. added 2020-05-10
    The Justice and Legitimacy of Geoengineering.Stephen Gardiner & Catriona McKinnon - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (5):557-563.
  11. added 2020-05-10
    A Mission-Driven Research Program on Solar Geoengineering Could Promote Justice and Legitimacy.David R. Morrow - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (5):618-640.
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  12. added 2020-05-10
    Fighting Risk with Risk: Solar Radiation Management, Regulatory Drift, and Minimal Justice.Jonathan Wolff - 2020 - Critical Review of International Social and Political Philosophy 23 (5):564-583.
  13. added 2020-05-10
    Feeling the Vibrations: On the Micropolitics of Climate Change.Stephanie Erev - 2019 - Political Theory 47 (6):836-863.
    Climate change is more than a discrete issue demanding political attention and response. A changing climate permeates political life as material processes of planetary change reverberate in our bodies, affecting subterranean processes of attention and evoking bodily responses at and below the threshold of awareness. By way of example, I explore the register of bodily feeling to raise the possibility that proliferating anomalies in atmospheric, oceanic, and seismic activities are entering into subliminal experiences of time and confounding embodied expectations of (...)
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  14. added 2020-05-10
    A Climate of Disorder: What to Do About the Obstacles to Effective Climate Politics.Aaron Maltais - 2016 - In Clare Hayward & Dominic Roser (eds.), Climate Justice in a Non-Ideal World. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. pp. 43-63.
    The emphasis on general distributive principles in the climate justice literature has left significant gaps regarding the problem of weak climate governance. The main contribution of this chapter is to show how normative theory can contribute to addressing the apparent political incapacity to respond to the threat of climate disruption. The chapter argues that a set of six underlying obstacles to effective climate change politics can serve as a framework around which ‘non-ideal’ normative theorizing about climate politics can be organized. (...)
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  15. added 2020-04-28
    Going Green is Good for You: Why We Need to Change the Way We Think About Pro-Environmental Behavior.Michael Prinzing - forthcoming - Ethics, Policy and Environment.
    Awareness and concern about climate change are widespread. But rates of pro-environmental behaviour are low. This is partly due to the way in which pro-environmental behaviour is framed—as a sacrifice or burden that individuals bear for the planet and future generations. This framing elicits well-known cognitive biases, discouraging what we should be encouraging. We should abandon the self-sacrifice framing, and instead frame pro-environmental behaviour as intrinsically desirable. There is a large body of evidence that, around the world, people who are (...)
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  16. added 2020-04-15
    Neorepublicanism and the Domination of Posterity.Corey Katz - 2019 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 22 (2):151-171.
    ABSTRACTSome have recently argued that the current generation dominates future generations by causing long-term climate change. They relate these claims to Philip Pettit and Frank Lovett’s neorepub...
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  17. added 2020-04-08
    Is the Clean Development Mechanism Delivering Benefits to the Poorest Communities in the Developing World? A Critical Evaluation and Proposals for Reforms.Jo Dirix, Wouter Peeters & Sigrid Sterckx - 2016 - Environment, Development and Sustainability 1 (18):839-855.
    This paper explores whether the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM), a flexibility mechanism under the Kyoto Protocol, has contributed to poverty alleviation in countries that host CDM projects. We argue that the CDM should deliver pro-poor benefits to the communities in which projects are established, since poverty alleviation is integral to sustainable development, which is one of the main purposes of the CDM. After briefly discussing the background of the CDM, we discuss assessment difficulties to which research is prone when evaluating (...)
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  18. added 2020-04-08
    Is the EU ETS a Just Climate Policy?Jo Dirix, Wouter Peeters & Sigrid Sterckx - 2015 - New Political Economy 5 (20):702-724.
    The European Union Emissions Trading System (EU ETS) is in dire straits. Prone to design problems and suffering from the effects of the economic crises the scheme is criticised for its poor achievements. In this paper we will analyse some of the features of this situation from an ethical perspective. The major part is dedicated to the complications within each phase of the EU ETS and to the recent developments it has undergone. We will briefly discuss the remedies suggested by (...)
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  19. added 2020-03-17
    Terrestrial: Neither Global nor Local.Walter Kendall - 2018 - The Acorn 18 (1):92-94.
    Today we know that the planet is both too small for the globalization of progress and too large, active, and complex to remain within the local. Latour at this point in his argument postulates an alternative vector that is present and real enough to attract our thoughts from current political-economic categories such as progressive vs. conservative, left vs. right. This alternative vector—the Modern/Terrestrial--is attractive because there is a lingering sense that there was once such a thing as the common good, (...)
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  20. added 2020-03-16
    The Argument Against Neutrality About the Size of Population.David Pomerenke - manuscript
    How should we as a society value changes in population size? The question may be crucial when evaluating global warming scenarios. I defend the intuition of neutrality, which answers a part of the question. It states that – other things being equal – it is ethically irrelevant whether or not additional people are added to a population. The argument against neutrality criticizes the intuition of neutrality as inconsistent. The contribution of this thesis is twofold: First, the framework of welfare economics, (...)
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  21. added 2020-03-10
    Collective Action Problems and Conflicting Obligations.Brian Talbot - 2018 - Philosophical Studies 175 (9):2239-2261.
    Enormous harms, such as climate change, often occur as the result of large numbers of individuals acting separately. In collective action problems, an individual has so little chance of making a difference to these harms that changing their behavior has insignificant expected utility. Even so, it is intuitive that individuals in many collective action problems should not be parts of groups that cause these great harms. This paper gives an account of when we do and do not have obligations to (...)
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  22. added 2020-03-03
    Risk-Reducing Goals: Ideals and Abilities When Managing Complex Environmental Risks.Patrik Baard - 2016 - Journal of Risk Research 19 (2):164-180.
    Social decision-making involving risks ideally results in obligations to avoid expected harms or keep them within acceptable limits. Ambitious goals aimed at avoiding or greatly reducing risks might not be feasible, forcing the acceptance of higher degrees of risk (i.e. unrealistic levels of risk reduction are revised to comport with beliefs regarding abilities). In this paper, the philosophical princi- ple ‘ought implies can’ is applied to the management of complex risks, exempli- fied by the risks associated with climate change. In (...)
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  23. added 2020-02-28
    Leave Only Footprints? Reframing Climate Change, Environmental Stewardship, and Human Impact.Monica Aufrecht - 2017 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 20 (1):84-102.
    Cheryl Hall has argued that framing of climate change must acknowledge the sacrifices needed to reach a sustainable future. This paper builds on that argument. Although it is important to acknowledge the value of what must be sacrificed, this paper argues that current frames about the environment falsely portray humans and the environment as in a zero-sum game, and in doing so ask people to give up the wrong things. This could undermine the public’s trust in environmentalism, and might even (...)
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  24. added 2020-02-24
    Value-Free yet Policy-Relevant? The Normative Views of Climate Scientists and Their Bearing on Philosophy.Torbjørn Gundersen - 2020 - Perspectives on Science 28 (1):89-118.
    The proper role of non-epistemic values such as moral, political, and social values in practices of justification of policy-relevant hypotheses has recently become one of the central questions in philosophy of science. This strand of research has yielded conceptual clarifications and significant insight into the complex and notoriously contentious issue of the proper relationship between science, non-epistemic values, and policymaking. A central part of this discussion revolves around whether scientists should aspire for the value-free ideal, according to which non-epistemic values (...)
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  25. added 2020-02-10
    The Future of Human-Artificial Intelligence Nexus and its Environmental Costs.Petr Spelda & Vit Stritecky - forthcoming - Futures.
    The environmental costs and energy constraints have become emerging issues for the future development of Machine Learning (ML) and Artificial Intelligence (AI). So far, the discussion on environmental impacts of ML/AI lacks a perspective reaching beyond quantitative measurements of the energy-related research costs. Building on the foundations laid down by Schwartz et al., 2019 in the GreenAI initiative, our argument considers two interlinked phenomena, the gratuitous generalisation capability and the future where ML/AI performs the majority of quantifiable inductive inferences. The (...)
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  26. added 2020-01-29
    Do We Have a Residual Obligation to Engineer the Climate, as a Matter of Justice?Patrik Baard & Per Wikman-Svahn - 2016 - In Christopher J. Preston (ed.), Climate Justice and Geoengineering: Ethics and Policy in the Atmospheric Anthropocene. London, Storbritannien:
    This article investigates whether geoengineering can be justified as a residual obligation given that demands related to mitigating emissions of greenhouse gases are left unfulfilled due to conflicting with other demands. Ultimately, it is found that geoengineering cannot be justified due to, amongst other reasons, risks.
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  27. added 2020-01-22
    Delirios Utópicos Suicidas en el Siglo 21 - La filosofía, la naturaleza humana y el colapso de la civilización Artículos y reseñas 2006-2019 5ª edicion.Michael Richard Starks - 2020 - Las Vegas, NV USA: Reality Press.
    El primer grupo de artículos intenta dar una idea de cómo nos comportamos que está razonablemente libre de delirios teóricos. En los siguientes tres grupos, comento tres de las principales ilusiones que impiden un mundo sostenible: la tecnología, la religión y la política (grupos cooperativos). La gente cree que la sociedad puede ser salvada por ellos, por lo que ofrezco algunas sugerencias en el resto del libro en cuanto a por qué esto es poco probable a través de artículos cortos (...)
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  28. added 2020-01-22
    Spinoza and the Possibilities for Radical Climate Ethics.Hasana Sharp - 2017 - Dialogues in Human Geography 7 (2):156-60.
    In this commentary, I respond to the core question of Ruddick’s paper: How does the theoretical dethroning of humanity force us to reinvent ethics? In so doing, I expand on Spinoza’s profound contribution to the radical rethinking of the subject at the level of ontology. Although Ruddick invokes Spinoza, first and foremost, as a potential resource for ethics in light of climate disruption, I conclude that those resources offer only a glimmer of how to live differently. The work of re-imagination (...)
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  29. added 2020-01-14
    Comment on 'The Climate Mitigation Gap: Education and Government Recommendations Miss the Most Effective Individual Actions'.Philippe van Basshuysen & Eric Brandstedt - 2018 - Environmental Research Letters 13 (4):1-3.
    Wynes and Nicholas (2017) argue that the most effective action to reduce individual greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions is to have one fewer child. We raise methodological concerns about the way in which the authors attribute responsibility for emissions: they rely on multiple counting when calculating the emissions of future generations, and they exclude scenarios in which global emission trajectories become net-zero or negative. This may distort recommendations from policy makers and educators who rely on their study. We propose an alternative (...)
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  30. added 2020-01-10
    Kuidas antropotseenis õigesti talitada [How to behave rightly in the Anthropocene].Francesco Orsi - 2019 - Vikerkaar 9 (September 2019).
    A quick overview of the main ethical and ethical-political alternatives facing our moral predicament in the so-called Anthropocene, striking a note of relative optimism. (I'll be happy to share an English version on request.).
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  31. added 2020-01-06
    Putting Sustainability Into Sustainable Human Development.Wouter Peeters, jo Dirix & Sigrid Sterckx - 2013 - Journal of Human Development and Capabilities 1 (14):58-76.
    Abating the threat climate change poses to the lives of future people clearly challenges our development models. The 2011 Human Devel- opment Report rightly focuses on the integral links between sustainability and equity. However, the human development and capabilities approach emphasizes the expansion of people’s capabilities simpliciter, which is ques- tionable in view of environmental sustainability. We argue that capabilities should be defined as triadic relations between an agent, constraints and poss- ible functionings. This triadic syntax particularly applies to climate (...)
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  32. added 2020-01-02
    Climate Engineering: A Normative Perspective.Daniel Edward Callies - 2019 - Lexington Books.
    Should we research, develop, and deploy climate engineering technology? Drawing upon contemporary moral and political theory, this book offers a normative perspective on such questions, ultimately making the case in favor of research and regulation guided by norms of legitimacy, distributive justice, and procedural justice.
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  33. added 2019-11-27
    Copenhague y el cambio climático.David Villena Saldaña - 2010 - Razón y Asuntos Públicos 15 (15):1-3.
    This paper discusses ethical issues related to the 2009 United Nations Climate Change Conference held in Copenhagen.
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  34. added 2019-11-20
    Toward A Capability-Based Account of Intergenerational Justice.Alex Richardson - 2018 - Ethic@ - An International Journal for Moral Philosophy 3 (17):363-388.
    In this paper, I draw on the capabilities approach to social justice and human development as advanced, among others, by Amartya Sen and Martha Nussbaum, and seek to provide some theoretical resources for better understanding our obligations to future persons. It is my hope that the capabilities approach, properly applied, can give us a novel way of understanding our responsibilities toward future generations in a time where such an understanding is both unfortunately lacking and increasingly needed. Structurally, the paper proceeds (...)
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  35. added 2019-11-19
    The Nature of Climate Science: Challenges for the Development of Climate Change Science Literacy in Education.Raymond Ndubisi Anyanwu - 2019 - Africa International Journal of Multidisciplinary Research 2 (5).
    Despite raising awareness and promoting knowledge and skills-development for education about climate change, efforts by the education sector to promote the development of climate change science literacy in schools is challenged by the nature of climate science. We illuminated the nature of climate science by analysing literature on the nature of science that foregrounds discussions in climate science, and found that climate science involves mostly complex systems and problems; the scope of climate science is vast and interdisciplinary; most issues and (...)
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  36. added 2019-11-06
    Quenched: Five Fires for Thinking Extinction.Jemma Deer - 2019 - Oxford Literary Review 41 (1):1-17.
    By the light or remains of five fires, this paper considers how the current extinction crisis might be thought in relation to the future and the past, to speed and acceleration, to ir/reversibility...
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  37. added 2019-10-24
    Conflicting Advice: Resolving Conflicting Moral Recommendations in Climate and Environmental Ethics.Patrik Baard - forthcoming - In Brian Henning & Zack Walsh (eds.), Climate Change Ethics and the Non-Human World. New York, USA:
    Climate ethics and environmental ethics sometimes provide conflicting action guidance. For instance, favored climate policies to avoid global mean increases beyond 1.5-2 °C may have detrimental effects on biodiversity by requiring transforming environmental areas into croplands for bioenergy and for negative emission technologies. From this follows a potential moral conflict between the demands of climate ethics, according to which transforming natural ecosystems to cropland for bioenergy is permissible and perhaps even obligatory if it reduces risks of climate change, and the (...)
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  38. added 2019-10-23
    Moral Responsibility for Distant Collective Harms.David Zoller - 2015 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 18 (5):995-1010.
    While it is well recognized that many everyday consumer behaviors, such as purchases of sweatshop goods, come at a cost to the global poor, it has proven difficult to argue that even knowing, repeat contributors are somehow morally complicit in those outcomes. Some recent approaches contend that marginal contributions to distant harms are consequences that consumers straightforwardly should have born in mind, which would make consumers seem reckless or negligent. Critics reasonably reply that the bad luck that my innocent purchase (...)
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  39. added 2019-09-19
    The Global Climate Regime and Transitional Justice, Sonja Klinsky and Jasmina Brankovic , 196 Pp., $140 Cloth, $54.95 eBook. [REVIEW]Megan Blomfield - 2019 - Ethics and International Affairs 33 (2):245-247.
  40. added 2019-09-19
    Global Justice, Natural Resources, and Climate Change.Megan Blomfield - 2019 - Oxford University Press.
    To address climate change fairly, many conflicting claims over natural resources must be balanced against one another. This has long been obvious in the case of fossil fuels and greenhouse gas sinks including the atmosphere and forests; but it is ever more apparent that responses to climate change also threaten to spur new competition over land and extractive resources. This makes climate change an instance of a broader, more enduring and - for many - all too familiar problem: the problem (...)
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  41. added 2019-09-09
    The Social Epistemology of Consensus and Dissent.Boaz Miller - 2019 - In David Henderson, Peter Graham, Miranda Fricker & Nikolaj Jang Lee Linding Pedersen (eds.), The Routledge Handbook of Social Epistemology. New York: Routledge. pp. 228-237.
    This paper reviews current debates in social epistemology about the relations ‎between ‎knowledge ‎and consensus. These relations are philosophically interesting on their ‎own, but ‎also have ‎practical consequences, as consensus takes an increasingly significant ‎role in ‎informing public ‎decision making. The paper addresses the following questions. ‎When is a ‎consensus attributable to an epistemic community? Under what conditions may ‎we ‎legitimately infer that a consensual view is knowledge-based or otherwise ‎epistemically ‎justified? Should consensus be the aim of scientific inquiry, and (...)
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  42. added 2019-08-23
    Human Enhancement and the Proper Response to Climate Change.James Fanciullo - 2020 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 23 (1):85-96.
    Several philosophers have argued that human enhancements should be considered a potential solution to climate change. In this paper, I consider one such argument offered by S. Matthew Liao, Anders Sandberg, and Rebecca Roache. I argue that, while their argument is plausible, we have an even stronger reason to consider enhancements a potential solution. In particular, enhancements could align our interests with the promotion of a proper response to climate change: if enhancements were in our interest to adopt and also (...)
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  43. added 2019-08-14
    Climate Change and Spiritual Transformation.David John Midgley - 2007 - In Mary Midgley (ed.), Earthy Realism: The Meaning of Gaia. Exeter, UK: pp. 95-101.
    The continued failure of our civilisation to mobilise an adequate response to the crisis of climate change is traced to a pathological condition of culture analogous to addiction in the case of an individual. The exponential increase in the use of fossil fuel energy has both fuelled, and been driven by, an increasingly mechanistic and materialistic world-outlook that is inimical to acceptance of the measures needed to prevent catastrophic anthropogenic climate change. A holistic view of nature, drawn from such disciplines (...)
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  44. added 2019-07-24
    The Case for Emissions Egalitarianism.Olle Torpman - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (3):749-762.
    There is a fixed limit on the greenhouse gas emissions that the atmosphere can absorb before triggering dangerous climate changes. One of the debates in climate ethics concerns how the available emissions should be divided between people. One popular answer, sometimes called “Emissions Egalitarianism”, proposes a distribution of emissions permits that gives everyone an equal per capita share of the atmospheric absorptive capacity. However, several debaters have objected to EE. First, it has been argued that there is no principled reason (...)
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  45. added 2019-07-12
    Climate Justice, Climate Policy, and the Role of Political Philosophy.Brian Berkey - 2019 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 22 (2):145-147.
  46. added 2019-07-10
    The Normative Orientations of Climate Scientists.Dennis Bray & Hans Storch - 2017 - Science and Engineering Ethics 23 (5):1351-1367.
    In 1942 Robert K. Merton tried to demonstrate the structure of the normative system of science by specifying the norms that characterized it. The norms were assigned the abbreviation CUDOs: Communism, Universalism, Disinterestedness, and Organized skepticism. Using the results of an on-line survey of climate scientists concerning the norms of science, this paper explores the climate scientists’ subscription to these norms. The data suggests that while Merton’s CUDOs remain the overall guiding moral principles, they are not fully endorsed or present (...)
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  47. added 2019-06-21
    Toward a Small Family Ethic: How Overpopulation and Climate Change Are Affecting the Morality of Procreation by Travis Rieder.Trevor Hedberg - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 28 (4):8-13.
    Travis Rieder's Toward a Small Family Ethic confronts the effects of population growth and addresses what individual procreative obligations might follow from it. In this review, I summarize the main arguments that Rieder deploys to defend his position that those with large ecological footprints morally ought to follow a small family ethic. I express sympathy with some of his claims and praise the book's accessibility, but its short length inevitably means that some important issues are omitted or given only superficial (...)
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  48. added 2019-06-14
    Climate Apartheid: The Forgetting of Race in the Anthropocene. Tuana - 2019 - Critical Philosophy of Race 7 (1):1.
    Despite recognition of the gender dimensions of climate change, there is little attention to racism in climate justice perspectives. In response, this article advocates developing an ecologically informed intersectional approach designed to disclose the ways racism contributes to the construction of illegible lives in the domain of climate policies and practices. Differential impacts of climate change, while an important dimension, is ultimately inadequate to understanding and responding to both climate justice and environmental racism. What is required is a rich understanding (...)
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  49. added 2019-06-11
    Divergent Perspectives on Expert Disagreement: Preliminary Evidence From Climate Science, Climate Policy, Astrophysics, and Public Opinion.James R. Beebe, Maria Baghramian, Luke Drury & Finnur Dellsén - 2019 - Environmental Communication 13:35-50.
    We report the results of an exploratory study that examines the judgments of climate scientists, climate policy experts, astrophysicists, and non-experts (N = 3367) about the factors that contribute to the creation and persistence of disagreement within climate science and astrophysics and about how one should respond to expert disagreement. We found that, as compared to non-experts, climate experts believe that within climate science (i) there is less disagreement about climate change, (ii) methodological factors play less of a role in (...)
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  50. added 2019-06-06
    A “Natural” Proposal For Addressing Climate Change.Thomas E. Lovejoy - 2014 - Ethics and International Affairs 28 (3):359-363.
    One of the fundamental challenges of climate change is that we contribute to it increment by increment, and experience it increment by increment after a considerable time lag. As a consequence, it is very difficult to see what we are doing to ourselves, to future generations, and to the living planet as a whole. There are monumental ethical issues involved, but they are obscured by the incremental nature of the process and the long time frame before reaching the concentration of (...)
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