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  1. Comics and Genre.Catharine Abell - 2012 - In Aaron Meskin & Roy T. Cook (eds.), The Art of Comics: A Philosophical Approach. Blackwell. pp. 68--84.
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  2. Drawings of Photographs in Comics.Roy T. Cook - 2012 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 70 (1):129-138.
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  3. Do Comics Require Pictures? Or Why Batman #663 Is a Comic.Roy T. Cook - 2011 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 69 (3):285-296.
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  4. Comics & Seriality.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2016 - In Roy T. Cook, Aaron Meskin & Frank Bramlett (eds.), Routledge Companion to Comics. Routledge. pp. 248-256.
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  5. Comics & Collective Authorship.Christy Mag Uidhir - 2012 - In Aaron Meskin & Roy T. Cook (eds.), Art of Comics: A Philosophical Approach. Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 47-67.
    Most mass-art comics (e.g., “superhero” comics) are collectively produced, that is, different people are responsible for different production elements. As such, the more disparate comic production roles we begin to regard as significantly or uniquely contributory, the more difficult questions of comic authorship become, and the more we view various distinct production roles as potentially constitutive is the more we must view comic authorship as potentially collective authorship. Given the general unreliability of intuitions with respect to collective authorship (coupled with (...)
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  6. The Time It Takes.Patrick Maynard - 2001 - In Jan Baetens (ed.), The Graphic Novel. Leuven University Press.
    Concerns photography and time as duration, sequence, equability, past and present (illus.).
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  7. Defining Comics.Aaron Meskin - 2016 - In Aaron Meskin, Frank Bramlett & Roy Cook (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Comics. Routledge. pp. 221-229.
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  8. The Philosophy of Comics.Aaron Meskin - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (12):854-864.
    Comics have been around since the 19th century, but it is only just recently that they have begun to receive philosophical attention as an art form in their own right. This essay begins by exploring the reasons for their comparative neglect by philosophers of art and then provides an overview of extant work on the philosophy of comics. The primary issues discussed are the definition of comics, the ontology of comics, the relationship between comics and other art forms, the relationship (...)
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  9. Comics as Literature?Aaron Meskin - 2009 - British Journal of Aesthetics 49 (3):219-239.
    Not all comics are art. What about the comics that are art? What sort of art are they? In particular, are comics a form of literature? For a variety of reasons it is tempting to think that at least some comics are literature. Nevertheless, many theorists reject the ‘comics as literature’ view. And although some reasons for resisting that view are misguided, I shall argue that there are other good reasons for being hesitant about treating comics as a form of (...)
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  10. Comics and Ethics.Jon Robson - forthcoming - In F. Bramlett, R. Cook & A. Meskin (eds.), Routledge Companion to Comics and Graphic Novels. Routledge.
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  11. In Defense of Comic Pluralism.Nathaniel Sharadin - 2017 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 20 (2):375-392.
    Jokes are sometimes morally objectionable, and sometimes they are not. What’s the relationship between a joke’s being morally objectionable and its being funny? Philosophers’ answers to this question run the gamut. In this paper I present a new argument for the view that the negative moral value of a joke can affect its comedic value both positively and negatively.
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