This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:

207 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 207
Material to categorize
  1. The Philosophical Machine: Vertov, Deleuze and Guattari on the Interchanging Movement From Art to Philosophy.Susana Viegas - 2019 - Revista Portuguesa de Filosofia 75 (4):2375-2392.
    What is Philosophy?, the third volume of the series of books that Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari wrote on “Capitalism and Schizophrenia”, presents us with a rather unusual idea, but one that is essential to understanding contemporary philosophical thought: the notion that philosophy is a concept-creating machine that must be connected to other machines, such as the arts and the sciences. Philosophy, science, and art are three distinct forms of reliable thinking. Given the heterogeneity of thinking, in what sense can (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Why So Serious: On Philosophy and Comedy.Russell Ford (ed.) - 2018 - New York, NY, USA: Routledge.
    The Western philosophical tradition has shown a marked and perennial fondness for tragedy. From Plato and Aristotle, through the development of Christianity, to German idealism, and even to contemporary reflections on the murderous violence of the twentieth century, philosophy has repeatedly looked to tragedy for resources to make suffering, grief, and death thinkable. But what if by showing such a preference for tragedy, philosophical thought has unwittingly and unknowingly aligned itself with a form of thinking that accepts human suffering and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Uccello's Fluttering Monument to Hawkwood, with Schwob and Artaud.Javier Berzal de Dios - 2016 - Diacritics 44 (2):86-103.
    At the twilight of the nineteenth century, the French symbolist writer Marcel Schwob assimilated Paolo Uccello (1397-1475) into modern sensibilities: “For Uccello did not care about the reality of things, but about their multiplicity and about the infinitude of lines.” Schwob’s consideration of Uccello (much like Antonin Artaud’s, who wrote the surrealist “Uccello le poil”) has been traditionally neglected by art historians. And yet, these literary encounters with the painter retain a sense of hermeneutical validity that, I argue, transcends the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Autonome Teilhaftigkeit und teilhaftige Autonomie. Der Andere in Michail M. Bachtins Frühwerk.Carina Pape - 2015 - München, Deutschland: Wilhelm Fink.
    Michail M. Bachtin, der durch die Entwicklung der literaturwissenschaftlichen Paradigmen der Dialogizität und Polyphonie Berühmtheit erlangte, wurde noch nicht ausreichend als Vertreter der ihrerseits vernachlässigten russischen Philosophie wahrgenommen. -/- Bereits in den philosophischen Fragmenten des Frühwerks bilden Dialog und Vielfalt den roten Faden. Unter der Prämisse seines dynamisch-organischen Menschenbildes ist der Mensch dort am vollkommensten, wo ihm ein anderer antwortet. Bachtins Frühwerk ist ein mutiges, aber nicht leicht zugängliches Plädoyer für eine menschliche Einheit in der Vielfalt und Vielfalt in der (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. Reading Oneself in the Text: Cavell and Gadamer’s Romantic Conception of Reading.David Liakos - 2019 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 6 (1):79-87.
    ABSTRACTCan we gain knowledge by reading literature? This essay defends an account of reading, developed by Stanley Cavell and Hans-Georg Gadamer, that phenomenologically describes the experience of acquiring self-knowledge by reading literary texts. Two possible criticisms of this account will be considered: first, that reading can provide other kinds of knowledge than self-knowledge; and, second, that the theory involves illegitimately imposing subjective meaning onto a text. It will be argued, in response, that the self-knowledge gained in reading allows one to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Humor, Law, and Jurisprudence: On Deleuze's Political Philosophy.Russell Ford - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):89-102.
    Dramatization and comedy are recurring themes in Deleuze's work in the 1960′s and, from his book on Nietzsche in 1962 through The Logic of Sense in 1969, remarks on humor and comedy are closely bound to ethical and political concerns. In Nietzsche and Philosophy, he speaks of the “true” and “false” senses of the tragic in order to frame his interpretation of Nietzsche as a whole, but the distinction acquires its immediate importance from its bearing on the question, “what is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. WHY SO SERIOUS?: On Philosophy and Comedy.Russell Ford - 2016 - Angelaki 21 (3):1-11.
    The Western philosophical tradition shows a marked fondness for tragedy. From Plato and Aristotle, through German idealism, to contemporary reflections on the murderous violence of the twentieth century, philosophy has often looked to tragedy for resources to make suffering, grief, and death thinkable. But what if, in showing this preference, philosophical thought has unwittingly and unknowingly aligned itself with a form of thinking that accepts injustice without protest? What if tragedy, and the philosophical thinking that mobilizes it, gives a tacit (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. In Naked Repose: The Face of Candid Portrait Photography.Daniel Palmer - 2011 - Angelaki 16 (1):111-128.
    This paper examines the role of the face as it is caught suspended in private contemplation in candid photography. It starts with a celebrated lineage of photography of anonymous faces that promise the revelation of a secret, absorbed self: Paul Strand's 1916 portrait of a blind street peddler, made with a special right-angled lens; Walker Evans's New York subway portraits, shot clandestinely from under his coat; Luc Delahaye's L’Autre, “stolen” from the Paris Metro in the 1990s; and Philip-Lorca diCorcia's Heads, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Art as Testimony of Tradition and as Testimony of Order.Theodore George - 2017 - Internationales Jahrbuch für Hermeneutik 16 (1):107-120.
    Some critics charge that Gadamer’s approach to our experience of art remains mired in conservatism because he believes our experience of artworks depends on tradition. In this essay, I argue that this charge fails to address the full scope of Gadamer’s considerations of our experience of art. This becomes clear with an emendation that Gadamer appears to make to his Truth and Method account of artistic imitation, or, mimesis, in his later essay “Art and Imitation.” Whereas Gadamer’s approach to mimesis (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. Deleuze sobre a import'ncia do acordo discordante em Kant.Susana Viegas - 2017 - Revista de Filosofia Moderna E Contemporânea 5 (2):329-348.
    Apresentamos a leitura deleuziana do papel e do poder da imaginação e do esquematismo no juízo estético segundo Immanuel Kant destacando, em particular, a importância de se pensar um desacordo entre faculdades e de, no limite, afirmarmos a impossibilidade de uma filosofia da arte. Como se dá o processo que liga sensações e conceitos, arte e filosofia? Ao respondermos a esta questão, também esclarecemos a situação peculiar de Kant na filosofia de Gilles Deleuze e a leitura que este faz em (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. John Cage, Gilles Deleuze, and the Idea of Sound.Iain Campbell - 2017 - Parallax 23 (3):361-378.
    In this essay we will take the American experimental composer John Cage’s understanding of sound as the starting point for an evaluation of that term in the field of sound studies. Drawing together two of the most influential figures in the field, Cage’s thought and work will serve as a lens through which to engage with recent debate concerning the uptake in sound studies of the philosophy of Gilles Deleuze. In so doing we will attempt to develop a path between (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Editors' Introduction.Jussi Backman, Harri Mäcklin & Raine Vasquez - 2017 - Journal of Aesthetics and Phenomenology 4 (2):93-99.
    A brief overview of the current status of the scholarship on Heidegger and contemporary art and of the contributions included in the special issue.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Review: Peter Sloterdijk, Der Ästhetische Imperativ – Schriften Zur Kunst. [REVIEW]Sascha Rashof - 2016 - Theory, Culture and Society 33 (7-8):367-374.
  14. The World Heard: Casablanca and the Music of War.Paul Allen Anderson - 2006 - Critical Inquiry 32 (3):482.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Novelization, a Contaminated Genre?Jan Baetens - 2005 - Critical Inquiry 32 (1):43.
  16. An Exchange on "The Norton Anthology of English Literature" and Sean Shesgreen: V. Abrams - 2009 - Critical Inquiry 35 (4):1079.
  17. Mania, Depression, and the Future of Theory.Elizabeth Abel - 2004 - Critical Inquiry 30 (2):336.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Experience in the Very Moment of Writing: Reconsidering Walter Benjamin's Theory of Mimesis.Atsuko Tsuji - 2010 - Philosophy of Education 44 (1):125-136.
    The purpose of this paper is to examine the ateleological moment of learning through imitation. In general, we can learn something new through imitating models we are given, which embody the values of our own society, culture and institutions. This means that imitation is understood in terms of the representation or reproduction of original models. In this understanding of imitation, however, the creative aspect of imitation is missed. In relation to this I shall, first, consider learning through imitation in terms (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. Ana-Materialism and the Pineal Eye: Becoming Mouth-Breast (or Visual Arts After Descartes, Bataille, Butler, Deleuze and Synthia with an 'S')'.Johnny Golding - 2012 - Philosophy of Photography 3 (1):99-120.
    Ana-materialism & the Pineal Eye provides a landmark interpretation of materialism, representation and the image using the Cartesian conceit of a pineal gland and its voracious sexually embedded appetites. Developing the argument via Bataille's re-invention of the pineal gland as an all-seeing, all- devouring, eye, Golding borrows this move to envision a different analytic approach to digital forms of `matter' and artificial forms of `life'. From her critical engagement with Bataille, Deleuze and Butler, Golding shows why the tools provided by (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  20. Negativity, Iconoclasm, Mimesis: Kristeva and Benjamin on Political Art.Elaine P. Miller - 2008 - Idealistic Studies 38 (1-2):55-74.
    I argue that in Julia Kristeva’s concept of negativity, conceived of as the recuperation, through transformation, of a traumatic remnant of the past, we can find a parallel to what Theodor Adorno, following Walter Benjamin, calls a mimesis that in its emphasis on non-identity is able to remain faithful to the ban on graven images interpreted materialistically rather than theologically. A connection between negativity and the theological ban on images is suggested in Adorno’s claim that a ban on positive representations (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. What Do We Hear When We Hear Music?: A Radical Phenomenology of Music.Ruud Welten - 2009 - Studia Phaenomenologica 9:269-286.
    In this contribution I want to sketch a phenomenology of music, expounding and expanding the philosophy of Michel Henry. In the work of Henry, several approaches to a phenomenology of music are made. The central question of the contribution is: “What do we hear when we hear music?” It is argued that there is an unbridgeable divide between the intentional sphere of the world and its sounds and what in Henry’s philosophy is understood as Life. Music is the language of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. Torture and Photography: Abu Ghraib.Andrew J. Mitchell - 2005 - Radical Philosophy Review 8 (1):1-27.
    "Torture and Photography: Abu Ghraib" attempts to think the mutual relationships between torture and photography, addressingissues of objectivity, publicity, and distance. In a world where bodies have been divested of human rights, the objectification of the camera seems the perfect complement. Exploring the "prophylactic" character of film, the author proposes human "touch" as always in excess of this objectified state of affairs. Along with memoranda from the Bush administration on the issues of detainee rights and the role of torture in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Permeability and Impermeability in John Cameron Mitchell’s Shortbus.D. Rita Alfonso - 2009 - Radical Philosophy Review 12 (1-2):121-136.
    This essay is about experience, and not only about ideas. I have been drawn to write about John Cameron Mitchell’s Shortbus for a number of reasons: First, I find his work to be part of a new turn in LGBT art and media that take queer lives as a point of departure, and not only as narrative focus, for their work. These areworks that are not just about being queer, but cross the line into being queer works. Of those who (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Between Art and the Polis: Between Agamben and Plato.Kalliopi Nikolopoulou - 2011 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 16 (1):17-36.
    In The Man Without Content, Giorgio Agamben makes a few but poignant references to Plato’s understanding of art. Because art’s impact was powerful, Plato deemed art dangerous and subordinated it to politics. In contrast, Agamben argues, modern art enjoys the privilege of formal autonomy at the cost of losing political significance. This essay develops the Platonic dimension in Agamben’s thought: whereas Platonic censorship recognizes art’s power by way of prohibition, the modern culturalist tolerance of art is symptomatic of art’s reduction (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Inspiration, Sublimation and Speech: A Response to Ralph Ellis.Clayton Crockett - 2008 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 15 (2):62-71.
    Ralph Ellis discusses inspiration in important philosophical and psychological ways, and this response to his essay both appreciates and amplifies his discussion and its conclusions by framing them in terms of sublimation and speech, using insights from the work of Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, and Gilles Deleuze. Inspiration is not derived from another plane of existence, but refers to tbe creation of human meaning and value. Inspiration as a form of sublimation conceives sublimation as a process of substitution that avoids (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. The Continental Aesthetics Reader.Clive Cazeaux (ed.) - 2000 - Routledge.
    _The Continental Aesthetics Reader_ brings together classic and contemporary writings on art and aesthetics from the major figures in continental thought. The second edition is clearly divided into seven sections: Nineteenth-Century German Aesthetics Phenomenology and Hermeneutics Marxism and Critical Theory Excess and Affect Embodiment and Technology Poststructuralism and Postmodernism Aesthetic Ontologies. Each section is clearly placed in its historical and philosophical context, and each philosopher has an introduction by Clive Cazeaux. An updated list of readings for this edition includes selections (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  27. A Note on Deleuze and Renaissance Art.Javier Berzal de Dios - 2016 - Substance 45 (1):44-65.
    “Perspective is much more than a secret technique for imitating a reality… It is the invention of a world dominated and possessed through and through.” These inimical words by Maurice Merleau-Ponty encapsulate a customary philosophical position, as explicit and implicit references to early modern culture by critical theorists and continental philosophers lead to an uninviting and even sinister picture. Because of its emphasis on the human eye, quantitative spatial relations, and the virtual incising of pictorial space via linear perspective, the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Klossowski’s Polytheism: An Introduction to Klossowski’s “Nietzsche, Polytheism, and Parody”.Russell Ford - 2004 - Bulletin de la Société Américaine de Philosophie de Langue Française 14 (2):75-81.
    Long recognized as an important and abiding influence in the European artistic and intellectual circles of the last century, the work of Pierre Klossowski is slowly gaining recognition in the Anglo-American scholarly community. The older brother of the painter Balthus, a friend of Rilke and Gide among others, and a celebrated artist in his own right, Klossowski is a difficult if not impossible thinker to categorize. From quite early in his career, Nietzsche was an important influence on Klossowski’s work. In (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (9 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Releasing the Image: From Literature to New Media.Jacques Khalip, Robert Mitchell, Giorgio Agamben, Cesare Casarino, Peter Geimer & Mark Hansen (eds.) - 2011 - Stanford University Press.
    It has become a commonplace that "images" were central to the twentieth century and that their role will be even more powerful in the twenty-first. But what is an image and what can an image be? _Releasing the Image_ understands images as something beyond mere representations of things. Releasing images from that function, it shows them to be self-referential and self-generative, and in this way capable of producing forms of engagement beyond spectatorship and subjectivity. This understanding of images owes much (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. Alain Badiou's Anabasis: Rereading Paul Celan Against Heidegger.Tom Betteridge - 2015 - Textual Practice.
    The essay examines Alain Badiou's concept of ‘anabasis’ and its disclosure in the poetry of Paul Celan. As a conceptualisation of the process of subject formation, anabasis is read as a rejoinder to that of ‘homecoming’, found in Martin Heidegger's appropriation of Friedrich Hölderlin's poems. Following an excursus on the philosophical and the ethical stakes at the heart of these movements, the essay close-reads two of Celan's poems in order to reveal poetry's own attempts to think through trajectories of emergent (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. Art and Phenomenology.Joseph D. Parry (ed.) - 2010 - Routledge.
    Philosophy of art is traditionally concerned with the definition, appreciation and value of art. Through a close examination of art from recent centuries, _Art and Phenomenology_ is one of the first books to explore visual art as a mode of experiencing the world itself, showing how in the words of Merleau-Ponty ‘Painting does not imitate the world, but is a world of its own’. An outstanding series of chapters by an international group of contributors examine the following questions: Paul Klee (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  32. Philosophy and Tragedy.Simon Sparks & Miguel de Beistegui (eds.) - 1999 - Routledge.
    From Plato's _Republic_ and Aristotle's _Poetics_ to Nietzsche's _The Birth of Tragedy_, the theme of tragedy has been subject to radically conflicting philosophical interpretations. Despite being at the heart of philosophical debate from Ancient Greece to the Nineteenth Century, however, tragedy has yet to receive proper treatment as a philosophical tradition in its own right. _Philosophy and Tragedy_ is a compelling contribution to that oversight and the first book to address the topic in a major way. Eleven new essays by (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  33. Becoming-Other: Ontology and Aesthetics in the Critical Theory of Gilles Deleuze.Burcu Baykan - 2014 - In DAKAM LIT CRI '14/ III. Literary Criticism Conference: World Literature and LIterary Criticism Proceedings Book. DAKAM Publishing. pp. 55-60.
  34. Heidegger's Philosophy of Art.S. L. Bartky - 1969 - British Journal of Aesthetics 9 (4):353.
  35. The Purloined Poe. Lacan, Derrida and Psychoanalytic Readings. [REVIEW]Wilfried Ver Eecke - 1991 - Review of Metaphysics 44 (4):858-859.
    This book is an anthology of both previously published and unpublished material consisting of four parts: "Poe and Lacan," "On psychoanalytic reading," "Derrida and responses," and "Other readings." The heart of the anthology is, however, the debate between the psychoanalyst Lacan and the philosopher Derrida. The debate concerns the interpretation of a story written by Poe, "The Purloined Letter." To his long essay on Poe, Lacan gave pride of place by pulling it out of chronological order and placing it as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Philosophy and the Novel: Philosophical Aspects of Middlemarch, Anna Karenina, The Brothers Karamazov, A la Recherche du Temps Perdu, and of the Methods of Criticism. [REVIEW]D. W. Arentz - 1977 - Southwestern Journal of Philosophy 8 (1):174-175.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. Migratory Rhetorics: Conrad, Salih and the Limits of Culture.Russell Ford - 2012 - In Amar Acheraiou & Nursel Icoz (eds.), Conrad and the Orient. Eastern European Monographs / Columbia UP. pp. 211-237.
    Of the critical eyes that have focused upon Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, perhaps none is as insightful as Edward Said. Said repeatedly turned to Conrad’s tale as a privileged point of access to the tensions of colonialism. What is most remarkable about Said’s reading is the hesitancy and uncertainty that surrounds it – qualities that mirror Marlow’s troubles about his own story. Said’s reading is concerned with the form of the story, with its position as a cultural artifact, a tribute (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Das Durchscheinende Bild. Konturen Einer Medialen Phänomenologie.Emmanuel Alloa - 2018 - diaphanes.
    Dass Bilder zwischen dem Regime der Dinge und dem Regime der Zeichen niemals einen angestammten Platz erhielten und nicht Gegenstand einer eigenen Wissenschaft wurden, ist keinem wiedergutzumachenden Vergessen geschuldet, sondern Ausdruck eines anfänglichen Skandalons, das historisch auch die Geburtsstunde der Philosophie einläutete. Bilder lassen sich nicht einmal als reine Erscheinungen absondern, weil in ihnen als Wasserzeichen stets durchscheint, was sie sichtbar werden ließ. An Husserls Grundlegung einer Phänomenologie des Bildes lässt sich das obstinate Unterfangen verfolgen, die Bilderscheinung von jeder medialen (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. What is the Future of the Past? Gadamer and Hegel on the Work of Art in the Age of its Liberation.Theodore George - 2009 - Journal of the British Society for Phenomenology 40 (1):4-20.
    Some more recent scholarship that challenges received wisdom about Gadamer not withstanding, it remains common to associate his hermeneutical approach to art and literature, along with his hermeneutics generally, with political and cultural conservatism. In this essay, however, the author argues that some of Gadamer’s significant, but underappreciated, later essays on Hegel’s aesthetics further support and nuance the rising recognition of Gadamer’s sensitivity to the discontinuities, dislocations, and fractures that pervade any experience of the past. Specifically, Gadamer’s critical response in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. From Work to Play: Gadamer on the Affinity of Art, Truth, and Beauty.Theodore George - 2011 - Internationales Jahrbuch für Hermeneutik 10:107-122.
    In this essay, the author maintains that Gadamer’s affirmation of the relation among art, truth, and beauty is less a sign of conservatism or nostalgia than it is a key to his innovative and insightful examination of our experience of art. Gadamer’s approach to both the truth claim and the beauty of art flows from his association of the being of art with enactment (Vollzug). Yet, increasingly over the course of his writings, Gadamer appears to relinquishes talk of art in (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. La plurinformación televisiva.Jesús Alcalde & Javier Reyes - 2005 - Telos: Critical Theory of the Contemporary 62:64-70.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. From "No Future" to "Delete Yourself ".Robin James - 2013 - Journal of Popular Music Studies 25 (4).
    Beginning with the role of the Sex Pistols’s “God Save the Queen” in Lee Edelman and J. Jack Halberstam’s debates about queer death and failure, I follow a musical motive from the Pistols track to its reappearance in Atari Teenage Riot’s 1995 “Delete Yourself .” In this song, as in much of ATR’s work from the 1990s, overlapping queer and Afro-diasporic aesthetics condense around the idea of death or “bare life.” ATR’s musical strategies treat this death as a form of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. Pierre Klossowski: Such a Deathly Desire (Translation).Russell Ford - 2007 - Albany: State University of New York Press.
    Shocking, brilliant, and eccentric, the French author, translator, and artist Pierre Klossowski (1905-2001) exerted a profound effect on French intellectual culture throughout the twentieth century. The older brother of the painter Balthus, secretary to the novelist Andre Gide, friend to Geroges Bataille and Maurice Blanchot, and heralded as one of the most important voices in the French "return to Nietzsche" by Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze, Klossowski pursued his singular vision of mortal embodiment through a variety of scholarly manifestations. In (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44. Global Translatio: The “Invention” of Comparative Literature, Istanbul, 1933.Emily Apter - 2003 - Critical Inquiry 29 (2):253-281.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  45. Marginalia on Mahler.T. W. Adorno - 1991 - Télos 1991 (87):79-84.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  46. After the Aging of the New Music.D. Barbiero - 1989 - Télos 1989 (82):144-150.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. The Aging of the New Music.T. W. Adorno - 1988 - Télos 1988 (77):95-116.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  48. The Aesthetic Dimension. Toward a Critique of Marxist Aesthetics.C. F. Alford - 1981 - Télos 1981 (48):179-188.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Music and the New Music: In Memory of Peter Suhrkamp.T. W. Adorno - 1980 - Télos 1980 (43):124-138.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. On the Social Situation of Music.T. W. Adorno - 1978 - Télos 1978 (35):128-164.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
1 — 50 / 207