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  1. Ix.—Correspondence.A. E. -Taylor - 1916 - Mind 25 (4):551-552.
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  2. Correspondence.O. P. A. - 1915 - The Classical Review 29 (03):95-.
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  3. The Correspondence Theory of Truth.H. B. Acton - 1934 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 35:177 - 194.
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  4. X.—The Correspondence Theory of Truth.H. B. Acton - 1934 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 35 (1):177-194.
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  5. Conceptions of Truth.Ken Akiba - 2004 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (3):525 – 527.
    Book Information Conceptions of Truth. Conceptions of Truth Wolfgang Künne , Oxford : Clarendon Press , 2003 , xiii + 493 , £50.00 ( cloth ) By Wolfgang Künne. Clarendon Press. Oxford. Pp. xiii + 493. £50.00 (cloth:).
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  6. Correspondence.W. H. Alexander - 1933 - The Classical Review 47 (04):153-.
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  7. Correspondence.L. H. Allen - 1912 - The Classical Review 26 (06):206-.
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  8. A Realist Conception of Truth.William P. Alston - 1996 - Cornell University Press.
    William P. Alston formulates and defends a realist conception of truth, which he calls alethic realism (from "aletheia", Greek for "truth").
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  9. Correspondence Via the Backdoor and Other Stories.Peter Alward - 2003 - Disputatio 14 (14):1 - 19.
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  10. Correspondence Via the Backdoor and Other Stories.Peter Alward - 2003 - Disputatio 14 (1):3-21.
    Much has been written of late concerning the relative virtues and views of correspondence and deflationary theories of Truth. What is troubling, however, is that it is not always entirely clear exactly what distinguishes different conceptions of truth. Characterizations of the distinction are often vague and sometimes vary from writer to writer. One central thing I want to do here is to diagnose the source of the difficulty in providing a clear characterization of the distinction. In light of this diagnosis, (...)
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  11. Correspondence.David Archard - 1981 - Radical Philosophy 27:51.
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  12. Sellars and Pretense on "Truth & 'Correspondence'".Bradley Armour-Garb & James A. Woodbridge - 2012 - Discusiones Filosóficas 13 (21):33-63.
    In this paper, we show how an internal tension in Wilfrid Sellars’s understanding of truth, as well as an external tension in his account of meaning attribution, can be resolved while adhering to a Sellarsian spirit, by appealing to the particular fictionalist accounts of truth-talk and proposition-talk that we have developed elsewhere.
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  13. Correspondence.Angus Armstrong & Maud Bodkin - 1940 - Philosophy 15 (59):334 - 335.
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  14. Correspondence.Chris Arthur - 1982 - Radical Philosophy 30:51.
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  15. Truth and Correspondence in Mathematics.Merrilee Hollenkamp Ashby - 1970 - Dissertation, University of Michigan
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  16. Pragmatic Scruples and the Correspondence Theory of Truth.Richard Kenneth Atkins - 2010 - Dialogue 49 (3):365-380.
    ABSTRACT: Cheryl Misak has offered a pragmatic argument against a position she calls Scientific transcendentalists hold that truth is something different from what would be believed at the end of inquiry; more specifically, they adhere to a correspondence theory of truth. Misak thinks scientific transcendentalists thereby undermine the connection between truth and inquiry, for (a) pragmatically speaking, it adds nothing to truth and inquiry to ask whether what would be the results of sufficiently rigorous inquiry are really true and (b) (...)
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  17. Unfair to Facts.J. L. Austin - 1961 - In J. O. Urmson & G. J. Warnock (eds.), Philosophical Papers. Clarendon Press.
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  18. Truth.J. L. Austin - 1950 - Aristotelian Society Supp 24 (1):111--29.
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  19. Correspondence.N. W. Ayles - 1954 - Philosophy 29 (108):95.
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  20. Elements of a Realist Conception of Truth.Frederic Lewis Backfield - 1983 - Dissertation, University of Virginia
    The major assumption in my thesis is that truth is objective. This I characterize as the invariance of a claim's truth-value among people. The objectivity thesis is grounded in the correspondence 'theory' of truth, which in regard to the physical world is essentially the idea that truth is dependent upon the existence of mind-independent objects. Obviously ontological realism must incorporate this position. Various philosophers, including Putnam and Rorty, have suggested the idea of objects logically independent of experience leads to scepticism (...)
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  21. Correspondence.D. R. Shackleton Bailey - 1981 - The Classical Review 31 (02):333-.
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  22. Correspondence.F. E. Balderston & Thomas Walsh - 1971 - Minerva 9 (3):414-417.
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  23. Correspondence.G. H. Bantock & Maurice Bruce - 1953 - British Journal of Educational Studies 2 (1):94 - 96.
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  24. Correspondence.E. Phillips Barker - 1932 - The Classical Review 46 (04):188-189.
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  25. Truth as Mediated Correspondence.Robert Barnard & Terence Horgan - 2006 - The Monist 89 (1):28-49.
    We will here describe a conception of truth that is robust rather than deflationist, and that differs in important ways from the most familiar robust conceptions.' We will argue that this approach to truth is intrinsically and intuitively plausible, and fares very well relative to other conceptions of truth in terms of comparative theoretical benefits and costs.
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  26. Truth, Correspondence, and Gender.Robert Barnard & Joseph Ulatowski - 2013 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 4 (4):621-638.
    Philosophical theorizing about truth manifests a desire to conform to the ordinary or folk notion of truth. This practice often involves attempts to accommodate some form of correspondence. We discuss this accommodation project in light of two empirical projects intended to describe the content of the ordinary conception of truth. One, due to Arne Naess, claims that the ordinary conception of truth is not correspondence. Our more recent study is consistent with Naess’ result. Our findings suggest that contextual factors and (...)
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  27. Facts, Propositions, Exemplification and Truth.C. A. Baylis - 1948 - Mind 57 (228):459-479.
  28. Andrew Newman, The Correspondence Theory of Truth: An Essay on the Metaphysics of Predication Reviewed By.James R. Beebe - 2003 - Philosophy in Review 23 (3):195-197.
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  29. Introduction.Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd - 2005 - In Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd (eds.), Truthmakers: The Contemporary Debate. Clarendon Press.
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  30. Truthmakers: The Contemporary Debate.Helen Beebee & Julian Dodd (eds.) - 2005 - Clarendon Press.
    This volume will be the starting point for future discussion and research.
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  31. Correspondence.A. J. Bell - 1925 - The Classical Review 39 (3-4):95-.
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  32. Correspondence.R. Stephen Berry - 1971 - Minerva 9 (4):565-567.
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  33. Correspondence.Wm H. Birch - 1948 - New Blackfriars 29 (345):576-576.
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  34. Truth: A Guide.Simon Blackburn - 2005 - Oxford University Press.
    The author of the highly popular book Think, which Time magazine hailed as "the one book every smart person should read to understand, and even enjoy, the key questions of philosophy," Simon Blackburn is that rara avis--an eminent thinker who is able to explain philosophy to the general reader. Now Blackburn offers a tour de force exploration of what he calls "the most exciting and engaging issue in the whole of philosophy"--the age-old war over truth. The front lines of this (...)
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  35. Truth.Simon Blackburn & Keith Simmons (eds.) - 1999 - Oxford University Press.
    This volume is designed to set out some of the central issues in the theory of truth. It draws together, for the first time, the debates between philosophers who favor 'robust' or 'substantive' theories of truth, and those other, 'deflationist' or minimalists, who deny that such theories can be given. The editors provide a substantial introduction, in which they look at how the debates relate to further issues, such as the Liar paradox and formal truth theories.
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  36. Correspondence.Ralph Blunden & Alan J. Holland - 1986 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 3 (1):145-148.
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  37. On the Neurobiology of Truth.Ron Bombardi - 2013 - Biosemiotics 6 (3):537-546.
    The concept of truth arises from puzzling over distinctions between the real and the apparent, while the origin of these distinctions lies in the neurobiology of mammalian cerebral lateralization, that is, in the evolution of brains that can address the world both indicatively and subjunctively; brains that represent the world both categorically and hypothetically. After some 2,500 years of thinking about it, the Western philosophical tradition has come up with three major theories of truth: correspondence, coherence, and pragmatist. Traditional philosophy (...)
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  38. Correspondence.A. R. Bonus - 1932 - The Classical Review 46 (04):189-.
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  39. The Correspondence Theory of Truth.James M. Brown - 1976 - Philosophical Studies 25:338-340.
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  40. Correspondence.F. S. Burnell - 1948 - The Classical Review 62 (02):94-.
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  41. Correspondence.C. Burns - 1950 - New Blackfriars 31 (363):292-292.
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  42. Correspondence.R. G. Bury - 1921 - The Classical Review 35 (3-4):81-.
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  43. Correspondence.S. H. Butcher - 1910 - The Classical Review 24 (05):165-.
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  44. Meaning and Truth - Investigations in Philosophical Semantics.Joseph K. Campbell, Michael O'Rourke & David Shier (eds.) - 2002 - Seven Bridges Press.
  45. Correspondence.Norman R. Campbell - 1931 - Philosophy 6 (24):525-.
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  46. Intentionality and Truth-Making: Augustine's Influence on Burley and Wyclif 's Propositional Semantics.Laurent Cesalli - 2007 - Vivarium 45 (s 2-3):283-297.
    Walter Burley (1275-c.1344) and John Wyclif (1328-1384) follow two clearly stated doctrinal options: on the one hand, they are realists and, on the other, they defend a correspondence theory of truth that involves specific correlates for true propositions, in short: truth-makers. Both characteristics are interdependent: such a conception of truth requires a certain kind of ontology. This study shows that a) in their explanation of what it means for a proposition to be true, Burley and Wyclif both develop what we (...)
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  47. An Undecidable Problem in Correspondence Theory.L. A. Chagrova - 1991 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 56 (4):1261-1272.
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  48. On Alethic Functionalism’s (Absurdly?) Wide Applicability.Marc Champagne - 2016 - Teorema: International Journal of Philosophy 35 (2):29-39.
    Alethic functionalism, as propounded by Michael Lynch, is the view that there are different ways to be true, but that these differences nevertheless contain enough unity to forestall outright pluralism. This view has many virtues. Yet, since one could conceivably apply Lynch’s “one and many” strategy to other debates, I try to show how his argumentative steps can be used to solve — not just the controversy pertaining to truth — but any controversy that surrounds a “What is X?” question.
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  49. Correspondence.R. W. Chapman - 1912 - The Classical Review 26 (01):38-.
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  50. Truth.Wrenn Chase - 2014 - Polity.
    What is truth? Is there anything that all truths have in common that makes them true rather than false? Is truth independent of human thought, or does it depend in some way on what we believe or what we would be justified in believing? In what sense, if any, is it better for beliefs or statements to be true than to be false? In this engaging and accessible new introduction Chase Wrenn surveys a variety of theories of the nature of (...)
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