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  1. Alzheimer Disease, MCI and Beyond.Building A. Mystery - 2006 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):61-74.
  2. Intuition and Autism: A Possible Role for Von Economo Neurons.John M. Allman, Karli K. Watson, Nicole A. Tetreault & Atiya Y. Hakeem - 2005 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 9 (8):367-373.
  3. Comprehending the Distinctively Sexual Nature of the Conduct.Jami L. Anderson - 2010 - Sex, Drugs and Rock and Roll.
    Since the 1970s, sexual assault laws have evolved to include prohibitions of sexual acts with cognitively impaired individuals. The argument justifying this prohibition is typically as follows: A sex act that is forced (without the legally valid consent of) someone is sexual assault. Cognitively impaired individuals, because they lack certain intellectual abilities, cannot give legally valid consent. Therefore, cognitively impaired individuals cannot consent to sex. Therefore, sex acts with cognitively impaired individuals is sexual assault. The prohibition of sex with such (...)
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  4. The Philosophy of Autism.Jami L. Anderson & Simon Cushing (eds.) - 2012 - Rowman & Littlefield Publishers.
    This book examines autism from the tradition of analytic philosophy, working from the premise that Autism Spectrum Disorders raise interesting philosophical questions that need to be and can be addressed in a manner that is clear, jargon-free, and accessible. The goal of the original essays in this book is to provide a philosophically rich analysis of issues raised by autism and to afford dignity and respect to those impacted by autism by placing it at the center of the discussion.
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  5. What to Tell and How to Tell: A Qualitative Study of Information Sharing in Research for Adults with Intellectual Disability.D. Andre-Barron, A. Strydom & A. Hassiotis - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (6):501-506.
    Objectives: To explore opinions and attitudes regarding the current information-giving practices in research involving adults with intellectual disabilities.Design: Qualitative focus group study with a purposive sample.Setting: An intellectual disabilities service within the NHSParticipants: A sample of 26 individuals including adults with mild intellectual disability, carers, clinicians, care managers and the charitable sector.Results: Three main themes were identified: process, format, and content. There was agreement that there is a need for improvement in the process and quality of information giving. With regard (...)
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  6. Speaking Without Interpreting: A Reply to Bouma on Autism and Davidsonian Interpretation.Kristin Andrews & Ljiljana Radenovic - 2006 - Philosophical Psychology 19 (5):663 – 678.
    We clarify some points previously made by Andrews, and defend the claim that Davidson's account of belief can be and is challenged by the existence of some people with autism. We argue that both Bouma and Andrews (Philosophical Psychology, 15) blurred the subtle distinctions between the psychological concepts of theory of mind and joint attention and the Davidsonian concepts of interpretation and triangulation. And we accept that appeal to control group studies is not the appropriate place to look for an (...)
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  7. Growth Attenuation: To the Editor:To the Editor:To the Editor:To the Editor:Benjamin S. Wilfond Replies Health Outcomes and Social Services.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (5).
    To the Editor: In the November–December 2010 issue, the Seattle Growth Attenuation and Ethics Working Group (“Navigating Growth Attenuation in Children with Profound Disabilities”) analyzed the arguments for and against growth attenuation in children with permanent, profound intellectual disabilities and identified conditions under which its use may be ethically acceptable. The working group’s conclusion is based on a particular construction of the issue that is not always justified. It focuses on the possibility that growth attenuation will increase children’s involvement in (...)
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  8. Sterilization and a Mentally Handicapped Minor: Providing Consent for One Who Cannot.Gabrielle M. Applebaum & John La Puma - 1994 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 3 (2):209.
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  9. Prenatally Diagnosed Foetal Malformations and Termination of Pregnancy: The Case of Lebanon.Thalia Arawi & Anwar Nassar - 2011 - Developing World Bioethics 11 (1):40-47.
    Termination of pregnancy (TOP) is offered in many countries, for foetuses prenatally diagnosed with congenital malformations that are deemed incompatible with life or that are associated with a high morbidity. In Lebanon, a middle income country where religion plays a focal role, the law prohibits any form of TOP unless it is the only means to save the mother's life. It is the contention of the authors of this article that even if the foetus is a person, if it were (...)
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  10. Recognizing Death While Affirming Life: Can End of Life Reform Uphold a Disabled Person's Interest in Continued Life?Adrienne Asch - 2005 - Hastings Center Report 35 (6):s31-s36.
  11. Criticizing and Reforming Segregated Facilities for Persons with Disabilities.Adrienne Asch, Jeffrey Blustein & David T. Wasserman - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2-3):157-168.
    In this paper, we critically appraise institutions for people with disabilities, from residential facilities to outpatient clinics to social organizations. While recognizing that a just and inclusive society would reject virtually all segregated institutional arrangements, we argue that in contemporary American society, some people with disabilities may have needs that at this time can best be met by institutional arrangements. We propose ways of reforming institutions to make them less isolating, coercive, and stigmatizing, and to provide forms of social support (...)
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  12. Medical Aspects of the Minimally Conscious State in Children.Stephen Ashwal - 2003 - Brain and Development 25 (8):535-545.
  13. From Cure to Community: Transforming Notions of Autism.Nancy Bagatell - 2010 - Ethos: Journal of the Society for Psychological Anthropology 38 (1):33-55.
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  14. Cognitive Impairment and the Right to Vote: A Strategic Approach.Linda Barclay - 2013 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):146-159.
    Most democratic countries either limit or deny altogether voting rights for people with cognitive impairments or mental health conditions. Against this weight of legal and practical exclusion, disability advocacy and developments in international human rights law increasingly push in the direction of full voting rights for people with cognitive impairments. Particularly influential has been the adoption by the UN of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities in 2007. Article 29 declares that states must ‘ensure that persons with (...)
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  15. The Ethical and Legal Aspects of Palliative Sedation in Severely Brain Injured Patients: A French Perspective.Antoine Baumann, Frederique Claudot, Gerard Audibert, Paul-Michel Mertes & Louis Puybasset - 2011 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 6:4.
    To fulfill their crucial duty of relieving suffering in their patients, physicians may have to administer palliative sedation when they implement treatment-limitation decisions such as the withdrawal of life-supporting interventions in patients with poor prognosis chronic severe brain injury. The issue of palliative sedation deserves particular attention in adults with serious brain injuries and in neonates with severe and irreversible brain lesions, who are unable to express pain or to state their wishes. In France, treatment limitation decisions for these patients (...)
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  16. Under the Floorboards: Examining the Foundations of Mild Cognitive Impairment.Michael Bavidge - 2006 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):75-77.
  17. Mapping Autism and Schizophrenia Onto the Ontogenesis of Social Behaviour: A Hierarchical-Developmental Rather Than Diametrical Perspective.Ralf-Peter Behrendt - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):262-263.
    Co-morbidity of schizophrenia and autism is low because interpersonal concerns of schizophrenic patients presuppose developmental achievements that are absent in autism. Autism may arise if primary anxiety is not overcome at a key developmental stage by affective synchronisation between infant and caregiver. Schizophrenic patients will have learned to regulate primitive anxiety by affectively attuning to narrow social networks but remain highly vulnerable to exclusion from larger groups.
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  18. Rawls and Research on Cognitively Impaired Patients: A Reply to Maio.Derek R. Bell - 2003 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (5):381-393.
    In his paper, “The Relevance of Rawls’ Principle of Justice for Research on Cognitively Impaired Patients” (Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (2002):45–53), Giovanni Maio has developed a thought-provoking argument for the permissibility of non-therapeutic research on cognitively impaired patients. Maio argues that his conclusion follows from the acceptance of John Rawls’s principles of justice, specifically, Rawls’s “liberty principle” Maio has misinterpreted Rawls’s “libertyprinciple” – correctly interpreted it does notsupport non-therapeutic research on cognitivelyimpaired patients. Three other ‘Rawlsian’ arguments are suggested by (...)
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  19. The Bioethics Committee in Long-Term Care Institutions for the Developmentally Disabled.Joseph E. Beltran & D. Min - 1992 - HEC Forum 4 (3):163-173.
  20. Legal and Ethical Complexities of Consent with Cognitively Impaired Research Subjects: Proposed Guidelines.Jessica Wilen Berg - 1996 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 24 (1):18-35.
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  21. Autism and Schizophrenia: Similar Perceptual Consequence, Different Neurobiological Etiology?Armando Bertone, Laurent Mottron & Jocelyn Faubert - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (4):592-593.
    Phillips & Silverstein (P&S, 2003) propose that NMDA-receptor dysfunction may be the fundamental neurobiological mechanism underlying and associating impaired holistic perception and cognitive coordination with schizophrenic psychopathology. We discuss how the P&S hypothesis shares different aspects of the weak central coherence account of autism from both theoretical and experimental perspectives. Specifically, we believe that neither those persons with autism nor those with schizophrenia integrate visuo-perceptual information efficiently, resulting in incongruous internal representations of their external world. However, although NMDA-hypofunction may be (...)
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  22. Developmental Reading Disabilities: The Role of Phonological Processing Has Been Overemphasised.D. V. M. Bishop - 1991 - Mind and Language 6 (2):97-101.
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  23. Who Are the Mentally Handicapped?Paula Boddington & Tessa Podpadec - 1991 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 8 (2):177-190.
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  24. Mild Cognitive Impairment: Where Does It Go From Here?John Bond & Lynne Corner - 2006 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):29-30.
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  25. Ethical Challenges in the Treatment of Individuals With Intellectual Disabilities.Sara E. Boyd & Zachary W. Adams - 2010 - Ethics and Behavior 20 (6):407-418.
  26. Understanding Cognitive Deficits in Alzheimer's Disease Based on Neuroimaging Findings.Meredith N. Braskie & Paul M. Thompson - 2013 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 17 (10):510-516.
  27. Protecting the Vulnerable: Autonomy and Consent in Health Care.Margaret Brazier & Mary Lobjoit (eds.) - 1991 - Routledge.
    Protecting the Vulnerable explores the reality of patient control and choice in health care and analyzes how decisions should be made on behalf of those deemed incapable of making decisions. The contributors, distinguished experts from the disciplines of medicine, ethics, theology, and law, look at the complex problem of autonomy and consent in health care and clinical research today from an illuminating perspective--its impact on the vulnerable members of society. The essays move from the exploration of lingering paternalism in health (...)
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  28. Justice and the Severely Demented Elderly.Dan W. Brock - 1988 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 13 (1):73-99.
    In this paper I address the relation between just claims to health care and severe cognitive impairment from dementia. Two general approaches to justice in allocation of health care are distinguished – prudential allocation and interpersonal distribution. First, I analyze why a patient who has died has no further claims to health care. Second, I show why prudential allocators would not provide for health care treatment should they be in a persistent vegetative state. Third, I argue that the destruction of (...)
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  29. Dysfunctions, Disabilities, and Disordered Minds.Bengt Brülde & Filip Radovic - 2006 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (2):133-141.
  30. Animal Models May Help Fractionate Shared and Discrete Pathways Underpinning Schizophrenia and Autism.Thomas H. J. Burne, Darryl W. Eyles & John J. McGrath - 2008 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 31 (3):264-265.
    Crespi & Badcock (C&B) present an appealing and parsimonious synthesis arguing that schizophrenia and autism are differentially regulated by maternal versus paternal genomic imprinting, respectively. We argue that animal models related to schizophrenia and autism provide a useful platform to explore the mechanisms outlined by C&B. We also note that schizophrenia and autism share certain risk factors such as advanced paternal age. Apart from genomic imprinting, copy number variants related to advanced paternal age may also contribute to the differential trajectory (...)
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  31. How Can We Believe Those Stories? A Nordic Perspective The Ethical Grounds of Competing Truth-Claims.Frank Bylov - 2013 - Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (3):232-240.
    This paper discusses the different, often competing, even conflicting, truth-claims that are heard around the personal narratives of marginalized, stigmatized and culturally muted people?in this case people with intellectual disabilities. Since people with intellectual disabilities began speaking up in the 1980s, tensions have emerged as to whose voice is authentic, whose story can be believed. This matters because we see the consequences of failure to believe those stories in scandals of abuse in settings, such as Winterbourne View (England) in 2011. (...)
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  32. Philosophers of Intellectual Disability: A Taxonomy.Licia Carlson - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):552-566.
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  33. Cognitive Ableism and Disability Studies: Feminist Reflections on the History of Mental Retardation.Licia Carlson - 2001 - Hypatia 16 (4):124-146.
    This paper examines five groups of women that were instrumental in the emergence of the category of "feeblemindedness" in the United States. It analyzes the dynamics of oppression and power relations in the following five groups of women: "feeble-minded" women, institutional caregivers, mothers, researchers, and reformists. Ultimately, I argue that a feminist analysis of the history of mental retardation is necessary to serve as a guide for future feminist work on cognitive disability.
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  34. Introduction: Rethinking Philosophical Presumptions in Light of Cognitive Disability.Licia Carlson & Eva Feder Kittay - 2009 - Metaphilosophy 40 (3-4):307-330.
  35. Whose Choice? Whose Responsibility? Ethical Issues in Prenatal Diagnosis and Learning Disability.Ruth Chadwick - unknown
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  36. "Autistic" Children: New Hope for a Cure By Niko Tinbergen and Elizabeth A. Tinbergen.M. R. A. Chance - 1985 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 28 (4):636-638.
  37. Exploring the Ethical Underpinnings of Self-Advocacy Support for Intellectually Disabled Adults.Rohhss Chapman & Liz Tilley - 2013 - Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (3):257-271.
    Self-advocacy organisations support people in a wide range of political activities, alongside providing key social networks. The emergence of formalised self-advocacy for intellectually disabled people marked an important cultural shift. These groups soon became associated with the pursuit of social change and the attainment of rights. The role of the self-advocacy support worker, working together with self-advocates, has been pivotal. However, studies have shown there has been concern over the relationship between self-advocates and those who advise or support them. Both (...)
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  38. Toward a Sociological Perspective on Learning Disabilities.Carol A. Christensen, Michael M. Gerber & Robert B. Everhart - 1986 - Educational Theory 36 (4):317-331.
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  39. Number Sense and Quantifier Interpretation.Robin Clark & Murray Grossman - 2007 - Topoi 26 (1):51--62.
    We consider connections between number sense—the ability to judge number—and the interpretation of natural language quantifiers. In particular, we present empirical evidence concerning the neuroanatomical underpinnings of number sense and quantifier interpretation. We show, further, that impairment of number sense in patients can result in the impairment of the ability to interpret sentences containing quantifiers. This result demonstrates that number sense supports some aspects of the language faculty.
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  40. Suffering Presence: Theological Reflections on Medicine, the Mentally Handicapped, and the Church.W. W. Clinkenbeard - 1987 - Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (3):165-165.
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  41. Who Knows Best? Awareness of Divided Attention Difficulty in a Neurological Rehabilitation Setting.Josephine Cock, Claire Fordham, Janet Cockburn & Patrick Haggard - 2003 - Brain Injury 17 (7):561-574.
  42. " A Sudden Lift of Wings": Poetry and Prose About Alzheimer's Disease.Fredric L. Coe - 2011 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 54 (1):106-114.
  43. St Lawrence's Staff: Then and Now.Mabel Cooper, Gloria Ferris & Jane Abraham - 2013 - Ethics and Social Welfare 7 (3):272-276.
    Mabel Cooper and Gloria Ferris lived in St Lawrence's Hospital one of the large learning disability institutions which were built round the edges of London. In this paper, Mabel and Gloria share their memories of three nurses at St Lawrence's, supported by Jane Abraham and in this process reveal a number of ethical issues that remain relevant today.
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  44. The Impact of the Label of Mild Cognitive Impairment on the Individual's Sense of Self.Lynne Corner & John Bond - 2006 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 13 (1):3-12.
  45. Mental Handicap -- Partnership in the Community.D. Cunningham - 1987 - Journal of Medical Ethics 13 (3):160-161.
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  46. A Moorean Argument for the Full Moral Status of Those with Profound Intellectual Disability.Benjamin L. Curtis & Simo Vehmas - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (1):41-45.
    This paper is about the moral status of those human beings with profound intellectual disabilities (PIDs). We hold the common sense view that they have equal status to ‘normal’ human beings, and a higher status than any non-human animal. We start with an admission, however: we don’t know how to give a fully satisfying theoretical account of the grounds of moral status that explains this view. And in fact, not only do we not know how to give such an account, (...)
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  47. The Moorean Argument for the Full Moral Status of Those with Profound Intellectual Disability: A Rejoinder to Roberts.Benjamin L. Curtis & Simo Vehmas - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (4):266-267.
    In a recent paper we argued that a Moorean strategy can be employed to justify our continuing to believe the following proposition, even in the presence of philosophical views that entail it is false, without any philosophical argument against those views, and without any positive philosophical argument in its favour: -/- H>A: Humans have an equal moral status that is higher than the moral status of non-human animals. -/- The basic idea is that our confidence in the truth of this (...)
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  48. Moral Worth and Severe Intellectual Disability – A Hybrid View.Benjamin L. Curtis & Simo Vehmas - 2013 - In Jerome E. Bickenbach, Franziska Felder & Barbara Schmitz (eds.), Disability and the Good Human Life. Cambridge University Press. pp. 19-49.
    Consider: You can save either a human or a normal adult dog from a burning building (with no risk to yourself and at little cost), but not both. However, the human is a human with a severe intellectually disability (or, as we shall say, a “SID”). -/- Which one should you save? There is disagreement in the literature about which this issue. Two opposing camps exist, which we call “the intrinsic property camp ” and “the special relations camp.” Those in (...)
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  49. Negotiating Mutuality and Agency in Care-Giving Relationships with Women with Intellectual Disabilities.Pamela Cushing & Tanya Lewis - 2002 - Hypatia 17 (3):173-193.
    : This article is an ethnographic analysis of the mutuality that is possible in relationships between caregivers and women with intellectual disabilities who live together in L'Arche homes. Creating mutuality through which both parties grow and exercise agency requires that caregivers learn to negotiate delicate power relations connected to the physics of care and to reframe dominant stereotypes of disability. This helps them to support the women with intellectual disabilities to name and achieve their desires.
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  50. Romantic Agrarianism and Movement Education in the United States: Examining the Discursive Politics of Learning Disability Science.Scot Danforth - 2011 - Educational Philosophy and Theory 43 (6):636-651.
    The learning disability construct gained scientific and political legitimacy in the United States in the 1960s as an explanation for some forms of childhood learning difficulties. In 1975, federal law incorporated learning disability into the categorical system of special education. The historical and scientific roots of the disorder involved a neuropsychological discourse that often conflated lower social class identity and learning disability. Lower class, often urban, families were viewed as providing insufficient intellectual stimulation for their young children, thereby causing learning (...)
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