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  1. 'Minding Our Business': What the US has Done and Can Do to Ensure That its Multinationals Act Responsibility in Foreign Markets.Susan Ariel Aaronson - unknown
    This article examines the signals that US public policy sends to global market actors regarding their social and environmental practices. The United States Government does not mandate that US based firms follow US social and environmental law in foreign markets. However, because many developing countries do not have strong human rights, labor, and environmental laws, many multinationals have adopted voluntary corporate responsibility initiatives to self-regulate their overseas social and environmental practices. This article argues that voluntary actions, while important, are insufficient (...)
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  2. Multinationals’ Responsibility in the Developing World.Eric Palmer - forthcoming - In Robert W. Kolb (ed.), The SAGE Encyclopedia of Business Ethics and Society: 2nd edition. Sage Publications.
    This entry provides an overview of business responsibilities with regard to international development and human and social development in less developed nations. Areas of ethical concern have grown in variety and complexity as understanding of development has changed from such narrow economic treatment in the era following World War II to the present. This entry traces that growth and considers responsibilities of multinational business engaging directly with and subcontracting in the developing world, most notably in telecommunications, the extractive industries of (...)
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  3. Working Together: Critical Perspectives on Six Cross-Sector Partnerships in Southern Africa. [REVIEW]Melanie Rein & Leda Stott - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 90 (1):79 - 89.
    This paper examines six cross-sector partnerships in South Africa and Zambia. These partnerships were part of a research study undertaken between 2003 and 2005 and were selected because of their potential to contribute to poverty reduction in their respective countries. This paper examines the context in which the partnerships were established, their governance and accountability mechanisms and the engagement and participation of the partners and the intended beneficiaries in the partnerships. We argue that a partnership approach which has proven successful (...)
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Business Ethics and Non-Governmental Organizations
  1. The Moral Legitimacy of NGOs as Partners of Corporations.Dorothea Baur & Guido Palazzo - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (4):579-604.
    Partnerships between companies and NGOs have received considerable at­tention in CSR in the past years. However, the role of NGO legitimacy in such partnerships has thus far been neglected. We argue that NGOs assume a status as special stakeholders of corporations which act on behalf of the common good. This role requires a particular focus on their moral legitimacy. We introduce a conceptual framework for analysing the moral legitimacy of NGOs along three dimensions, building on the theory of deliberative democracy. (...)
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  2. Corporations and NGOs: When Accountability Leads to Co-Optation. [REVIEW]Dorothea Baur & Hans Peter Schmitz - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (1):9-21.
    Interactions between corporations and nonprofits are on the rise, frequently driven by a corporate interest in establishing credentials for corporate social responsibility (CSR). In this article, we show how increasing demands for accountability directed at both businesses and NGOs can have the unintended effect of compromising the autonomy of nonprofits and fostering their co-optation. Greater scrutiny of NGO spending driven by self-appointed watchdogs of the nonprofit sector and a prevalence of strategic notions of CSR advanced by corporate actors weaken the (...)
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  3. Non-Governmental Organizations, Shareholder Activism, and Socially Responsible Investments: Ethical, Strategic, and Governance Implications. [REVIEW]Terrence Guay, Jonathan P. Doh & Graham Sinclair - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 52 (1):125-139.
    In this article, we document the growing influence of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in the realm of socially responsible investing (SRI). Drawing from ethical and economic perspectives on stakeholder management and agency theory, we develop a framework to understand how and when NGOs will be most influential in shaping the ethical and social responsibility orientations of business using the emergence of SRI as the primary influencing vehicle. We find that NGOs have opportunities to influence corporate conduct via direct, indirect, and interactive (...)
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  4. Corporate Relations with Environmental Organizations Represented by Hyperlinks on the Fortune Global 500 Companies' Websites.Daejoong Kim & Yoonjae Nam - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):475-487.
    This study investigates corporate relationships with environmental organizations by examining hyperlinks in the corporate environmental responsibility (CER) sections of the Fortune 2008 Global 500 corporate websites. It is assumed that hyperlinked organizations either represent their current inter-organizational relationship or create symbolic relationships among organizations. Results show that Asian companies have fewer hyperlink relations with other organizations compared with those in North America and Western Europe. Network analysis also confirms that U.S. companies are explicitly connected with stakeholders for CER practices, and (...)
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  5. An Empirical Evaluation of Job Satisfaction in Private Sector and Public Sector Bank Employees.Prof Madhurima - 2014 - SOCRATES 1 (March 2014):89-103.
    Job satisfaction cannot be defined by a single measurement alone. In fact, there is substantial evidence to support a relationship between satisfaction and performance of a job. For such a relationship there has been tremendous interest among managers and economists as it helps in increasing the quality as well as quantity of the production. However, some argue contrarily, that rather it is the performance that leads to satisfaction. Whatever be the direction of relationship, one thing is clear that productivity and (...)
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  6. Societal Ethos and Economic Development Organizations in Nicaragua.Josep F. Mària & Daniel Arenas - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (2):231 - 244.
    This article analyzes efforts in Nicaragua to create ethical organizations and an ethical economy. Three societal ethea found in contemporary Nicaragua are examined: the ethos of revolution, the ethos of corruption, and the ethos of human development. The emerging ethos of human development provides the most hope for the nation's social and economic evolution. The practices of three successful economic development organizations explicitly aligned with the ethos of human development are described and evaluated: (1) a microfinance foundation (FDL), (2) a (...)
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  7. FACTORS INFLUENCING E-CRM IN AIRLINES IN J& K.Jyoti Sharma - 2014 - SOCRATES 1 (March 2014):134-145.
    Today every organization is acting in a dynamic environment and in a world characterised by turbulent change and fierce competition due to technological advancement and the knowledge based economy, an organization must always ready to adapt and transform themselves so as to be able to confront the shifting needs of the new environment, more demanding customers, smarter workers, anticipating ability to changes, accelerating the development of new products, processes and services, changing technologies and customer expectations, businesses have realised the importance (...)
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  8. Discovering the Role of the Firm: The Separation Criterion and Corporate Law.Daniel F. Spulber - unknown
    Professor Daniel F. Spulber presents a theory of the firm based on the ability to separate the objectives of the firm from those of its owners. He introduces a separation criterion which defines a firm as a transaction institution such that the consumption objectives of the institution's owners can be separated from the objectives of the institution itself. The separation criterion provides a bright line distinction between firms and other types of transaction institutions. Firms under this criterion include profit-maximizing sole (...)
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Business Ethics and Public Policy
  1. “Minding Our Business”: What the United States Government has Done and Can Do to Ensure That U.S. Multinationals Act Responsibly in Foreign Markets. [REVIEW]Susan Ariel Aaronson - 2005 - Journal of Business Ethics 59 (1-2):175 - 198.
    The United States Government does not mandate that US based firms follow US social and environmental law in foreign markets. However, because many developing countries do not have strong human rights, labor, and environmental laws, many multinationals have adopted voluntary corporate responsibility initiatives to self-regulate their overseas social and environmental practices. This article argues that voluntary actions, while important, are insufficient to address the magnitude of problems companies confront as they operate in developing countries where governance is often inadequate. The (...)
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  2. Building Peace in Fragile States — Building Trust is Essential for Effective Public-Private Partnerships.Igor Abramov - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 89 (4):481 - 494.
    Increasingly, the private sector is playing a greater role in supporting peace building efforts in conflict and post-conflict areas by providing critical expertise, know-how, and capital. However, reports of the corrupt practices of both governments and businesses have plagued international peace building efforts, deepening the distrust of stricken communities. Businesses are perceived as being selfish and indifferent to the impact their operations may have on the social and political development of local communities. Additionally, the corruption of local governments has been (...)
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  3. Economic Policy and World Organization.Asaf Bar-Tura - 2011 - Perspectives on Global Development and Technology 10 (1):194-212.
    The global economic crisis and the responses to it have brought to the fore questions of sovereignty and cosmopolitanism. In a world so interlinked, what is the proper way to order the global arena, politically and economically? This essay examines Habermas’ multilayered approach to world organization, as well as Pogge and others. Focusing on the question of trade policies, I argue (contra Habermas) for robust global economic governance policies, but (contra Pogge) that these policies should uphold fair trade instead of (...)
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  4. Water Conservation & the National Water Policy (2012).Saurabh Chandra - 2013 - SOCRATES 1 (1):58-79.
    Earth and every living organism on this planet require water for survival and without water there would be no life. Drinking water should be clean that means it should be free from micro-organisms, free from harmful chemical and other pollutants. Consuming unsafe drinking water may lead to several water borne diseases, and other long term and chronic health problems. Water conservation encompasses the policies, strategies and activities to manage fresh water as a sustainable resource to protect the water environment and (...)
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  5. The Impact of Police-Monitored CCTV Cameras on Crime Patterns: A Quasi-Experimental Study in the Metropolitan City of Bursa, Turkey.Darcan Emirhan - 2012 - Dissertation, Rutgers The School of Criminal Justice
    Rapid adoption and expansion of the CCTV systems in Turkey as well as all over the world have produced a fair amount of ―technological determinism‖ among many law enforcement officials, which Norris and Armstrong (1999, p. 9) define as ―an unquestioning belief in the power of technology‖. As a matter of technological determinism, politicians and the public continue to myopically expect that the exclusive responsibility of preventing crime rest on the police-monitored CCTV cameras. Conversely, policy makers may be better informed (...)
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  6. Conceptualising Corporate Social Responsibility: 'Relational Governance' Assessed, Augmented, and Adapted. [REVIEW]Jenny Fairbrass & Anna Zueva-Owens - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (3):321-335.
    Academic interest in corporate social responsibility (CSR) can be traced back to the 1930s. Since then an impressive body of empirical data and theory-building has been amassed, mainly located in the fields of management studies and business ethics. One of the most noteworthy recent conceptual contributions to the scholarship is Midttun’s (Corporate Governance 5(3):159–174, 2005 ) CSR-oriented embedded relational model of societal governance. It re-conceptualises the relationships between the state, business, and civil society. Other scholars (In Albareda et al. Corporate (...)
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  7. The Moral Authority of Transnational Corporate Codes.William C. Frederick - 1991 - Journal of Business Ethics 10 (3):165 - 177.
    Ethical guidelines for multinational corporations are included in several international accords adopted during the past four decades. These guidelines attempt to influence the practices of multinational enterprises in such areas as employment relations, consumer protection, environmental pollution, political participation, and basic human rights. Their moral authority rests upon the competing principles of national sovereignty, social equity, market integrity, and human rights. Both deontological principles and experience-based value systems undergird and justify the primacy of human rights as the fundamental moral authority (...)
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  8. Accountability in Crisis: The Sponsorship Scandal and the Office of the Comptroller General in Canada.Clinton Free & Vaughan Radcliffe - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 84 (2):189-208.
    For much of the last 50 years, a key platform animating public sector reform in Canada and elsewhere has been that efficiency and effectiveness can be achieved by adapting private sector financial management methods and practices. We argue that the recent re-establishment of the Office of the Comptroller General (OCG) of Canada represents a key element of a program of strengthening financial accountability that has emerged within the Canadian Federal Government. Although this program is longstanding and is associated Canada’s implementation (...)
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  9. Contesting the Market: An Assessment of Capitalism's Threat to Democracy.Michael Fuerstein - 2015 - In Subramanian Rangan (ed.), Performance and Progress: Essays on Capitalism, Business, and Society. Oxford University Press.
    I argue that capitalism presents a threat to “democratic contestation”: the egalitarian, socially distributed capacity to affect how, why, and whether power is used. Markets are not susceptible to mechanisms of accountability, nor are they bearers of intentions in the way that political power-holders are. This makes them resistant to the kind of rational, intentional oversight that constitutes one of democracy’s social virtues. I identify four social costs associated with this problem: the vulnerability of citizens to arbitrary interference, the insensitivity (...)
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  10. Located Subjects: The Daily Lives of Policy Workers.Zoe Gill - 2012 - In Angelique Bletsas & Chris Beasley (eds.), Engaging with Carol Bacchi: Strategic Interventions and Exchanges. University of Adelaide Press.
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  11. Women, Policy and Politics: Recasting Policy Studies.Susan Goodwin - 2012 - In Angelique Bletsas & Chris Beasley (eds.), Engaging with Carol Bacchi: Strategic Interventions and Exchanges. University of Adelaide Press.
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  12. Where Did Mill Go Wrong? Why the Capital-Managed Rather Than the Labor-Managed Enterprise is the Predominant.Schwartz Justin - 2012 - Ohio State Law Journal 73:220-85.
    In this Article, I propose a novel law and economics explanation of a deeply puzzling aspect of business organization in market economies. Why are virtually all firms organized as capital-managed and -owned (capitalist) enterprises rather than as labor-managed and -owned cooperatives? Over 150 years ago, J.S. Mill predicted that efficiency and other advantages would eventually make worker cooperatives predominant over capitalist firms. Mill was right about the advantages but wrong about the results. The standard explanation is that capitalist enterprise is (...)
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  13. The State of the Planet: A Report.Alexander King (ed.) - 1980 - Pergamon Press.
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  14. Iniciativas e incidencia de las políticas socialmente responsables en la promoción de la salud y seguridad en el trabajo.Lina Marrugo-Salas & Iván Vargas-Chaves - 2014 - In Vestigium Ire 7:13-22.
    La prevención de riesgos laborales y la responsabilidad social empresarial son disciplinas que están directamente relacionadas, ya que dentro de sus objetivos se encuentra garantizar el bienestar, la seguridad y salud de los trabajadores en calidad de grupo de interés prioritario. En este sentido, el propósito del presente texto yace en demostrar el papel que tiene la gestión de los riesgos asociados al trabajo en la implementación de estrategias de responsabilidad social en las organizaciones, analizando las iniciativas más reconocidas que (...)
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  15. Order Ethics, Economics, and Game Theory.Nikil Mukerji & Christoph Schumacher - 2016 - In Christoph Luetge & Nikil Mukerji (eds.), Order Ethics: An Ethical Framework for the Social Market Economy. Springer. pp. 93-108.
    We offer a concise introduction to the methodology of order-ethics and highlight how it connects aspects of economic theory and, in particular, game theory with traditional ethical considerations. The discussion is conducted along the lines of five basic propositions, which are used to characterize the methodological approach of order ethics.
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  16. Legitimate Social Demands on Corporations.Eric Palmer - 2006 - Proceedings of the International Association for Business and Society 17:151-154.
    The classic formulation of doubt regarding the appropriateness of Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR), as voiced by Milton Friedman, is that “…there is one and only one social responsibility of business – to use its resources and engage in activities to increase its profits so long as it stays within the rules of the game…” I present a reply to Friedman, and to others, that accepts their implicit premise – that business, including globalizing business activity, can be a virtuous mechanism of (...)
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  17. El coste del Estado autonómico II: Administración autonómica y local.Miguel Angel Quintana Paz (ed.) - 2012 - Madrid: Fundación Progreso y Democracia.
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  18. Propuestas de política económica.Miguel Angel Quintana Paz (ed.) - 2011 - Madrid: Fundación Progreso y Democracia.
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  19. Crisis y cambio de modelo económico.Miguel Angel Quintana Paz (ed.) - 2010 - Madrid: Fundación Progreso y Democracia.
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  20. Global Food, Global Justice: Essays on Eating Under Globalization.Mary C. Rawlinson & Caleb Ward (eds.) - 2015 - Cambridge Scholars Press.
    As Brillant-Savarin remarked in 1825 in his classic text Physiologie du Goût, “Tell me what you eat, and I will tell you who you are.” Philosophers and political theorists have only recently begun to pay attention to food as a critical domain of human activity and social justice. Too often these discussions treat food as a commodity and eating as a matter of individual choice. Policies that address the global obesity crisis by focusing on individual responsibility and medical interventions ignore (...)
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  21. Punishing Corporations: A Proposal.David T. Risser - 1989 - Business and Professional Ethics Journal 8 (3):83-92.
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  22. A Political Account of Corporate Moral Responsibility.Jeffery Smith - 2011 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 14 (2):223 - 246.
    Should we conceive of corporations as entities to which moral responsibility can be attributed? This contribution presents what we will call a political account of corporate moral responsibility. We argue that in modern, liberal democratic societies, there is an underlying political need to attribute greater levels of moral responsibility to corporations. Corporate moral responsibility is essential to the maintenance of social coordination that both advances social welfare and protects citizens' moral entitlements. This political account posits a special capacity of self-governance (...)
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  23. Discovering the Role of the Firm: The Separation Criterion and Corporate Law.Daniel F. Spulber - unknown
    Professor Daniel F. Spulber presents a theory of the firm based on the ability to separate the objectives of the firm from those of its owners. He introduces a separation criterion which defines a firm as a transaction institution such that the consumption objectives of the institution's owners can be separated from the objectives of the institution itself. The separation criterion provides a bright line distinction between firms and other types of transaction institutions. Firms under this criterion include profit-maximizing sole (...)
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  24. Pharmaceuticals.Margit Sutrop & Kadri Simm - 2011 - In Ruth Chadwick, Henk ten Have & E. M. Meslin (eds.), SAGE Handbook of Healthcare Ethics. Sage Publications. pp. 427-439.
    This paper is concerned with analyzing transformations in the development, marketing, prescription, and access issues of pharmaceuticals, paying special attention to a variety of ethical and social aspects. A major focus of the article is on pharmacogenetics – a rapidly developing discipline which in the near future might well have a major effect on both drug development and clinical medicine.
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  25. Childhood Obesity: Ethical and Policy Issues.Kristin Voigt, Stuart G. Nicholls & Garrath Williams - 2014 - Oxford University Press.
    Childhood obesity has become a central concern in many countries and a range of policies have been implemented or proposed to address it. This co-authored book is the first to focus on the ethical and policy questions raised by childhood obesity and its prevention. -/- Throughout the book, the authors emphasize that childhood obesity is a multi-faceted phenomenon, and just one of many issues that parents, schools and societies face. They argue that it is important to acknowledge the resulting complexities (...)
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  26. Avoiding Policy Failure.Steven E. Wallis - 2011 - Emergent Publications.
    Why do policies fail? How can we objectively choose the best policy from two (or more) competing alternatives? How can we create better policies? To answer these critical questions this book presents an innovative yet workable approach. Avoiding Policy Failure uses emerging metapolicy methodologies in case studies that compare successful policies with ones that have failed. Those studies investigate the systemic nature of each policy text to gain new insights into why policies fail. -/- In addition to providing intriguing directions (...)
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  27. Ethics and Public Policy.Dita Wickins-Drazilova & Garrath Williams - 2010 - In Luis Moreno, Iris Pigeot & Wolfgang Ahrens (eds.), Epidemiology of Obesity in Children and Adolescents. Springer Science+Business Media. pp. 7--20.
    Ethical reflections help us decide what are the best actions to pursue in difficult and controversial situations. Reflections on public policy consider how to alter patterns of individual activity and institutional policies or frameworks for the better. The rising prevalence of childhood and adolescent obesity may pose serious health issues. As such, it is related to ethical and public policy questions including responsibility for health, food production and consumption, patterns of physical activity, the role of the state, and the rights (...)
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Business Ethics and Religion
  1. Profit and More: Catholic Social Teaching and the Purpose of the Firm. [REVIEW]Andrew V. Abela - 2001 - Journal of Business Ethics 31 (2):107 - 116.
    The empirical findings in Collins and Porras'' study of visionary companies, Built to Last, and the normative claims about the purpose of the business firm in Centesimus Annus are found to be complementary in understanding the purpose of the business firm. A summary of the methodology and findings of Built to Lastand a short overview of Catholic Social Teaching are provided. It is shown that Centesimus Annus'' claim that the purpose of the firm is broader than just profit is consistent (...)
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  2. Confucius, Cars, and Big Government: Impact of Government Involvement in Business on Consumer Perceptions Under Confucianism.David Ackerman, Jing Hu & Liyuan Wei - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 88 (S3):473-482.
    Building on prior research in Confucianism and business, the current study examines the effects of Confucianism on consumer trust of government involvement with products and company brands. Based on three major ideas of Confucianism – meritocracy, loyalty to superior, and separation of responsibilities – it is expected that consumers under the influence of Confucianism would perceive products from government-involved enterprises to have more desirable attributes and show preference for their company brands. Findings from an empirical study in the Chinese automobile (...)
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  3. The Italian Economia Aziendale and Catholic Social Teaching: How to Apply the Common Good Principle at the Managerial Level. [REVIEW]Ericka Costa & Tommaso Ramus - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 106 (1):103-116.
    The ongoing global economic and financial crisis has exposed the risks of considering market and business organizations only as instruments for creating economic wealth while paying little heed to their role in ethics and values. Catholic Social Teaching (CST) could provide a useful contribution in rethinking the role of values in business organizations and markets because CST puts forward an anthropological view that involves thinking of the marketplace as a community of persons with the aim of participating in the Common (...)
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  4. Managerial Abilities: Evidence From Religious Mutual Fund Managers. [REVIEW]Luis Ferruz, Fernando Muñoz & María Vargas - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (4):503-517.
    In this study, we analyze the financial performance and the managerial abilities of religious mutual fund managers, implementing a comparative analysis with conventional mutual funds. We use a broad sample, free of survivorship bias, of religious equity mutual funds from the US market, for the period from January 1994 to September 2010. We build a matched-pair conventional sample in order to compare the results obtained for both kinds of mutual fund managers. We analyze stock-picking and market timing abilities, topics widely (...)
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  5. Individualist Economic Values and Self-Interest: The Problem in the Puritan Ethic. [REVIEW]Donald E. Frey - 1998 - Journal of Business Ethics 17 (14):1573-1580.
    The Puritan ethic is conventionally interpreted as a set of individualistic values that encourage a degree of self-interest inimical to the good of organizations and society. A closer reading of original Puritan moralists reveals a different ethic. Puritan moralists simultaneously legitimated economic individualism while urging individuals to work for the common good. They contrasted self-interest and the common good, which they understood to be the sinful and moral ends, respectively, of economic individualism. This polarity can be found in all the (...)
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  6. Ethical Behavior in Business: A Hierarchical Approach From the Talmud. [REVIEW]Hershey H. Friedman - 1985 - Journal of Business Ethics 4 (2):117 - 129.
    The Talmud, the compilation of Jewish oral law, is over 1500 years old and includes extensive discussions of business ethics. This paper presents four levels of ethical behavior in business gleaned from the words of the Talmud. At the lowest level, an individual is just barely inside the law; the highest level is the way of the pious. The author has attempted to relate the ethics in ancient business situations to business practices today.
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  7. Spirituality, Inc.Stewart W. Herman - 2011 - Business Ethics Quarterly 21 (3):533-537.
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  8. Consciousness at Work: A Review of Some Important Values, Discussed From a Buddhist Perspective. [REVIEW]Joan Marques - 2012 - Journal of Business Ethics 105 (1):27-40.
    This article reviews the element of consciousness from a Buddhist and a non-Buddhist (Western) perspective. Within the Buddhist perspective, two practices toward attaining expanded and purified consciousness will be included: the Seven-Point Mind Training and Vipassana. Within the Western perspective, David Hawkins’ works on consciousness will be used as a main guide. In addition, a number of important concepts that contribute to expanded and purified consciousness will be presented. Among these concepts are impermanence, karma, non-harming (ahimsa), ethics, kindness and compassion, (...)
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  9. Religion, Ethics and Stock Trading: The Case of an Islamic Equities Market. [REVIEW]Shahnaz Naughton & Tony Naughton - 2000 - Journal of Business Ethics 23 (2):145 - 159.
    Islamic banking, based on the prohibition of interest, is well established throughout the Muslim world. Attention has now turned towards applying Islamic principles in equity markets. The search for alternatives to Western style markets has been given added impetus in Muslim countries by the turmoil in Asian financial markets in 1997. Common stocks are a legitimate form of instrument in Islam, but many of the practices associated with stock trading are not. In this paper the instruments traded and the structure (...)
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Business Ethics and Societal Culture
  1. Using Best–Worst Scaling Methodology to Investigate Consumer Ethical Beliefs Across Countries.Pat Auger, Timothy M. Devinney & Jordan J. Louviere - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 70 (3):299-326.
    This study uses best–worst scaling experiments to examine differences across six countries in the attitudes of consumers towards social and ethical issues that included both product related issues (such as recycled packaging) and general social factors (such as human rights). The experiments were conducted using over 600 respondents from Germany, Spain, Turkey, USA, India, and Korea. The results show that there is indeed some variation in the attitudes towards social and ethical issues across these six countries. However, what is more (...)
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  2. Comparing Ethical Ideologies Across Cultures.Catherine N. Axinn, M. Elizabeth Blair, Alla Heorhiadi & Sharon V. Thach - 2004 - Journal of Business Ethics 54 (2):103 - 119.
    Using measures developed by Singhapakdi et al. (1996, Journal of Business ethics 15, 1131–1140) the perceived importance of ethics and social responsibility (PRESOR) is measured among MBA students in the United States, Malaysia and Ukraine revealing a stockholder view and two stakeholder views. Relativism and Idealism are also measured. The scores of MBA students are compared among each other and with those of the U.S. managers who were part of the original study. Managers'' scores tend to be significantly higher on (...)
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  3. A History of Scandinavian Socially Responsible Investing.Elias Bengtsson - 2008 - Journal of Business Ethics 82 (4):969-983.
    This article contributes to the literature on national varieties of socially responsible investment (SRI) by demonstrating how Scandinavian SRI developed from the 60s and onwards. Combining findings on Scandinavian SRI with insights from previous research and institutional theory, the article accounts for the role of changes in societal values and norms, the mechanisms by which SRI practices spread, and how investors adopt and transform practices to suit their surrounding institutional contexts. Especially, the article draws attention to how different categories of (...)
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