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  1. Solving the Stem Cell and Cloning Puzzle.Julian Savulescu - manuscript
    , from Oxford Uehiro Centre for Practical Ethics Julian Savulescu’s comment on the ethics of using embryos for medical research. To be published in The Age.
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  2. Human Reproductive Cloning: Science, Jewish Law and Metaphysics.Barbara Pfeffer Billauer - forthcoming - ssrn.com.
    Abstract: Under traditional Jewish Law (halacha), assessment of human reproductive cloning (HRC) has been formulated along four lines of inquiry, which I discussed in Part I of this paper. Therein I also analyze five relevant doctrines of Talmudic Law, concluding that under with a risk-benefit analysis HRC fails to fulfill the obligation ‘to be fruitful and multiply’ and should be strictly prohibited. Here, I review of the topic from an exigetical Biblical and Kabbalistic perspective, beginning with exploring comments of the (...)
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  3. Editorial: It's Cloning Again!Nikola Biller-Andorno - forthcoming - Journal of Medical Ethics.
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  4. 1.5. Legal Limitations on Research and its Results? The Cloning Paradigm.Carlos M. Romeo Casabona - forthcoming - Bioethics in Asia: The Proceedings of the Unesco Asian Bioethics Conference (Abc'97) and the Who-Assisted Satellite Symposium on Medical Genetics Services, 3-8 Nov, 1997 in Kobe/Fukui, Japan, 3rd Murs Japan International Symposium, 2nd Congress of the Asi.
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  5. Cloning of Animals and Humans.Harry Griffin - forthcoming - Bioethics for Scientists:279--296.
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  6. Genetic Ethics Group December 11, 2002 Ethics of Human Cloning The Ethical Controversy Surrounding Genetic Research and Cloning in Particular Has. [REVIEW]Michelle Latt - forthcoming - Ethics.
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  7. 8.4. Human Genetics and the Integrity of Self: Germline Gene Therapy and Cloning.Maurizio Salvi - forthcoming - Bioethics in Asia: The Proceedings of the Unesco Asian Bioethics Conference (Abc'97) and the Who-Assisted Satellite Symposium on Medical Genetics Services, 3-8 Nov, 1997 in Kobe/Fukui, Japan, 3rd Murs Japan International Symposium, 2nd Congress of the Asi.
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  8. How to Play the “Playing God” Card.Moti Mizrahi - 2020 - Science and Engineering Ethics 26 (3):1445-1461.
    When the phrase “playing God” is used in debates concerning the use of new technologies, such as cloning or genetic engineering, it is usually interpreted as a warning not to interfere with God’s creation or nature. I think that this interpretation of “playing God” arguments as a call to non-interference with nature is too narrow. In this paper, I propose an alternative interpretation of “playing God” arguments. Taking an argumentation theory approach, I provide an argumentation scheme and accompanying critical questions (...)
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  9. Cloning Centering at Egoism.Yusuke Kaneko - 2019 - The Basis : The Annual Bulletin of Research Center for Liberal Education 9:245-260.
    Cloning research caught a great deal of attention when Dolly the sheep was born (§4). While some fear surrounded the attainment (§§14-15), Wilmutʼs research itself has grown well, providing a less vicious manner to gain ES cells (§12). In this article, we review the progress of cloning research along with the concern of medical circles about its application to reproductive cloning, that is to say, making replicas of human beings (§§16-21). Note that all the content is ascribed to the author (...)
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  10. Defending Eugenics: From Cryptic Choice to Conscious Selection.Jonny Anomaly - 2018 - Monash Bioethics Review 35:24-35.
  11. How Should One Live? An Introduction to Ethics and Moral Reasoning.Bradley Thames - 2018 - San Diego, CA, USA: Bridgepoint Education.
    This book provides an entry-level introduction to philosophical ethics, theories of moral reasoning, and selected issues in applied ethics. Chapter 1 describes the importance of philosophical approaches to ethical issues, the general dialectical form of moral reasoning, and the broad landscape of moral philosophy. Chapter 2 presents egoism and relativism as challenges to the presumed objectivity and unconditionality of morality. Chapters 3, 4 and 5 discuss utilitarianism, deontology, and virtue ethics, respectively. Each chapter begins with a general overview of the (...)
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  12. Conservation in a Brave New World.Douglas Ian Campbell & Patrick Michael Whittle - 2017 - In Resurrecting Extinct Species: Ethics and Authenticity. Cham: Palgrave Macmillan. pp. 1-28.
    This chapter introduces the two main philosophical questions that are raised by the prospect of extinct species being brought back from the dead—namely, the ‘Authenticity Question’ and the ‘Ethical Question’. It distinguishes different types of de-extinction, and different methods by which de-extinction can be accomplished. Finally, it examines the aims of wildlife conservation with a view to whether they are compatible with de-extinction, or not.
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  13. Emotional Reactions to Human Reproductive Cloning.Joshua May - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (1):26-30.
    [Selected as EDITOR'S CHOICE] Background: Extant surveys of people’s attitudes toward human reproductive cloning focus on moral judgments alone, not emotional reactions or sentiments. This is especially important given that some (esp. Leon Kass) have argued against such cloning on the grounds that it engenders widespread negative emotions, like disgust, that provide a moral guide. Objective: To provide some data on emotional reactions to human cloning, with a focus on repugnance, given its prominence in the literature. Methods: This brief mixed-method (...)
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  14. Repugnance as Performance Error: The Role of Disgust in Bioethical Intuitions.Joshua May - 2016 - In Steve Clarke, Julian Savulescu, C. A. J. Coady, Alberto Giubilini & Sagar Sanyal (eds.), The Ethics of Human Enhancement: Understanding the Debate. Oxford University Press. pp. 43-57.
    An influential argument in bioethics involves appeal to disgust, calling on us to take it seriously as a moral guide (e.g. Kass, Miller, Kahan). Some argue, for example, that genetic enhancement, especially via human reproductive cloning, is repellant or grotesque. While objectors have argued that repugnance is morally irrelevant (e.g. Nussbaum, Kelly), I argue that the problem is more fundamental: it is psychologically irrelevant. Examining recent empirical data suggests that disgust’s influence on moral judgment may be like fatigue: an exogenous (...)
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  15. Public Goods and Procreation.Jonny Anomaly - 2014 - Monash Bioethics Review 32 (3-4):172-188.
  16. Cancer, Conflict, and the Development of Nuclear Transplantation Techniques.Nathan Crowe - 2014 - Journal of the History of Biology 47 (1):63-105.
    The technique of nuclear transplantation – popularly known as cloning – has been integrated into several different histories of twentieth century biology. Historians and science scholars have situated nuclear transplantation within narratives of scientific practice, biotechnology, bioethics, biomedicine, and changing views of life. However, nuclear transplantation has never been the focus of analysis. In this article, I examine the development of nuclear transplantation techniques, focusing on the people, motivations, and institutions associated with the first successful nuclear transfer in metazoans in (...)
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  17. Nonreductive Moral Classification and the Limits of Philosophy.Thomas V. Cunningham - 2014 - American Journal of Bioethics 14 (2):22-24.
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  18. Clones as Epistemic Objects: Conceptual Processes of the Configuration of Knowledge.Stefan Halft - 2014 - Contributions to the History of Concepts 9 (2):73-89.
    The creation of life has always spurred literary and cinematic productivity. Due to scientific progress in the fields of microbiology and genetics, countless novels and films today reflect the idea of human cloning more than other ideas. While the clone is often seen as the epitome of the posthuman, contemporary texts and films tend to modify the concept and humanize the clone. It can be said that fictional literature and films play a pivotal role in the construction, modification, and circulation (...)
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  19. Time to Exorcise the Cloning Demon.John Harris - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (1):53-62.
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  20. Ein bisschen Embryo? Begriffliche, ontologische und normative Überlegungen zur totipotenzbasierten Legaldefinition von 'Embryo'.Geert Keil - 2014 - In Thomas Heinemann Hans-Georg Dederer & Tobias Cantz (eds.), Entwicklungsbiologische Totipotenz in Ethik und Recht. Zur normativen Bewertung von totipotenten menschlichen Zellen. pp. 251-287.
    Im deutschen Embryonenschutz- und im Stammzellgesetz sind zwei Rechtsbegriffe von 'Embryo' definiert worden, die sich auf die Zelleigenschaft der Totipotenz stützen und dieser damit eine ontologische und normative Bedeutung beimessen, die angesichts der vielfältigen divergierenden Intuitionen und Argumente zur sogenannten Statusfrage nicht leicht zu rechtfertigen ist. Der vorliegende Beitrag diskutiert die Schwierigkeiten, den ontologischen, moralischen und rechtlichen Status totipotenter Humanzellen plausibel zu begründen, und argumentiert insbesondere, dass zwischen Grundannahmen der Substanzontologie und naturphilosophischen Kontinuitätsüberlegungen unaufhebbare Spannungen bestehen, die der Gesetzgeber durch (...)
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  21. Response to Strong and Beauchamp.Rebecca Kukla - 2014 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 23 (1):99-103.
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  22. Questioning Cloning with Genealogy.Emmanuel Ifeanyi Ani - 2013 - Open Journal of Philosophy 3 (3):376-379.
    I evaluate a hypothetical society of human clones. Cloning implies the production of exact copies of an organism from a replication of one of the organism’s cells without any recourse to the genealogical protocol of male and female reproduction. I thus pose the question: Can we regard a cloned copy of Mr. James as a son of Mr. James or Mr. James once again? I consider certain implications of human cloning to the concepts of individual uniqueness, and thus of genealogical (...)
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  23. What Justifies the Ban on Federal Funding for Nonreproductive Cloning?Thomas V. Cunningham - 2013 - Medicine, Health Care, and Philosophy 16:825-841.
    This paper explores how current United States policies for funding nonreproductive cloning are justified and argues against that justification. I show that a common conceptual framework underlies the national prohibition on the use of public funds for cloning research, which I call the simple argument. This argument rests on two premises: that research harming human embryos is unethical and that embryos produced via fertilization are identical to those produced via cloning. In response to the simple argument, I challenge the latter (...)
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  24. Were It Physically Safe, Reproductive Human Cloning Would Be Acceptable.Katrien Devolder - 2013 - In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. Wiley. pp. 79--88.
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  25. A Reply to Levick's' Were It Physically Safe, Reproductive Human Cloning Would Not Be Acceptable'.Katrien Devolder - 2013 - In Arthur L. Caplan & Robert Arp (eds.), Contemporary Debates in Bioethics. Wiley. pp. 98--100.
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  26. Potentiality Arguments and the Definition of “Human Organism”.Annette Dufner - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (1):33-34.
    Bettina Schöne-Seifert and Marco Stier present a host of detailed and intriguing arguments to the effect that potentiality arguments have to be viewed as outdated due to developments in stem cell research, in particular the possibility of re-setting the development potential of differentiated cells, such as skin cells. However, their argument leaves them without an explanation of the intuitive difference between skin cells and human beings, which seems to be based on the assumption that a skin cell is merely part (...)
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  27. Gregory Pence: How to Build a Better Human: An Ethical Blueprint. Rowman & Litlefield Publishers, Inc.: Plymouth, UK, 2012. [REVIEW]Andrew Hotke - 2013 - Bioethics 27 (9):516-517.
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  28. Review of Gregory Pence, How to Build a Better Human: An Ethical Blueprint. [REVIEW]William P. Kabasenche - 2013 - American Journal of Bioethics 13 (5):72-73.
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  29. Hybrid Times: Theses on the Temporalities of Cloning.Christina Brandt - 2012 - History and Philosophy of the Life Sciences 35 (1):75-81.
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  30. What People Think About Cloning? Social Representation of This Technique and its Associated Emotions.Mihai Curelaru, Adrian Neculau & Mioara Cristea - 2012 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (31):3-30.
    This study explores the social representations of cloning taking in consideration a series of associated emotions and the subjects' level of religiosity. The participants in our study consisted of 356 subjects of different ages and professions. The data collection included four tasks for the subjects to fill in. First, they had to fill in a free task association: starting from the stimulus-word „cloning" they had to associate five words or expressions, and then rank these five words according to their importance. (...)
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  31. Clones, Fakes and Posthumans: Cultures of Replication.Philomena Essed & Gabriele Schwab - 2012 - Rodopi.
    Clones, Fakes and Posthumans: Cultures of Replication explores cloning and related phenomena that inform each other, like twins, fakes, replica, or homogeneities, through a cultural prism. What could it mean to think of a cloning mentality? Could it be that a “cloning culture” has made biotechnological cloning desirable in the first place, and vice versa that biotechnological cloning then enforces technologies of social and cultural cloning? What does it mean to say that a culture replicates? If biotechnological cloning has to (...)
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  32. Developments in Stem Cell Research and Therapeutic Cloning: Islamic Ethical Positions, a Review.Hossam E. Fadel - 2012 - Bioethics 26 (3):128-135.
    Stem cell research is very promising. The use of human embryos has been confronted with objections based on ethical and religious positions. The recent production of reprogrammed adult (induced pluripotent) cells does not – in the opinion of scientists – reduce the need to continue human embryonic stem cell research. So the debate continues.Islam always encouraged scientific research, particularly research directed toward finding cures for human disease. Based on the expectation of potential benefits, Islamic teachings permit and support human embryonic (...)
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  33. Human Cloning and the Myth of Disenchantment.Staicu Laurențiu - 2012 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (31):148-169.
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  34. What People Think About Cloning? Social Reprezentatione of This Tehnique and its Asociated Emotions.Cristea Mioara, Neculau Adrian & Curelaru Mihai - 2012 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (31):3-30.
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  35. Procreative Liberty, Enhancement and Commodification in the Human Cloning Debate.Sandra Shapshay - 2012 - Health Care Analysis 20 (4):356-366.
    The aim of this paper is to scrutinize a contemporary standoff in the American debate over the moral permissibility of human reproductive cloning in its prospective use as a eugenic enhancement technology. I shall argue that there is some significant and under-appreciated common ground between the defenders and opponents of human cloning. Champions of the moral and legal permissibility of cloning support the technology based on the right to procreative liberty provided it were to become as safe as in vitro (...)
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  36. Human Cloning and the Myth of Disenchantment.Laurentiu Staicu - 2012 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 11 (31):148-169.
    This study has a twofold objective: firstly, it aims to examine the main types of argument that have been formulated against human cloning, to identify their presuppositions and to evaluate their strength; secondly, it aims to argue that the most important objections against human cloning are philosophical and religious, in particular the objection that human cloning represents a radical form of disenchantment or an abuse of rationality. The birth of a cloned mammal, a sheep named Dolly, which was announced on (...)
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  37. On Classical Cloning and No-Cloning.Nicholas J. Teh - 2012 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part B: Studies in History and Philosophy of Modern Physics 43 (1):47-63.
  38. Human Cloning: Comments on Iftime.K. Verma - 2012 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 22 (4):163-164.
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  39. Reconsidering Risk to Women: Oocyte Donation for Human Embryonic Stem Cell Research.Rebecca Bamford - 2011 - American Journal of Bioethics 11 (9):37-39.
    The American Journal of Bioethics, Volume 11, Issue 9, Page 37-39, September 2011.
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  40. Human Cloning From the Viewpoint of Islamic Fiqh and Ethics.Sm Mohaghegh Damad - 2011 - Asian Bioethics Review 3 (4):342-350.
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  41. Three Levels of Discourse on Human Reproductive Cloning in Japan.Aizawa Kuniko - 2011 - Eubios Journal of Asian and International Bioethics 21 (1-2):18-23.
    This paper reviews three levels of discourse on human reproductive cloning in Japan: everyday life, fundamental theory, and public policy. In addition to articles with headlines on HRC in the Asahi Shimbun newspaper, 224 publications were found on HRC and categorized by publication year, author specialties, and contents. Contents of 100 publications were assigned to the following categories: cultural differences, acceptance of HRC, aversions to HRC, arguments against HRC , rebuttals and utilitarian arguments, arguments concerning regulation, and ethical principles, including (...)
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  42. Australia's Cloning and Embryo Research Laws.Kevin McGovern - 2011 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 16 (4):1.
    McGovern, Kevin This article explores the report of the 2010 independent review committee into Australia's cloning and embryo research laws. Its author, the Director of the Centre, was one of the five members of this committee.
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  43. What Puts the 'Yuck' in the Yuck Factor?Jussi Niemelä - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (5):267-279.
    The advances in biotechnology have given rise to a discussion concerning the strong emotional reaction expressed by the public towards biotechnological innovations. This reaction has been named the ‘Yuck-factor’ by several theorists of bioethics. Leon Kass, the former chairman of the President's council on bioethics, has appraised this public reaction as ‘an emotional expression of deep wisdom, beyond reason's power fully to articulate it’.1 Similar arguments have been forwarded by the Catholic Church, several Protestant denominations and the Pro-Life movement. Several (...)
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  44. Therapeutic Access to the Embryo.Mark F. Repenshek - 2011 - The National Catholic Bioethics Quarterly 11 (4):735-756.
    Genomic interventions ex utero and in utero are already a reality in medicine. It is plausible to believe that this reality will lead to therapies at the preimplantation level, especially where such interventions are the only safe and effective way to truly prevent human suffering and disease in offspring. The plausibility of this type of genomic therapy is of particular interest for prospective parents who are Roman Catholic, since in vitro fertilization provides the only means by which an offspring’s genome (...)
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  45. An Argument Against Cloning.Jaime Ahlberg & Harry Brighouse - 2010 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 40 (4):539-566.
    It is technically possible to clone a human being. The result of the procedure would be a human being in its own right. Given the current level of cloning technology concerning other animals there is every reason to believe that early human clones will have shorter-than-average life-spans, and will be unusually prone to disease. In addition, they would be unusually at risk of genetic defects, though they would still, probably, have lives worth living. But with experimentation and experience, seriously unequal (...)
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  46. Therapeutic Cloning: The Ethical Road to Regulation. Part I: Arguments For and Against & Regulations.Alistair Brown - 2010 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 15 (2):75-86.
    In analysing the position adopted by the United Kingdom over therapeutic cloning, this paper will endeavour to examine the question of regulation, its necessity and extent. This will be achieved through considering different models of relevant theoretical discourse before, in applying that discourse to identified systems of regulation, the advantages and pitfalls of each system will be assessed in the hope of reaching a solution appropriate to the sensitive, yet dynamic, needs of the issue.
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  47. Therapeutic Cloning: The Ethical Road to Regulation - Part II: Analysing the UK Position.Alistair Brown - 2010 - Human Reproduction and Genetic Ethics 16 (1):60-73.
    It will be remembered that the introductory chapter to this paper differentiated between human therapeutic cloning and embryonic stem cell research, with the former concept encapsulating the latter one. In turning to examine the current system of regulation found within the United Kingdom this has particular relevance as it is only the practice of therapeutic cloning – the creation and use of an embryo – which engages with the regulative measures adopted.
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  48. Human Cloning Through the Eyes of Muslim Scholars: The New Phenomenon of the Islamic International Religioscientific Institutions.Mohammed Ghaly - 2010 - Zygon 45 (1):7-35.
    . In the wake of the February 1997 announcement that Dolly the sheep had been cloned, Muslim religious scholars together with Muslim scientists held two conferences to discuss cloning from an Islamic perspective. They were organized by two influential Islamic international religioscientific institutions: the Islamic Organization of Medical Sciences and the International Islamic Fiqh Academy. Both institutions comprise a large number of prominent religious scholars and well‐known scientists who participated in the discussions at the conferences. This article gives a comprehensive (...)
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  49. Human Reproductive Cloning: A Conflict of Liberties.Joyce C. Havstad - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (2):71-77.
    Proponents of human reproductive cloning do not dispute that cloning may lead to violations of clones' right to self-determination, or that these violations could cause psychological harms. But they proceed with their endorsement of human reproductive cloning by dismissing these psychological harms, mainly in two ways. The first tactic is to point out that to commit the genetic fallacy is indeed a mistake; the second is to invoke Parfit's non-identity problem. The argument of this paper is that neither approach succeeds (...)
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  50. An Analysis of Some Arguments for and Against Human Reproduction.Matti Häyry - 2010 - In Arguments and Analysis in Bioethics. Rodopi.
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