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  1. Nietzsche's Misogyny: A Class Action Suit.Craig Carely - unknown - Proceedings of the Heraclitean Society 19.
  2. Foucault, Rape, and the Construction of the Feminine Body.Alfred H. Fuchs - forthcoming - Hypatia.
  3. The Hysteric Rebels: Rethinking Socio-Political Transformation with Foucault and Lacan.Claudia Leeb - forthcoming - Theory and Event.
    In this article I bring Lacan and Foucault in conversation to show that both theorized the hysteric subject as the moment of the limit in power discourses, and as the paradigmatic example of a political subject that not only rebels but radically transforms power structures. I also analyze Freud’s case of Dora as an example of a psychoanalytic power discourse that aims to discipline woman into the norm of female, bourgeois and heterosexual subjectivity, against which Dora successfully rebelled. The article (...)
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  4. The Affirmative Culture of Healthy Self-Care: A Feminist Critique of the Good Health Imperative.Talia Welsh - 2020 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 13 (1):27-44.
    Feminists have worked extensively to explore how our contemporary capitalist and neoliberal world creates docile subjects. One feature of this docility is the focus on fostering subjects that not only are good consumers and workers but also subjects that make good choices—that is, choices that do not disrupt capitalist postcolonial distributions of wealth, power, and control. One example of this trend is the focus in public health discourses in the last several decades of seeing unhealthy bodies as objects that need (...)
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  5. The Apparitions of Emotion: Toward a Performative Affect-Theory of Assembly.Katherine Howard - 2019 - Raisons Politiques 76 (4):107-120.
    Judith Butler's recent work in political theory, especially the 2015 book Notes Toward a Performative Theory of Assembly, explores the bodily dimensions of action not limited to vocalization. This performative action-theory relies heavily on Hannah Arendt's concept of the “space of appearance” and on her notion of “action in concert.” And yet, if part of Butler's purpose is to understand better how “bodily acts become performative,” then a fuller turn toward the affective dimensions of embodiment is necessary. Using recent work (...)
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  6. A Critical Feminist Exchange: Symposium on Claudia Leeb, Power and Feminist Agency in Capitalism: Toward a New Theory of the Political Subject, Oxford University Press, 2017.Laurie E. Naranch, Mary Caputi & Claudia Leeb - 2019 - Political Theory 47 (4):559-580.
    In this critical feminist exchange Laurie Naranch and Mary Caputi review my recently published book Power and Feminist Agency in Capitalism: Toward a New Theory of the Political Subject (2017, Oxford University Press), and I provide a response to their reviews.
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  7. Feminism and Heterodoxy.Hasana Sharp - 2019 - Philosophy Today 63 (3):795-803.
    How could a philosopher who insists on the exclusion of women from citizenship and state office by virtue of their insuperable weakness be an inspiration for feminism? The puzzles over Spinoza’s egalitarian credentials pose a problem particularly if one understands feminism primarily or exclusively as a demand for equality with men. When feminism is seen as a subcategory of Enlightenment commitments, one may choose to see Spinoza’s misogyny as superficial and as a betrayal of the radical potential of the egalitarianism (...)
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  8. Diagnose van de Moderne Filosoof: Waarom filosofen gek zijn.Nicole Des Bouvrie - 2018 - Eindhoven: Damon.
    Zijn filosofen gek? Zo ja, waarom? En ligt dat dan aan de filosoof, aan de filosofie of aan de diagnostiek? Dat zijn de vragen die in 'Diagnose van de moderne filosoof' centraal staan. Nicole des Bouvrie neemt aan de hand van het diagnostische handboek van psychiaters en psychologen (de DSM-V) de situatie van de hedendaagse denker onder de loep. Autisme, psychoses, anorexia en andere aandoeningen passeren de revue, om aan de hand van een grondige anamnese van hedendaagse denkbeelden uit de (...)
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  9. Open Future, Regaining Possibility.Helen A. Fielding - 2017 - In Helen A. Fielding & Dorothea Olkowski (eds.), Feminist Phenomenology Futures. Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press. pp. 91-109.
    Helen Fielding considers how the repetition of the same can be phenomenally shifted. Considering the phenomenon of death by suicide in response to cyberbullying, she asks how cyberspace as a system can be opened up and become more responsive to the living affect of young women subjected to abuse. At the heart of this problem is the breakdown of personal time into objective time, whereby the inexhaustible potentiality of the living world is collapsed into the indifferent infinity of the possible (...)
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  10. The Pursuit of Existentialism: From Sartre and de Beauvoir to Zizek and Badiou.Jones Irwin - 2017 - Routledge.
    _The Pursuit of Existentialism_ explores how existentialism has survived and how its key themes and concerns remain integral to continental philosophy today. _The Pursuit of Existentialism_ places the creation of existentialism - in the work of Sartre, Camus and Beauvoir - in its historical context, assessing how it drew on the work of Nietzsche and Kierkegaard. The book then goes on to focus on the complex heritage of post-Sartrean thinking from Heidegger to today. Theorists and schools covered include: Heidegger's infamous (...)
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  11. Foucault and Feminist Philosophy of Disability (Winner of the Tobin Siebers Prize for Disability Studies in the Humanities for 2016).Shelley Tremain - 2017 - Ann Arbor, Michigan: University of Michigan Press.
  12. The Adult-Child Relationship in Breastfeeding and Development: A Merleau-Pontian Perspective on the Existential and Social Conflicts in Childrearing.Talia Welsh - 2017 - Phenomenology and the Cognitive Sciences 16 (4):649-659.
    This paper discusses Merleau-Ponty’s use of idea of ambivalence and its role in psychological conflicts. Merleau-Ponty affirms ambivalent conflicts as lived and social rather than biologically determined, as one might have in some developmental accounts, or hidden, as in some psychoanalytic accounts. With this concept, the paper takes up feminist considerations of the conflicts experienced by mothers in breastfeeding. It argues that the Merleau-Pontian and feminist approach to considering breastfeeding provides a nuanced model for thinking about development that is better (...)
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  13. Inheriting Gratefulness.Perry Zurn - 2017 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 7 (1):125-131.
  14. Conscience Exemptions in Medicine: A Hegelian Feminist Perspective.Victoria I. Burke - 2016 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 30 (2):267-287.
    In this article, I defend the view that conscience exemption clauses for medical practitioners (doctors, nurses, technicians, pharmacists) should be limited by patient protection clauses. This view was also defended by Mark Wicclair, in his book on conscience exemptions in medicine (Cambridge UP, 2011). In this article, I defend Wicclair’s view by supplementing it with Hegelian ethical theory and feminist critical theory. Conscience exemptions are important to support as a matter of human rights. They support an individual’s right to protect (...)
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  15. The Language of Violence: Chiastic Encounters.Marguerite Caze - 2016 - Sophia 55 (1):115-127.
    In her recent book, Violence and the Philosophical Imaginary, Ann Murphy suggests that the philosophical imaginary, in particular that of contemporary continental philosophy, is imbued with images of violence. The concept of the philosophical imaginary is drawn from the work of Michèle Le Dœuff to explore the role of images of violence in philosophy. Murphy sets the language of violence, reflexivity, and critique against that of vulnerability, ambiguity and responsibility. Her concern is that images of violence have become and may (...)
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  16. Foucault’s Sad Heterotopology of the Body.Verena Erlenbusch - 2016 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 6 (2):171-194.
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  17. Corrupting Conversations with the Marquis de Sade: On Education, Gender, and Sexuality.Adam J. Greteman - 2016 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 35 (6):605-620.
    In this essay, the author joins a conversation started by Martin regarding gender and education seeking to extend the conversation to address sexuality. To do so, the author brings a reading of the Marquis de Sade to challenge the emphasis on reproduction in education as it relates to gendered and sexual norms. The author, following Martin’s approach in Reclaiming the Conversation, reads one particular text of Sade’s—Philosophy in the Bedroom—to argue for queer possibilities that Sade brings to the conversation around (...)
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  18. Pedagogy and Plurality in the Work of Michèle Le Dœuff.Samir Haddad - 2016 - Journal of Speculative Philosophy 30 (3):414-424.
    My aim in this article is to analyze and extend Michèle Le Dœuff’s work on philosophy’s exclusionary practices, examining and enhancing both her diagnosis of the problem and how philosophy might be transformed. I proceed in three steps. First, I briefly outline the main features of Le Dœuff’s account of the reasons for the exclusion of women from philosophy. Le Dœuff’s focus is on the structure of philosophical pedagogy and its implications for the philosophical imaginary. Second, I examine Le Dœuff’s (...)
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  19. The Language of Violence: Chiastic Encounters.Marguerite La Caze - 2016 - Sophia 55 (1):115-127.
    In her recent book, Violence and the Philosophical Imaginary, Ann Murphy suggests that the philosophical imaginary, in particular that of contemporary continental philosophy, is imbued with images of violence. The concept of the philosophical imaginary is drawn from the work of Michèle Le Dœuff to explore the role of images of violence in philosophy. Murphy sets the language of violence, reflexivity, and critique against that of vulnerability, ambiguity and responsibility. Her concern is that images of violence have become and may (...)
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  20. New Philosophies of Sex and Love: Thinking Through Desire.Sarah LaChance Adams, Christopher M. Davidson & Caroline R. Lundquist - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    Our amorous and erotic experiences do not simply bring us pleasure; they shape our very identities, our ways of relating to ourselves, each other and our shared world. This volume reflects on some of our most prevalent assumptions relating to identity, the body, monogamy, libido, sexual identity, seduction, fidelity, orgasm, and more.The book covers common conflicts and confusions and includes work by established scholars and innovative new thinkers. Philosophically challenging but highly readable, the volume is ideal for a wide range (...)
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  21. The Cunning of Recognition: Melanie Klein and Contemporary Critical Theory.David W. McIvor - 2016 - Contemporary Political Theory 15 (3):243-263.
  22. Emancipation Without Utopia: Subjection, Modernity, and the Normative Claims of Feminist Critical Theory.Amy Allen - 2015 - Hypatia 30 (3):513-529.
    Feminist theory needs both explanatory-diagnostic and anticipatory-utopian moments in order to be truly critical and truly feminist. However, the explanatory-diagnostic task of analyzing the workings of gendered power relations in all of their depth and complexity seems to undercut the very possibility of emancipation on which the anticipatory-utopian task relies. In this paper, I take this looming paradox as an invitation to rethink our understanding of emancipation and its relation to the anticipatory-utopian dimensions of critique, asking what conception of emancipation (...)
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  23. The Return of Mythic Voice in the Aporias of Narcissism: Pleshette DeArmitt’s Ethical Idea.Sara Beardsworth - 2015 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 23 (2):14-27.
    The ordeal of mourning, being so much harder than any thought its experience may deliver, bears out the impression developed in Julia Kristeva’s opening to The Severed Head —that thought is swift. She has recognized as well as anyone the interplay of blindness and insight. Nothing brings all this into starker evidence than the premature death of a loved other, a friend, or a true assistant in life and thought. There is a reminder in this that the new narratives of (...)
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  24. L'attention aux récits sur soi. Paul Ricoeur et Carol Gilligan autour du tragique freudien.Marjolaine Deschênes - 2015 - Logoi.Ph (En Ligne: Http://Logoi.Ph) 1 (2):322-338.
    This article shows that Paul Ricoeur and Carol Gilligan develop their theories of the self by borrowing critically from Freudian aesthetics, adding an ethical dimension missing in it. Ricoeur critiques, completes and endorses the Freudian interpretation of the Oedipus, while Gilligan rejects it, since she considers it distorted by patriarchal ideology. Both are reclaiming the Freudian theory of culture by focusing on what Freud called the «life drive» as opposed to the «death drive». But Ricoeur does not pay the same (...)
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  25. Derrida and Feminism: Recasting the Question of Woman.Ellen Feder, Mary C. Rawlinson & Emily Zakin (eds.) - 2015 - New York: Routledge.
    The first-ever compilation of articles that highlights the intersection of Derridean and feminist theories--a work that represents the extensive and diverse response feminist theorists have had to Derrida, particularly to the issues of gender, identity, and the construction of the subject.
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  26. Dwelling and Public Art: Serra and Bourgeois.Helen A. Fielding - 2015 - In Patricia M. Locke & Rachel McCann (eds.), Merleau-Ponty: Space, Place, Architecture. Athens: Ohio University Press. pp. 258-281.
    How do permanent artworks installed in public places shape the relations that take place around them? Drawing upon the works of Maurice Merleau-Ponty and Luce Irigaray I claim that two public artworks, Richard Serra’s Tilted Spheres (2002-2004) and a bronze casting of Louise Bourgeois’ Maman (1999) work to open up embodied being and to creatively transform reality. Serra’s work reveals an important aspect of public space, that of the space/time of the anonymous body, as well as the ways in which (...)
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  27. Taylorist Breastfeeding in Rationalist Clinics: Constructing Industrial Motherhood in Fascist Italy.Diana Garvin - 2015 - Critical Inquiry 41 (3):655-674.
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  28. Continental Approaches in Bioethics.Melinda C. Hall - 2015 - Philosophy Compass 10 (3):161-172.
    Bioethics influences public policy, scientific research, and clinical practice. Thinkers in Continental traditions have increasingly contributed scholarship to this field, and their approaches allow new insights and alternative normative guidance. In this essay, examples of the following Continental approaches in bioethics are presented and considered: phenomenology and existentialism; deconstruction; Foucauldian methodologies; and biopolitical analyses. Also highlighted are Continental feminisms and the philosophy of disability. Continental approaches are importantly diverse, but those I focus upon here reveal embedded models of individualized autonomy (...)
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  29. From Narcissus to Genius Through the Work of Pleshette DeArmitt.Marygrace Hemme - 2015 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 23 (2):59-66.
    Through my reading of the section of Pleshette Dearmitt’s book The Right to Narcissism, entitled “Kristeva: the Rebirth of Narcissus,” I illustrate the way in which DeArmitt’s reading of Narcissus is reflected in Julia Kristeva’s conception of genius. DeArmitt describes narcissism as a structure through which subjectivity, language, self-love, and love for the other come about. Narcissism develops through a metaphorical relation of identification with a “loving third” in which the subject-in-formation is transferred to the site of the other, to (...)
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  30. On Hegel, Women, and the Foundation of Ethical Life: Why Gender Doesn’T Belong in the Family.Laura Wildemann Kane - 2015 - Clio: A Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 44 (1):1-17.
    Feminist philosophers are right to criticize Hegel’s prejudices against women. In many of his works, Hegel reduces women to their physiology as means of explaining why they occupy a subordinate role in nature and in society. Such treatment seems arbitrary at best, for the gendering of roles disrupts Hegel’s dialectical approach to spirit without any meaningful gain. Despite this defect in Hegel’s work, what is positive in Hegelian social and political philosophy remains intact. In this paper I argue that the (...)
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  31. The Significance of Narcissism.Claire Elise Katz - 2015 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 23 (2):50-58.
    This essay briefly reviews the significance of Pleshette DeArmitt's book, The Right to Narcissism. The essay, originally presented at the 2015 Kristeva Circle, was part of a panel celebrating the work of Pleshette.
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  32. Decolonizing Gender, Decolonizing Philosophy.Rozena Maart - 2015 - Radical Philosophy Review 18 (1):69-91.
    This essay situates the narrative of two Black women—one from the Black Consciousness Movement of Azania, one from the Black Panther Party—as central to the process of decolonizing philosophy and decolonizing gender. It offers a Black Consciousness critique of gender and philosophy, which both form the prelude to the narratives. Psychoanalysis, as the hermeneutics of the subject, is central to the process of interpretation and thus the interrogation of racism and colonialism. This essay shifts the paradigm of thinking by situating (...)
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  33. Echoes of Beauty: In Memory of Pleshette DeArmitt.Elaine P. Miller - 2015 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 23 (2):67-75.
    There is a special poignancy to the fact that Pleshette DeArmitt's essay "Sarah Kofman's Art of Affirmation" foregrounds Freud's essay "On Transience," in which he muses on the fact that beauty seems to be inextricably linked to a fleeting existence. As DeArmitt writes, "beauty, even in full flowering, foreshadows its own demise, causing what Freud describes as 'a foretaste of mourning.'" Such a transience, in Freud's mind, increases rather than decreases the worth of all that is beautiful. In her essay, (...)
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  34. Psychoanalysis and Deconstruction, A Love Story.Kelly Oliver - 2015 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 23 (2):35-44.
    In The Right to Narcissism: A Case for Im-Possible Self-Love, Pleshette DeArmitt opens the space for an alternative to origin story so popular with political philosophers, namely, the social contract, which assumes a rational and self-identical subject. She does this obliquely by deconstructing narcissism as love of the self-same, or, love of what Kristeva might call “the clean and proper self.” Like Echo interrupting Narcissus’s soliloquy of deadly self-absorbed pleasure and his solitary auto-affection upon seeing his own reflection, Pleshette interrupts (...)
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  35. Human Rights, Women's Rights, Gender Mainstreaming, and Diversity: The Language Question.Yvanka B. Raynova - 2015 - In Community, Praxis, and Values in a Postmetaphysical Age: Studies on Exclusion and Social Integration in Feminist Theory and Contemporary Philosophy. Axia Academic Publishers. pp. 38-89.
    In the following study the author goes back to the beginnings of the Women's Rights movements in order to pose the question on gender equality by approaching it through the prism of language as a powerful tool in human rights battles. This permits her to show the deep interrelation between women's struggle for recognition and some particular women rights, like the "feminization" of professional titles and the implementation of a gender sensitive language. Hence she argues the thesis that even in (...)
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  36. On a Neglected Argument in French Philosophy: Sceptical Humanism in Montaigne, Voltaire and Camus.Matthew Sharpe - 2015 - Critical Horizons 16 (1):1-26.
    This paper wants to draw out a common argument in three great philosophers and littérateurs in modern French thought: Michel de Montaigne, Voltaire, and Albert Camus. The argument makes metaphysical and theological scepticism the first premise for a universalistic political ethics, as per Voltaire's: “it is clearer still that we ought to be tolerant of one another, because we are all weak, inconsistent, liable to fickleness and error.” The argument, it seems to me, presents an interestingly overlooked, deeply important and (...)
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  37. Way Too Cool: Selling Out Race and Ethics.Shannon Winnubst - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    Life, liberty, and the pursuit of cool have informed the American ethos since at least the 1970s. Whether we strive for it in politics or fashion, cool is big business for those who can sell it across a range of markets and media. Yet the concept wasn't always a popular commodity. Cool began as a potent aesthetic of post-World War II black culture, embodying a very specific, highly charged method of resistance to white supremacy and the globalized exploitation of capital. (...)
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  38. Allison Weir. Identities and Freedom: Feminist Theory Between Power and Connection. [REVIEW]Amy Allen - 2014 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 4 (2):250-255.
  39. Claiming Kant for Feminism: A Discussion of Anderson's Re-Visioning Gender in Philosophy of Religion.Sherah Bloor - 2014 - Sophia 53 (2):299-303.
    I wish to expose the possibility of a Kantian feminism made actual by Pamela Sue Anderson’s recent book Re-visioning Gender in Philosophy of Religion: Reason, Love and Epistemic Locatedness. In this paper I show how Kantian philosophy structures Anderson’s project, and I argue that in embodying the spirit of Kantian critique, this project may be used to turn that spirit against the letter of its expression in an act that would claim Kant for feminism.
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  40. Feministische Religionsphilosophie – ein innovatives Projekt.Brigitte Buchhammer - 2014 - Labyrinth: An International Journal for Philosophy, Value Theory and Sociocultural Hermeneutics 16 (2):66-91.
    Feminist Philosophy of Religion – an innovative Project -/- This essay seeks to launch a systematic basis for a feminist philosophy of religion. The critical thrust is explained with reference to latent sexism in a great part of the traditional philosophy of religion, with reference to Vatican documents, which are marked by perceptions and observations that have resulted in an attitude of discrimination against women. Furthermore, many theories in the field of feminist theology are flawed by argumentative deficiencies as well. (...)
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  41. The Poetry of Habit: Beauvoir and Merleau-Ponty on Aging Embodiment.Helen A. Fielding - 2014 - In Silvia Stoller (ed.), Simone de Beauvoir’s Philosophy of Age: Gender, Ethics. DeGruyter Publishers69-81. pp. 69-82.
    As people age their actions often become entrenched—we might say they are not open to the new; they are less able to adapt; they are stuck in a rut. Indeed, in The Coming of Age (La Vieillesse) Simone de Beauvoir writes that to be old is to be condemned neither to freedom nor to meaning, but rather to boredom (Beauvoir 1996, 461; 486). While in many ways a very pessimistic account of ageing, the text does provide promising moments where her (...)
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  42. Why Race and Gender Still Matter: An Intersectional Approach.Namita Goswami, Maeve M. O'Donavan & Lisa Yount (eds.) - 2014 - Pickering & Chatto.
    Intersectionality, the attempt to bring theories on race, gender, disability and sexuality together, has existed for decades as a theoretical framework. The essays in this volume explore how intersectionality can be applied to modern philosophy, as well as looking at other disciplines.
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  43. No Failure: Climate Change, Radical Hope, and Queer Crip Feminist Eco-Future.Kim Q. Hall - 2014 - Radical Philosophy Review 17 (1):203-225.
    This paper offers a critique of the emphasis on anti-futurity and failure prevalent in contemporary queer theory. I argue that responsibility for climate change requires commitments to futures that are queer, crip, and feminist. A queer crip feminist commitment to the future is, I contend, informed by radical hope.
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  44. Buddhist Responses to Globalization.Peter D. Hershock, Carolyn M. Jones Medine, Ugo Dessi, Melanie L. Harris, John W. M. Krummel & Erin McCarthy - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    This interdisciplinary collection of essays highlights the relevance of Buddhist doctrine and practice to issues of globalization. From philosophical, religious, historical, and political perspectives, the authors show that Buddhism—arguably the world’s first transnational religion—is a rich resource for navigating todays interconnected world.
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  45. Gender, Age, and Passivity Comment on Penelope Deutscher.Ulrike Kadi - 2014 - In Silvia Stoller (ed.), Simone de Beauvoir's Philosophy of Age: Gender, Ethics, and Time. De Gruyter. pp. 43-46.
  46. La Femme Et Sa Destinée d'Après Edith Stein.Philippe Lauria - 2014 - Labyrinthe 16 (2):92-99.
    Woman's Destiny according Edith Stein -/- The following essay aims to show that Edith Stein's conception of women was a feminist and a traditionalist one. This could be interpreted by some philosophers as a sort of contradiction. Thus the author presents the different arguments detecting such a conflict between feminism and traditionalism. These arguments are based in fact on the opposition between nature or essence, on the one hand, and freedom, on the other hand. The thesis of the author is (...)
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  47. Interpreting Intouchables: Competing Transnationalisms in Contemporary French Cinema.Charlie Michael - 2014 - Substance 43 (1):123-137.
    The main publicity poster for Olivier Nakache’s and Eric Toledano’s recent film Intouchables (The Intouchables [2011]) features two men side-by-side, grinning ear-to-ear. The image is oddly difficult to interpret. For French cinema initiates, the contrast should be striking. Seated to the left is François Cluzet, long one of the France’s more versatile leading actors; huddled over him on the right is Omar Sy, a French-born comedian of Senegalese and Mauritanian descent who, prior to playing this role, was largely unknown to (...)
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  48. Head Cases: Julia Kristeva on Philosophy and Art in Depressed Times.Elaine P. Miller - 2014 - Columbia University Press.
    Focusing on specific artworks that illustrate KristevaÕs ideas, from ancient Greek tragedy to early photography, contemporary installation art, and film, Miller positions creative acts as a form of Òspiritual inoculationÓ against the ...
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  49. Investing in a Third: Colonization, Religious Fundamentalism, and Adolescence.Elaine P. Miller - 2014 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 22 (2):36-45.
    In her keynote address to the Kristeva Circle 2014, Julia Kristeva argued that European Humanism dating from the French Revolution paradoxically paved the way for “those who use God for political ends” by promoting a completely and solely secular path to the political. As an unintended result of this movement this path has led, in the late 20 th and early 21 st centuries, to the development of a new form of nihilism that masks itself as revolutionary but in fact (...)
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  50. Motherhood and the Machine.Miglena Nikolchina - 2014 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 22 (2):62-69.
    In her conceptualization of the human as defined by the capacity for revolt Kristeva unavoidably touches upon issues of robotization, technology, and the virtual. The concepts of animal and machine, however, although they do appear occasionally and in important ways, are never at the focus of her inquiries and are absent in her “New Forms of Revolt.” Yet these two concepts to a large extent define the field of contemporary philosophical debates of the human giving rise to three major theoretical (...)
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