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Summary

Continental feminist philosophy refers to feminist thought emerging from various continental philosophical and intellectual traditions. In France in particular, movements such as existentialism, psychoanalysis, phenomenology, and deconstruction have been taken up by feminist thinkers, making central questions of gender, sexual difference, women’s sexuality, women’s language, and the presence, or more accurately the absence, of women in the dominant Western philosophical tradition. In the Anglophone context, new areas of continental feminism have emerged including gender theory, feminist race theory, feminist phenomenology, post/de-colonial feminist theory, and queer theory.  Continental feminism includes all these, plus continentally informed critical-feminist approaches to knowledge and science, economic and political structures, cultural practices (arts, popular culture, practices of everyday life), and approaches to and engagements with contemporary and historical figures in the continental philosophical tradition.

Key works Simone de Beauvoir’s insight that “one is not born, but becomes a woman” in De Beauvoir 1952 arguably marks the inception of contemporary continental feminism. Other foundational texts for French feminist philosophy include Cixous 1976Irigaray 1985, and Kristeva 1984. Other key figures are Michèle Le Doeuff, Sarah Kofman, and Monique Wittig. For a key text in Italian feminist philosophy, see Cavarero 2002. In the Anglophone context, Butler 1990 has been vastly influential. Butler synthesizes insights from thinkers as diverse as Michel Foucault, Friedrich Nietzsche, J.L. Austin, de Beauvoir, and Wittig among others; this text more or less gave birth to the fields of gender theory and queer theory. Spivak 1981 provides a postcolonial and deconstructive context for French feminism. Cornell 1991 melds deconstruction and Lacanian psychoanalysis into a feminist critique of law. Grosz 1994, takes up the thought of Irigaray and Deleuze along with phenomenology to forge work on the body that became foundational to the confluence of feminism and “new materialisms,” while Young 2005 stands as a key example of feminist phenomenology in the lineage of Maurice Merleau-Ponty.
Introductions

Cahill & Hansen 2003: A fine introductory reader in continental feminism. Davidson et al 2010: Excellent introduction to black feminist continental philosophy. Irigaray 1985: Irigaray's foundational collection of essays and interviews explains her philosophical methodology and early positions on a variety of issues. Olkowski 2000: Offers a slew of recent feminist engagements with French philosophy. Le Dœuff 1991: Essays on being a woman in philosophy in France, rereading the history of Western philosophy as a feminist.

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  1. Zygmunt Bauman (1995). Life in Fragments: Essays in Postmodern Morality. Blackwell.
    Life in Fragments is a continuation of the themes and motifs explored in Zygmunt Bauman's acclaimed study, Postmodern Ethics (Blackwell, 1993).
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  2. Rudolf Bernet (1998). Sublimation and Symbolization. Ethical Perspectives 5 (3):210-217.
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  3. Lawrence A. Blum (1982). Kant's and Hegel's Moral Rationalism: A Feminist Perspective. Canadian Journal of Philosophy 12 (2):287 - 302.
  4. Victoria I. Burke (forthcoming). Conscience Exemptions in Medicine: A Hegelian Feminist Perspective. International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2).
    In this article, I defend the view that conscience exemption clauses for medical practitioners (doctors, nurses, technicians, pharmacists) should be limited by patient protection clauses. This view was also defended by Mark Wicclair, in his book on conscience exemptions in medicine (Cambridge UP, 2011). In this article, I defend Wicclair’s view by supplementing it with Hegelian ethical theory and feminist critical theory. Conscience exemptions are important to support as a matter of human rights. They support an individual’s right to protect (...)
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  5. Judith Butler (2002). Antigone's Claim: Kinship Between Life and Death. Cambridge University Press.
    The celebrated author of _Gender Trouble_ here redefines Antigone's legacy, recovering her revolutionary significance and liberating it for a progressive feminism and sexual politics. Butler's new interpretation does nothing less than reconceptualize the incest taboo in relation to kinship -- and open up the concept of kinship to cultural change. Antigone, the renowned insurgent from Sophocles's _Oedipus,_ has long been a feminist icon of defiance. But what has remained unclear is whether she escapes from the forms of power that she (...)
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  6. Craig Carely, Nietzsche's Misogyny: A Class Action Suit. Proceedings of the Heraclitean Society 19.
  7. Sue L. Cataldi (1999). Sexuality Situated: Beauvoir on "Frigidity". Hypatia 14 (4):70-82.
  8. Hector M. Cavallari (1987). Scandalous Textualities. American Journal of Semiotics 5 (1):151-165.
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  9. Dani Cavallaro (2003). French Feminist Theory an Introduction.
  10. Caze Marguerite la (2008). Seeing Oneself Through the Eyes of the Other: Asymmetrical Reciprocity and Self-Respect. Hypatia 23 (3):118-135.
    Iris Marion Young argues we cannot understand others' experiences by imagining ourselves in their place or in terms of symmetrical reciprocity (1997a). For Young, reciprocity expresses moral respect and asymmetry arises from people's greatly varying life histories and social positions. La Caze argues there are problems with Young's articulation of asymmetrical reciprocity in terms of wonder and the gift. By discussing friendship and political representation, she shows how taking self-respect into account complicates asymmetrical reciprocity.
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  11. Marguerite la Caze (2005). Love, That Indispensable Supplement: Irigaray and Kant on Love and Respect. Hypatia 20 (3):92-114.
    Is love essential to ethical life, or merely a supplement? In Kant's view, respect and love, as duties, are in tension with each other because love involves drawing closer and respect involves drawing away. By contrast, Irigaray says that love and respect do not conflict because love as passion must also involve distancing and we have a responsibility to love. I argue that love, understood as passion and based on respect, is essential to ethics.
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  12. G. M. Chambers (1914). From Girlhood to Womanhood. The Eugenics Review 6 (2):171.
  13. Tina Chanter (2010). Antigone's Political Legacies: Abjection in Defiance of Mourning. In S. E. Wilmer & Audrone Zukauskaite (eds.), Interrogating Antigone in Postmodern Philosophy and Criticism. Oxford University Press.
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  14. Dianne Chisholm (2008). Climbing Like a Girl: An Exemplary Adventure in Feminist Phenomenology. Hypatia 23 (1):9-40.
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  15. Judith Clavir (1979). Choosing Either/Or: A Critique of Metaphysical Feminism. Feminist Studies 5 (2):402.
  16. Cynthia D. Coe (2009). Visible Identities: Race, Gender, and the Self (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 23 (3):pp. 264-266.
  17. Vincent Colapietro (2016). Experiments in Self-Interruption: A Defining Activity of Psychoanalysis, Philosophy, and Other Erotic Practices. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 30 (2):128-143.
    “The world is,” William James notes, “full of partial stories that run parallel to one another, beginning and ending at odd times. They mutually interlace and interfere at points, but we cannot unify them completely in our minds”. As a radical empiricist, he takes there to be more to experience than any of our stories or other forms of account can ever capture. Here as everywhere else, “ever not quite” and “ever not yet” qualify even our master strokes. As a (...)
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  18. Claudia Ruggiero Corradini (2002). Modesta Dal Pozzo [Moderata Fonte] (1555–1592): "Women's Merit's". Philosophical Forum 33 (3):254–257.
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  19. Nicholas Dixon (2007). Romantic Love, Appraisal, and Commitment. Philosophical Forum 38 (4):373–386.
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  20. Sylvie Duverger (2007). Who’s Afraid of Gay Parents? Radical Philosophy 146.
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  21. Urban Foster (1936). Mr. Nicholson Abdicates. New Blackfriars 17 (201):936-939.
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  22. Lucienne Frappier-Mazur & Anne Emmanuelle Berger (1994). Le Banquet de Rimbaud. Recherches Sur L'Oralite. Substance 23 (1):119.
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  23. Nanette Funk & Andrew Wengraf (1998). Honoring Gertrude Ezorsky: The Society for Women in Philosophy's 1997 Distinguished Woman Professor. Radical Philosophy Review 1 (2):126-132.
    The paper included here was presented by Nanette Funk in Honor of Gertrude Ezorsky, the famed philosopher, feminist, and antiracism activist, at the 1997 Meeting of the Society for Women in Philosophy. It is published here as presented. Thus, although it is a coauthored talk the “I” refers to Nanette Funk.
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  24. Diana Garvin (2015). Taylorist Breastfeeding in Rationalist Clinics: Constructing Industrial Motherhood in Fascist Italy. Critical Inquiry 41 (3):655-674.
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  25. R. Harré (1959). In Reply To Mrs. Nicholson. Philosophy 34 (129):157-.
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  26. Michel Henry (1988). The Critique of the Subject. Topoi 7 (2):147-153.
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  27. Gottfried Heuer (ed.) (2010). Sexual Revolutions: Psychoanalysis, History and the Father. Routledge.
    The ideas of psychoanalyst Otto Gross have had a seminal influence on the development of psychoanalytic theory and clinical practice and yet his work has been largely overlooked. For Freud, he was one of only two analysts ‘capable of making an original contribution', and Jung called Gross 'my twin brother' in the course of their mutual analysis. This is a major interdisciplinary enquiry into the history, nature and plausibility of the idea of a 'sexual revolution', drawing also on the related (...)
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  28. Luce Irigaray (2013). Je, Tu, Nous: Toward a Culture of Difference. Routledge.
    First published in 1993. Routledge is an imprint of Taylor & Francis, an informa company.
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  29. Elizabeth Jelinek (2015). An Examination of Plato’s Chora. Environment, Space, Place 7 (1):7-27.
    In the Timaeus, Plato’s creation story, Plato describes an entity he refers to as the chora. The Greek word chora is translated as place, room, or space, but Plato’s descriptions of the chora are so notoriously enigmatic that there is disagreement about what, exactly, he intends to indicate by it. In this paper, I address an interpretation of the chora according to which the chora is a kind of cosmic mirror. I argue that this interpretation results in an uncharitable reading (...)
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  30. Heather Keith (2004). Line Drawings: Defining Women Through Feminist Practice (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 18 (4):326-329.
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  31. Nancy Luxon (2016). Beyond Mourning and Melancholia: Nostalgia, Anger and the Challenges of Political Action. Contemporary Political Theory 15 (2):139-159.
  32. Mary Lydon & Sharon Willis (1989). Marguerite Duras: Writing on the Body. Substance 18 (2):134.
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  33. Mary Magada-Ward (2010). Feminist Epistemology and American Pragmatism: Dewey and Quine (Review). Journal of Speculative Philosophy 24 (2):197-200.
    Alexandra Shuford's book is primarily designed to address the following question: "What can Deweyan pragmatism contribute to a feminist empiricist epistemology?" (viii). Her answer is Dewey's conception of habit, and in her final chapter, she illustrates the utility of this conception by comparing what she labels the "medicalized" model of labor and birth to that employed by practitioners of midwifery. Before looking at Shuford's reading of this contrast more closely, however, it needs to be noted at the outset that she (...)
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  34. Noëlle McAfee (2005). Two Feminisms. Journal of Speculative Philosophy 19 (2):140-149.
  35. David W. McIvor (2016). The Cunning of Recognition: Melanie Klein and Contemporary Critical Theory. Contemporary Political Theory 15 (3):243-263.
  36. Andrew J. McKenna & Michael Fischer (1987). Does Deconstruction Make Any Difference: Post-Structuralism and the Defense of Poetry in Modern Criticism. Substance 16 (3):84.
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  37. Mir-Hosseini (2006). Muslim Women's Quest for Equality: Between Islamic Law and Feminism. Critical Inquiry 32 (4):629.
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  38. Kelly Oliver (2016). Womanizing Nietzsche: Philosophy's Relation to the "Feminine". Routledge.
    In ____Womanizing Nietzsche,__ Kelly Oliver uses an analysis of the position of woman in Nietzsche's texts to open onto the larger question of philosophy's relation to the feminine and the maternal. Offering readings from Nietzsche, Derrida, Irigaray, Kristeva, Freud and Lacan, Oliver builds an innovative foundation for an ontology of intersubjective relationships that suggests a new approach to ethics.
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  39. Abel Rey (1928). French Philosophy in 1926 and 1927. Philosophical Review 37 (6):527-556.
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  40. W. N. Reynolds (1968). Uniaxial Textures in Cubic Materials. Philosophical Magazine 18 (156):1155-1159.
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  41. Kathryn Russell (2007). Feminist Dialectics and Marxist Theory. Radical Philosophy Review 10 (1):33-54.
    Both feminists and Marxists have realized that it is necessary to avoid reductionism and recognize the intersections between gender, race, and class. But we donot have a methodology sufficient to develop this idea. I argue that Bertell Ollman’s book Dance of the Dialectic provides a way to think about intersectionality usingMarx’s methodology of abstraction and his theory of internal relations. As a relational abstraction, gender is intersectional. We may legitimately focus on it, as longas we treat it dialectically. We can (...)
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  42. Chloë Taylor (2007). Gender. Symposium: Canadian Journal of Continental Philosophy/Revue canadienne de philosophie continentale 11 (2):465-467.
  43. Garrett Thomson (1987). Needs. Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    I CLASSIFICATION AND CLARIFICATION Need is a very important concept comparatively little studied by philosophers. Kenny. I One day, sit in Parliament and ...
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  44. William Vallicella (1986). Review Article: Nicholson's SEEING AND READING. Noûs (3).
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  45. Philippe van Haute (1998). About Sublimation. Ethical Perspectives 5 (3):218-224.
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  46. Clifford van Ommen (2014). Review of Neurofeminism: Issues at the Intersection of Feminist Theory and Cognitive Science. [REVIEW] Journal of Theoretical and Philosophical Psychology 34 (4):279-282.
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  47. Richard White (2015). Dialectics of Mourning. Angelaki 20 (4):179-192.
    In this paper, I look at three different perspectives on mourning in recent European thought. First, I consider Freud's discussion in “Mourning and Melancholia” and other writings. Next, I look at Roland Barthes, whose book on photography, Camera Lucida, is itself a work of mourning for his late mother; and Jacques Derrida, who in Memoires for Paul de Man and The Work of Mourning memorializes departed friends and describes the ambiguities of mourning that constrain us. I argue that Freud was (...)
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Simone de Beauvoir
  1. Anna Alexander (2011). Outside the Second Sex: Beauvoir's "Pensée du Dehors". Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 13 (1).
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  2. Meryl Altman (2007). Beauvoir, Hegel, War. Hypatia 22 (3):66-91.
    : The importance of Hegel to the philosophy of Simone de Beauvoir, both to her early philosophical texts and to The Second Sex, is usually discussed in terms of the master-slave dialectic and a Kojève–influenced reading, which some see her as sharing with Sartre, others persuasively describe as divergent from and corrective to Sartre's. Altman shows that Hegel's influence on Beauvoir's work is also wider, both in terms of what she takes on board and what she works through and rejects, (...)
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  3. Meryl Altman (2007). Beauvoir, Hegel, War. Hypatia: A Journal of Feminist Philosophy 22 (3):66-91.
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