This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

660 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 660
  1. Cyberspace and the Ecotopian Dream.Ralph Abraham - 2000 - World Futures 55 (2):153-158.
    (2000). Cyberspace and the Ecotopian dream. World Futures: Vol. 55, Challenges of Evolution at the Turn of the Millennium: Part III: The Chllenges of Globalization and Sustainability, pp. 153-158.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Problems of Consciousness: Transactions of the Third Conference.H. A. Abramson (ed.) - 1952 - Josiah Macy Foundation.
  3. Day-Dream and Life.John Adams - 1936 - Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 17 (4):357.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. Governing the World of Wakefulness: The Exploration of Alertness, Performance, and Brain Activity with the Help of “Stay‐Awake‐Men” (1884–1964). [REVIEW]Hannah Ahlheim - 2013 - Anthropology of Consciousness 24 (2):117-136.
    In January 1959, famous radio DJ Peter Tripp stayed awake for 200 hours in a glass booth on Times Square, exposing his weakening body and distracted sleepless mind to the public. Tripp's playing with the borderlines of consciousness was a media attraction, but the DJ also served as a guinea pig for scientific research. From the late 19th century on, several experts had tried to explore the world of wakefulness by observing stay-awake-men. With their help, researchers tested methods of measuring (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  5. A Peep Into the Spiritual Unconscious (a Philosophical Attempt to Explain the Phenomenon of Dreams).M. M. Zuhuruddin[from old catalog] Ahmad - 1936 - [Bombay, India Printing Works.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  6. Sleep and Dream Suppression Following a Lateral Medullary Infarct: A First-Person Account.J. Allan Hobson - 2002 - Consciousness and Cognition 11 (3):377-390.
    Consciousness can be studied only if subjective experience is documented and quantified, yet first-person accounts of the effects of brain injury on conscious experience are as rare as they are potentially useful. This report documents the alterations in waking, sleeping, and dreaming caused by a lateral medullary infarct. Total insomnia and the initial suppression of dreaming was followed by the gradual recovery of both functions. A visual hallucinosis during waking that was associated with the initial period of sleep and dream (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  7. The Nature and Varieties of Felt Presence Experiences: A Reply to Nielsen☆.J. Allancheyne & T. Girard - 2007 - Consciousness and Cognition 16 (4):984-991.
    Nielsen [Nielsen, T. . Felt presence: Paranoid delusion or hallucinatory social imagery? Consciousness and Cognition, 16, 975–983.] raises a number of issues and presents several provocative arguments worthy of discussion regarding the experience of the felt presence during sleep paralysis . We consider these issues beginning with the nature of FP and its relation to affective-motivational systems and provide an alternative to Nielsen’s reduction of FP to a purely spatial hallucination. We then consider implications of the “normal social imagery” model. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  8. From Dream to Discovery.Walter C. Alvarez - 1965 - Perspectives in Biology and Medicine 8 (2):271-273.
  9. Word Associations Contribute to Machine Learning in Automatic Scoring of Degree of Emotional Tones in Dream Reports.Reza Amini, Catherine Sabourin & Joseph de Koninck - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (4):1570-1576.
    Scientific study of dreams requires the most objective methods to reliably analyze dream content. In this context, artificial intelligence should prove useful for an automatic and non subjective scoring technique. Past research has utilized word search and emotional affiliation methods, to model and automatically match human judges’ scoring of dream report’s negative emotional tone. The current study added word associations to improve the model’s accuracy. Word associations were established using words’ frequency of co-occurrence with their defining words as found in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  10. The Stigma of Illegitimacy Resolved, or Life Is an Alimentary Dream.David L. Anderson - 1993 - Diderot Studies 25:11 - 26.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  11. Dreaming: Cortical Activation and Perceptual Thresholds.John Antrobus - 1986 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 7 (2-3).
  12. How Does the Dreaming Brain Explain the Dreaming Mind?John S. Antrobus - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):904-907.
    Recent work on functional brain architecture during dreaming provides invaluable clues for an understanding of dreaming, but identifying active brain regions during dreaming, together with their waking cognitive and cognitive functions, informs a model that accounts for only the grossest characteristics of dreaming. Improved dreaming models require cross discipline apprehension of what it is we want dreaming models to “explain.” [Hobson et al.; Neilsen; Revonsuo; Solms].
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  13. Consciousness, Dreams, and Self: A Transdisciplinary Approach.J. B. Arden - 1996 - Psychosocial Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  14. Dreaming as an Active Construction of Meaning.Rita B. Ardito - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):907-908.
    Although the work of Revonsuo is commendable for its attempt to use an evolutionary approach to formulate a hypothesis about the adaptive function of dreaming, the conclusions arrived at by this author cannot be fully shared. Particularly questionable is the idea that the specific function of dreaming is to simulate threatening events. I propose here a hypothesis in which the dream can have a different function. [Revonsuo].
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  15. Will Students Pass a Competitive Exam That They Failed in Their Dreams?Isabelle Arnulf, Laure Grosliere, Thibault Le Corvec, Jean-Louis Golmard, Olivier Lascols & Alexandre Duguet - 2014 - Consciousness and Cognition 29:36-47.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16. Is Dream Recall Underestimated by Retrospective Measures and Enhanced by Keeping a Logbook? A Review.Denholm J. Aspy, Paul Delfabbro & Michael Proeve - 2015 - Consciousness and Cognition 33:364-374.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  17. The Analogy Between Dreams and the Ancient Art of Memory is Tempting but Superficial.Nikolai Axmacher & Juergen Fell - 2013 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 36 (6):607-608.
  18. Dreams in Child Analysis: Winnicott's Piggle and Dreams as Symptoms in a Lacanian Clinic.Jean-Paul Baldacchino - 2009 - Analysis (Australian Centre for Psychoanalysis) 15:99.
  19. The New Science of Dreaming.D. Barrett & Patrick McNamara (eds.) - 2007 - Praeger Publishers.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  20. An Evolutionary Theory of Dreams and Problem-Solving.Deirdre Barrett - 2007 - In D. Barrett & P. McNamara (eds.), The New Science of Dreaming. Praeger Publishers. pp. 133--154.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. The New Science of Dreaming Vol 3: Cultural and Theoretical Perspectives.Deirdre Barrett & Patrick McNamara (eds.) - 2007 - Praeger Publishers/Greenwood Publishing Group.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22. Dreams as a Meta-Conceptual or Existential Experience.Jeremy Barris - 2014 - Philosophia 42 (3):625-644.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  23. RIVERS, W. H. R. -Conflict and Dream. [REVIEW]F. C. Bartlett - 1924 - Mind 33:94.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Sleep.Imants Baruss - 2003 - In Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association. pp. 51-78.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists.Imants Baruss - 2003 - American Psychological Association.
  26. Dreams.Imants Baruss - 2003 - In Alterations of Consciousness: An Empirical Analysis for Social Scientists. American Psychological Association. pp. 79-106.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Disturbances of Consciousness and Sleep-Wake Functions.Claudio Bassetti - 2001 - In Julien Bogousslavsky & Louis R. Caplan (eds.), Stroke Syndromes. Cambridge University Press. pp. 192-210.
  28. Are There Levels of Consciousness?Tim Bayne, Jakob Hohwy & Adrian M. Owen - 2016 - Trends in Cognitive Sciences 20 (6):405-413.
    The notion of a level of consciousness is a key construct in the science of consciousness. Not only is the term employed to describe the global states of consciousness that are associated with post-comatose disorders, epileptic absence seizures, anaesthesia, and sleep, it plays an increasingly influential role in theoretical and methodological contexts. However, it is far from clear what precisely a level of consciousness is supposed to be. This paper argues that the levels-based framework for conceptualizing global states of consciousness (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29. Dreaming, by Norman Malcolm. (London: Routledge and Kegan Paul. 1959. Pp. 128. Price 12s. 6d.).Errol Bedford - 1961 - Philosophy 36 (138):377-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Awareness: Biorhythms, Sleep and Dreaming.E. Bentley - 2000 - Routledge.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Sleep and Waking and Two Populations of Neurons.G. Berlucchi - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):486.
  32. Published in Skeptical Inquirer 1991, 15, 362-370.Susan Blackmore - unknown
    What could it mean to be conscious in your dreams? For most of us, dreaming is something quite separate from normal life. When we wake up from being chased by a ferocious tiger, or seduced by a devastatingly good-looking Nobel Prize winner we realize with relief or disappointment that "it was only a dream.".
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Lucid Dreaming: Awake in Your Sleep?Susan J. Blackmore - 1991 - Skeptical Inquirer 15:362-370.
    What could it mean to be conscious in your dreams? For most of us, dreaming is something quite separate from normal life. When we wake up from being chased by a ferocious tiger, or seduced by a devastatingly good-looking Nobel Prize winner we realize with relief or disappointment that "it was only a dream.".
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. The Ability to Self-Tickle Following Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Dreaming.M. Blagrove, S. Blakemore & B. Thayer - 2006 - Consciousness and Cognition 15 (2):285-294.
    Self-produced tactile stimulation usually feels less tickly—is perceptually attenuated—relative to the same stimulation produced externally. This is not true, however, for individuals with schizophrenia. Here, we investigate whether the lack of attenuation to self-produced stimuli seen in schizophrenia also occurs for normal participants following REM dreams. Fourteen participants were stimulated on their left palm with a tactile stimulation device which allowed the same stimulus to be generated by the participant or by the experimenter. The level of self-tickling attenuation did not (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  35. Dreams Have Meaning but No Function.Mark Blagrove - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):910-911.
    Solms shows the cortical basis for why dreams reflect waking concerns and goals, but with deficient volition. I argue the latter relates to Hobson et al.'s process I as well as M. A memory function for REM sleep is possible, but may be irrelevant to dream characteristics, which, contrary to Revonsuo, mirror the range of waking emotions, positive and negative. [Hobson et al.; Nielsen; Solms; Revonsuo; Vertes & Eastman].
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  36. Problems with the Cognitive Psychological Modeling of Dreaming.Mark Blagrove - 1996 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 17 (2):99-134.
    It is frequently assumed that dreaming can be likened to such waking cognitive activities as imagination, analogical reasoning, and creativity, and that these models can then be used to explain instances of problem solving during dreams. This paper emphasizes instead the lack of reflexivity and intentionality within dreams, which undermines their characterization as analogs of the waking world, and opposes claims that dreams can complement and aid waking world problem solving. The importance of reflexivity in imagination, in analogical reasoning and (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  37. A Replication of the 5–7day Dream-Lag Effect with Comparison of Dreams to Future Events as Control for Baseline Matching. [REVIEW]Mark Blagrove, Josie Henley-Einion, Amanda Barnett, Darren Edwards & C. Heidi Seage - 2011 - Consciousness and Cognition 20 (2):384-391.
    The dream-lag effect refers to there being, after the frequent incorporation of memory elements from the previous day into dreams , a lower incorporation of memory elements from 2 to 4 days before the dream, but then an increased incorporation of memory elements from 5 to 7 days before the dream. Participants kept a daily diary and a dream diary for 14 days and then rated the level of matching between every dream report and every daily diary record. Baseline matching (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  38. Stroke Syndromes.Julien Bogousslavsky & Louis R. Caplan (eds.) - 2001 - Cambridge University Press.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  39. The Perception of Sleep Onset in Normals and Insomniacs.M. H. Bonnet - 1990 - In R. Bootsen, John F. Kihlstrom & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.), Sleep and Cognition. American Psychological Association Press. pp. 148--159.
  40. Biography—A Dream?Brigitte Boothe - 2005 - In Jürgen Straub (ed.), Narration, Identity, and Historical Consciousness. Berghan Books. pp. 3--211.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Sleep and Cognition.R. Bootsen, John F. Kihlstrom & Daniel L. Schacter (eds.) - 1990 - American Psychological Association Press.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  42. Sleep Homeostasis.Alexander A. Borbély - 1986 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 9 (3):401.
  43. Active Wakefulness and Paradoxical Sleep: Common Mechanisms?Alexander A. Borbély - 1978 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 1 (3):487.
  44. Sleep, Not Rem Sleep, is the Royal Road to Dreams.Alexander A. Borbély & Lutz Wittmann - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):911-912.
    The advent of functional imaging has reinforced the attempts to define dreaming as a sleep state-dependent phenomenon. PET scans revealed major differences between nonREM sleep and REM sleep. However, because dreaming occurs throughout sleep, the common features of the two sleep states, rather than the differences, could help define the prerequisite for the occurrence of dreams. [Hobson et al.; Nielsen; Solms; Revonsuo; Vertes & Eastman].
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Rem Sleep Deprivation: The Wrong Paradigm Leading to Wrong Conclusions.Jan Born & Steffen Gais - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):912-913.
    There are obvious flaws in REM sleep suppression paradigms that do not allow any conclusion to be drawn either pro or contra the REM sleep-memory hypothesis. However, less intrusive investigations of REM sleep suggest that this sleep stage or its adjunct neuroendocrine characteristics exert a facilitating influence on certain aspects of ongoing memory formation during sleep. [Nielsen; Vertes & Eastman].
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Mind and Consciousness During Sleep.M. Bosinelli - 1995 - Behavioural Brain Research 69:195-201.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  47. Rem and NRem Mentation: Nielsen's Model Once Again Supports the Supremacy of Rem.M. Bosinelli & P. C. Cicogna - 2000 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 23 (6):913-914.
    Nielsen's model presents a new isomorphic brain-mind viewpoint, according to which the sole dream generator is found in a REM-on (explicit or covert REM) mechanism. Such a model cannot explain the dreamlike activity during SWS (slow wave sleep), SO (sleep onset) and in the last period of sleep. Moreover the hypothesis contrasts with Solms's data, which show that dreaming is present also in case of destruction of the REM generator. [Nielsen; Solms].
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  48. The Dream of a Philosophical Poetics (the Dreams of Descartes).G. Boss - 1993 - Dialectica 47 (2-3):199-216.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  49. The Dream in the Light of a New Conception of Consciousness.John Bostock - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 5 (1):36 – 48.
  50. The Dream in the Light of a New Conception of Consciousness.John Bostock - 1927 - Australasian Journal of Psychology and Philosophy 5 (1):36-48.
1 — 50 / 660