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Derrida: Ethics* (250 | 128)

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  1. Merleau-Ponty, Moral Perception, and Metaethical Internalism.Bryan Lueck - forthcoming - Journal of Speculative Philosophy.
    Two of the most basic commitments of virtue ethics, both ancient and contemporary, are that virtue is knowledge and that this knowledge is a kind of moral sensitivity that is best understood on the model of perception. This view is vulnerable to two potentially very serious objections, both of which concern virtue ethics’ commitment to metaethical internalism, which holds that judgments of the form “x is right” entail some kind of motivation to do x. I argue in this paper that (...)
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  2. Why So Serious: On Philosophy and Comedy.Russell Ford (ed.) - 2018 - New York, NY, USA: Routledge.
    The Western philosophical tradition has shown a marked and perennial fondness for tragedy. From Plato and Aristotle, through the development of Christianity, to German idealism, and even to contemporary reflections on the murderous violence of the twentieth century, philosophy has repeatedly looked to tragedy for resources to make suffering, grief, and death thinkable. But what if by showing such a preference for tragedy, philosophical thought has unwittingly and unknowingly aligned itself with a form of thinking that accepts human suffering and (...)
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  3. French Philosophy Today: New Figures of the Human in Badiou, Meillassoux, Malabou, Serres and Latour.Christopher Watkin - 2016 - Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press.
    Contemporary French philosophy is laying fresh claim to the human. Through a series of independent, simultaneous initiatives, arising in the writing of diverse current French thinkers, the figured of the human is being transformed and reworked. -/- Christopher Watkin draws out both the promises and perils inherent in these attempts to rethink humanity’s relation to ‘nature’ and ‘culture’, to the objects that surround us, to the possibility of social and political change, to ecology and even to our own brains. This (...)
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  4. Speculative Annihilationism: The Intersection of Archaeology and Extinction.Matt Rosen - 2018 - Hampshire, UK: Zero Books.
  5. Levinas and the Second Personal Structure of Free Will.Kevin Houser - forthcoming - In Michael Fagenblat & Melis Erdur (eds.), Levinas and Analytic Philosophy: Second-Personal Normativity and the Moral Life. Research in Phenomenology Series.
    Many suppose some form of free will is required to make moral responsibility possible. Levinas thinks this is backwards. Freedom does not make moral responsibility possible. Moral responsibility makes freedom possible. Free will is not a condition for morality. Free will is an aspect and expression of our moral condition. Key to Levinas’s argument is his rejection of free-will-individualism: the idea that free will is a power a single being could possess. A “contradiction” extracted from standard accounts, and related troubles (...)
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  6. The Differend and the Paradox of Contempt.Bryan Lueck - forthcoming - Parrhesia: A Journal of Critical Philosophy.
    In this paper I begin by suggesting that Immanuel Kant’s argument for the impermissibility of treating others with contempt seems to be subject to a paradox very similar to the well known paradox of forgiveness first described by Aurel Kolnai. Specifically, either the object of the judgment of contempt is not really contemptible, in which case the prohibition on treating him with contempt is superfluous, or else the person truly is contemptible, in which case the prohibition seems unjustifiable, reducing to (...)
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  7. François Laruelle: A Biography of Ordinary Man - On Authorities and Minorities. [REVIEW]Ekin Erkan - 2019 - Cincinnati Romance Review 46:119-123.
    François Laruelle has rightfully earned the title of contemporary French philosophy’s archetypical heretic, having fostered the “non-standard” method of univocal genericity and spurred an altogether radical praxis, inciting a new generation of loyal followers that include Jason Barker and Ray Brassier. Laruelle’s method, often referred to as “non-philosophy” (though “non-philosophy” is an abbreviation of “non-standard philosophy”), withdraws from the metaphysical precept of separating the world into binarisms, perhaps epitomized by the formative division between “universals” and “particulars” in Kant’s Transcendental Deduction. (...)
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  8. Autonome Teilhaftigkeit und teilhaftige Autonomie. Der Andere in Michail M. Bachtins Frühwerk.Carina Pape - 2015 - München, Deutschland: Wilhelm Fink.
    Michail M. Bachtin, der durch die Entwicklung der literaturwissenschaftlichen Paradigmen der Dialogizität und Polyphonie Berühmtheit erlangte, wurde noch nicht ausreichend als Vertreter der ihrerseits vernachlässigten russischen Philosophie wahrgenommen. -/- Bereits in den philosophischen Fragmenten des Frühwerks bilden Dialog und Vielfalt den roten Faden. Unter der Prämisse seines dynamisch-organischen Menschenbildes ist der Mensch dort am vollkommensten, wo ihm ein anderer antwortet. Bachtins Frühwerk ist ein mutiges, aber nicht leicht zugängliches Plädoyer für eine menschliche Einheit in der Vielfalt und Vielfalt in der (...)
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  9. Forgiveness as Institution: A Merleau-Pontian Account.Bryan Lueck - 2019 - Continental Philosophy Review (2):1-15.
    Recent literature on forgiveness suggests that a successful account of the phenomenon must satisfy at least three conditions: it must be able to explain how forgiveness can be articulate, uncompromising, and elective. These three conditions are not logically inconsistent, but the history of reflection on the ethics of forgiveness nonetheless suggests that they are in tension. Accounts that emphasize articulateness and uncompromisingness tend to suggest an excessively deflationary understanding of electiveness, underestimating the degree to which forgiveness is a gift. Accounts (...)
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  10. The Relationality of Disappearance.Neil Vallelly - 2019 - Angelaki: Journal of the Theoretical Humanities 24 (3):38-52.
    In this article I examine what happens to the “I” when the other disappears. I elucidate the relationship between ontic – relational ties to specific others – and ontological relationality – the fundamental relationality that facilitates the very existence of the “I.” The loss of an ontic relationality, I contend, ensures that the “I” can never be the same as it was prior to the loss. But the disappearance of an ontic relationality also accentuates that the “I” cannot disavow its (...)
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  11. Book Reviews: Deleuze and Guattari's Immanent Ethics: Theory, Subjectivity, and Duration, by Tamsin Lorraine. [REVIEW]Ronald Bogue - 2012 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 4 (1):159-161.
  12. Book Review: The Hospitality of God: A Reading of Luke's GospelThe Hospitality of God: A Reading of Luke's GospelbyByrneBrendanLiturgical Press, Collegeville, 2000. 209 Pp. $19.95. ISBN 0-8146-2390-5. [REVIEW]William Sanger Campbell - 2001 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 55 (4):436-438.
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  13. Book Review: Entertaining Angels: Early Christian Hospitality In Its Mediterranean SettingEntertaining Angels: Early Christian Hospitality In Its Mediterranean SettingbyArterburyAndrew E. New Testament Monographs. Sheffield Phoenix, Sheffield, 2005. 227 Pp. $90.00 . ISBN 978-1-905048-21-2. [REVIEW]Mona Tokarek Lafosse - 2008 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 62 (1):102-103.
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  14. Book Review: Hospitality and the Other: Pentecost, Christian Practices and the NeighborHospitality and the Other: Pentecost, Christian Practices and the NeighborbyYongAmosOrbis, Maryknoll, N.Y., 2008169 Pp. $25.00 ISBN 978-1-57075-772-3. [REVIEW]David N. A. Kpobi - 2009 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 63 (2):215-216.
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  15. Obligation and the Fact of Sense.Bryan Lueck - 2019 - Edinburgh University Press.
    This book proposes a substantially new solution to a classic philosophical problem: how is it possible that morality genuinely obligates us, binding our wills without regard to our perceived well-being? Building on Immanuel Kant’s idea of the fact of reason, the book argues that the bindingness of obligation can be traced back to the fact, articulated in different ways by Maurice Merleau-Ponty, Michel Serres, and Jean-Luc Nancy, that we find ourselves responsive, prior to all reflection, to a pre-personal, originary dimension (...)
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  16. Humor, Contempt, and the Exemption From Sense.Bryan Lueck - 2020 - Philosophy Today 64 (1):205-220.
    Building on the theory of humor advanced by Yves Cusset in his recent book Rire: Tractatus philo-comicus, I argue that we can understand the phenomenon in terms of what Jean-Luc Nancy, following Roland Barthes, has called the exemption from sense. I attempt to show how the humorous sensibility, understood in this way, is entirely incompatible with the experience of others as contemptible. I conclude by developing some of the normative implications of this, focusing specifically on the question whether it is (...)
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  17. Aristotle.Jussi Backman - 2017 - In Adam Kotsko & Carlo Salzani (eds.), Agamben's Philosophical Lineage. Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press. pp. 15-26.
    This chapter is an overview of Giorgio Agamben's engagement, in the Homo Sacer series (1995–2014), with Aristotelian philosophy. It specifically studies Agamben's attempt to deconstruct two Aristotelian conceptual oppositions fundamental for the Western tradition of political thought: (1) that between the bare fact of being alive and "qualified" living (associated by Agamben with an alleged distinction between zōē and bios) and (2) that between potentiality (dynamis) and actuality (energeia). Agamben's concept of form-of-life (forma-di-vita), a life that is never "bare" but (...)
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  18. Obligation Without Rule: Bartleby, Agamben, and the Second-Person Standpoint.Bryan Lueck - 2018 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy (2):1-13.
    In Herman Melville’s Bartleby, the Scrivener, the narrator finds himself involved in a moral relation with the title character whose sense he finds difficult to articulate. I argue that we can make sense of this relation, up to a certain point, in terms of the influential account of obligation that Stephen Darwall advances in The Second-Person Standpoint. But I also argue that there is a dimension of moral sense in the relation that is not captured by Darwall’s account, or indeed (...)
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  19. A Thought In Full Self-Dispossession: On Charles Scott's The Language Of Difference And The Question Of Ethics.David Farrell Krell - 1991 - Research in Phenomenology 21 (1):142-148.
  20. The Origins of Responsibility. By François Raffoul. (Indiana UP, 2010. Pp. Xiv + 341.). [REVIEW]Roman Altshuler - 2012 - Philosophical Quarterly 62 (246):217-220.
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  21. Contempt, Community, and the Interruption of Sense.Bryan Lueck - 2017 - Critical Horizons 18 (2):154-167.
    In the early modern period, contempt emerged as a persistent theme in moral philosophy. Most of the moral philosophers of the period shared two basic commitments in their thinking about contempt. First, they argued that we understand the value of others in the morally appropriate way when we understand them from the perspective of the morally relevant community. And second, they argued that we are naturally inclined to judge others as contemptible, and that we must therefore interrupt that natural movement (...)
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  22. Torture and Photography: Abu Ghraib.Andrew J. Mitchell - 2005 - Radical Philosophy Review 8 (1):1-27.
    "Torture and Photography: Abu Ghraib" attempts to think the mutual relationships between torture and photography, addressingissues of objectivity, publicity, and distance. In a world where bodies have been divested of human rights, the objectification of the camera seems the perfect complement. Exploring the "prophylactic" character of film, the author proposes human "touch" as always in excess of this objectified state of affairs. Along with memoranda from the Bush administration on the issues of detainee rights and the role of torture in (...)
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  23. Toward a Concept of Ecological Violence: Heidegger and Mountain Justice.Brandon Absher - 2012 - Radical Philosophy Review 15 (1):89-101.
    I argue in this paper that Mountaintop Removal is part of what I call “ecological violence.” Whereas the common conception of violence perceives it as harm directly inflicted against an individual by a person or group, I seek to illuminate a form of violence that operates in the complex interrelation between people and the environing world they disclose through their practices. Ecological violence, as I understand it, is ecological in that it concerns the practices through which humans understand and uncover (...)
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  24. From Exile to Hospitality: A Key to the Philosophy of Emmanuel Levinas.Abi Doukhan - 2010 - Philosophy Today 54 (3):235-246.
  25. Infinitely Demanding. [REVIEW]Mihail Dafydd Evans - 2008 - Symposium 12 (2):202-205.
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  26. Warfare, Reason, and Moral Truths.Peter McCormick - 2004 - Symposium 8 (2):267-274.
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  27. Gaia and Il y A.Christian Diehm - 2003 - Symposium 7 (2):173-183.
  28. Nietzsche and Foucault on Self-Creation: Two Different Projects.Daniel Nica - 2015 - Annals of the University of Bucharest. Philosophy Series 64 (1):21-41.
    This paper aims to highlight some major differences between the ethics of “self-becoming”, as it was sketched by Friedrich Nietzsche, and the so-called “aesthetics of existence”, which was developed in Michel Foucault’s late work. Although the propinquity between the two authors is a commonplace in Foucauldian exegesis, my claim is that the two projects of self-creation are dissimilar in four relevant aspects. To support my thesis I will use Foucault’s four-part ethical framework through which I will analyze each of the (...)
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  29. Exposition and Obligation: A Serresian Account of Moral Sensitivity.Bryan Lueck - 2014 - Symposium 18 (1):176-193.
    In The Troubadour of Knowledge, Michel Serres demonstrates, by means of an extended discussion of learning, that our capacity to adopt a position presupposes a kind of disorienting exposure to a dimension of pure possibility that both subtends and destabilizes that position. In this paper I trace out the implications of this insight for our understanding of obligation, especially as it is articulated in the moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant. Specifically, I argue that obligation is given along with a dimension (...)
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  30. Ethics at a Standstill.Patrick Gamez - 2008 - Symposium 12 (2):205-209.
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  31. Forging Identities and Respecting Otherness.Stephen Minister - 2005 - Symposium 9 (2):267-287.
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  32. Existentialist Thinkers and Ethics.Kevin Gray - 2007 - Symposium 11 (1):208-210.
  33. Interrogating Ethics.David Morris - 2007 - Symposium 11 (1):180-183.
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  34. On the Ethics of the Gift.Calvin O. Schrag - 2004 - Symposium 8 (2):195-212.
  35. La reiteración del inicio. Aportes para una nueva concepción del tiempo a partir de la filosofía de Emmanuel Levinas.Federico Ignacio Viola - 2016 - Franciscanum. Revista de Las Ciencias Del Espíritu 58 (165):119-143.
    En el presente artículo se intenta poner de relieve cómo la comp- rensión levinasiana del tiempo contribuye a la recuperación del valor y del sentido del instante presente, el cual ha sido menospreciado hasta nuestros días en gran parte de la tradición filosófica en tanto concebido a partir del tiempo, pensado este último como duración. Se trata así pues de pensar el sentido propio del instante en sí mismo, en cuanto momento presente, independientemente del sentido fun- cional que se le (...)
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  36. A Fact, As It Were: Obligation, Indifference, and the Question of Ethics.Bryan Lueck - 2016 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 21 (1):219-234.
    According to Immanuel Kant, the objective validity of obligation is given as a fact of reason, which forces itself upon us and which requires no deduction of the kind that he had provided for the categories in the Critique of Pure Reason. This fact grounds a moral philosophy that treats obligation as a good that trumps all others and that presents the moral subject as radically responsible, singled out by an imperatival address. Based on conceptions of indifference and facticity that (...)
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  37. Communication and Communicability: The Problem of Dignity in Agamben's Remnants of Auschwitz.Bryan Lueck - 2015 - Semiotics 2014:543-553.
  38. Punishment, Desert, and Equality: A Levinasian Analysis.Benjamin S. Yost - 2015 - In Lisa Guenther, Geoffrey Adelsberg & Zeman Scott (eds.), Death and Other Penalties: Philosophy in a Time of Mass Incarceration. Fordham UP.
    The first part of this chapter defends the claim that the over-incarceration of disadvantaged social groups is unjust. Many arguments for penal reform are based on the unequal distribution of punishment, most notably disproportionate punishment of the poor and people of color. However, some philosophers use a noncomparative conception of desert to argue that the justice of punishment is independent of its distribution. On this view, which has significant influence in 14th Amendment jurisprudence, unequal punishment is not unjust. After detailing (...)
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  39. Dignity at the Limit: Jean-Luc Nancy on the Possibility of Incommensurable Worth.Bryan Lueck - 2016 - Continental Philosophy Review 49 (3):309-323.
    Dignity, according to some recent arguments, is a useless concept, giving vague expression to moral intuitions that are better captured by other, better defined concepts. In this paper, I defend the concept of dignity against such skeptical arguments. I begin with a description of the defining features of the Kantian conception of dignity. I then examine one of the strongest arguments against that conception, advanced by Arthur Schopenhauer in On the Basis of Morality. After considering some standard accounts of dignity, (...)
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  40. Preserving Hospitality Through Faith-Based Funding.Eric Manchestern - 2003 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 23 (1):40-50.
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  41. Hospitality in the Context of Academic Life.Peter Gathje - 2003 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 23 (1):28-34.
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  42. Introduction to Hospitality.Richard Kyte - 2003 - Analytic Teaching and Philosophical Praxis 23 (1):26-27.
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  43. Derrida and Lonergan on the Gift.Paulette Kidder - 2005 - Lonergan Workshop 18:139-153.
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  44. Academic Hospitality.Alison Phipps & Ronald Barnett - 2007 - Arts and Humanities in Higher Education 6 (3):237-254.
    Academic hospitality is a feature of academic life. It takes many forms. It takes material form in the hosting of academics giving papers. It takes epistemological form in the welcome of new ideas. It takes linguistic form in the translation of academic work into other languages, and it takes touristic form through the welcome and generosity with which academic visitors are received. These forms intersect each other and may co-exist at any one time. In the midst of the different forms (...)
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  45. Hospitality, Ethics, and Multiculturalism.William Sweet - 2012 - Philosophia 40 (1).
    How is multiculturalism possible in what we call the “postmodern age”? Postmodernity challenges our norms and conventions, our theories of human nature, our grand narratives, and—in general—any essentialist or foundationalist approach. And so it would seem to challenge any attempt to engage in dialogue across cultures or in any way that proposes to be independent of context.One response to this is to focus not on theories but on practices. In particular, I want to focus on the practice of hospitality, of (...)
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  46. Romantic Hospitality: Theorizing the Welcome in Rousseau, Kant, Coleridge, and Mary Shelley.Peter Melville - 2003 - Dissertation, Mcmaster University (Canada)
    If hospitality is, as it is for Jacques Derrida, the sign of the subject's absolute unpreparedness for and disruption by the sudden appearance and arrival of difference, then what can be said about the theme of the hospitable during a period of English and European culture which is as unsettled by revolution and rapid change as the late eighteenth and early nineteenth century? A theoretical nodal point of increasing anxiety in this age of political and international uncertainty, the category of (...)
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  47. Diane Moira Duncan, The Pre-Text of Ethics: On Derrida and Levinas. [REVIEW]Christopher Mctavish - 2002 - Philosophy in Review 22:405-406.
  48. Under the Sign of the Hostess: Hospitality, Ethics, and the Expropriation of Identity.Tracy Kathleen Mcnulty - 1998 - Dissertation, University of California, Irvine
    The problem of hospitality is coextensive with the development of Western civilization, occupying an essential place in virtually every religion and defining the most elementary social relations. But it also expresses a particular tension. Etymologically, the host is the "master," the one who "eminently personifies" identity: not only his own identity, but that of the group in whose name he acts. But as an accidental encounter with what can be neither foreseen nor legislated, hospitality also insists upon the primacy of (...)
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  49. In Search of Hospitality Theoretical Perspectives and Debates.Conrad Lashley & Alison J. Morrison - 2000
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  50. Experiences of “Hospitality” by Racialized Immigrant Pre-Service Teachers on Canadian School Landscapes: A Phenomenological Perspective.Rochelle Skogen & Paulin Mulatris - 2011 - Phenomenology and Practice 5 (2):20-39.
    Through a phenomenological perspective, we frame the experiences of “hospitality” of racialized immigrant student teachers as they recount their field placements in a number of Canadian schools. This article presents the following themes which emerged from the study, and which also serve as section titles: 1) The classroom door as threshold: Crossing workaday and festive worlds; 2) More foreign than foreign; Stranger than strange; 3) You are who I think you are; Not who you know you are; 4) Actively inviting (...)
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