Creation

Edited by Daniel Von Wachter (International Academy of Philosophy In The Principality of Liechtenstein)
About this topic
Summary The belief that God created the universe is generally taken to be a part, or an implication, of theism, i.e. the view that there is a God in the sense (roughly) of a person who is bodiless, omnipotent, omniscient, and perfectly good. The theistic religions, Christianity, Islam, and Judaism, generally teach that God brought a universe into being when there was none and that he sustains it. Both claims are usually taken to be aspects of creation, but some authors deny one or the other. There is much debate about whether God some time after having brought the universe into being intervened in order to create further things within the universe.
Key works Swinburne 1977 spells out what it means that God is a person who can act and is omnipotent. Plantinga 2011 defends some traditional Christian views about creation, Ruse 2012 defends atheistic evolution. Russell et al 2002 (as well as the other 4 volumes of this series) and Shults et al 2009, whose authors are linked to the ‘Divine Action Project’ DAP, spell out creation on the assumption that God never intervenes.
Introductions  Pennock & Ruse 1988
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  1. Where Human and Divine Intimacy Meet: An Insight Into the Theodicy of Marilyn McCord Adams.Ionut Untea - 2020 - Sophia 59 (3):525-547.
    Marilyn McCord Adams’s perspective on the intimacy with God as a way of defeating horrendous evils in the course of a human being’s existence has been met with a series of objections in contemporary scholarship. This is due to the fact that the critiques formulated have focused more on the debilitating impact of suffering on the sufferer’s body and mind, on intimacy as mere intermittent relationships between God and humans, or on what is lost or gained from the presence or (...)
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  2. Is Thomas Aquinas's Account of Creation Compatible with Contemporary Science?Brandon Zimmerman - 2020 - The Australasian Catholic Record 97 (3):320.
    Zimmerman, Brandon Q: Is Thomas Aquinas's account of creation compatible with the account of the natural world given by the contemporary empirical sciences?
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  3. Response to “Mere Theistic Evolution”.William Lane Craig - 2020 - Philosophia Christi 22 (1):55-61.
    Murray and Churchill argue correctly that theistic evolution as they define it is theologically compatible with orthodox Christian doctrines concerning divine providence, natural theology, miracles, and immaterial souls. I close with some reflections on mutual misunderstandings of Intelligent Design proponents and theistic evolutionists that arise because each sees the other as a distorted mirror image of himself.
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  4. Book Review of Christopher J. Insole's Kant and the Creation of Freedom. [REVIEW]Stephen R. Palmquist - 2016 - Philosophy in Review 37:14-16.
  5. Editorial preface.R. L. Hall - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 88 (1):1-3.
  6. Tertullian on Divine Sovereignty and Free Will.David Clark - 2019 - Philosophy and Theology 31 (1):3-19.
    Christian thinkers in the patristic era were not reluctant to integrate classical philosophy with biblical theology as they addressed the seeming incompatibility of free will and determinism. This paper compares and contrasts Tertullian and the Stoics as they explain three issues relating to freedom and fate: 1) The operation of the Logos, 2) Theological Anthropology, and 3) Teleology. While in agreement with the Stoics on several key points, Tertullian crucially departs from them as he argues it is not by necessity—but (...)
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  7. Classical theism and the multiverse.Katherin A. Rogers - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 88 (1):23-39.
    Some analytic philosophers of religion argue that theists should embrace the hypothesis of the multiverse to address the problem of evil and make the concept of a “best possible creation” plausible. I discuss what classical theists, such as Augustine, Anselm, and Aquinas, might make of the multiverse hypothesis including issues such as: the principle of plenitude, what a classical theist multiverse could look like, and how a classical theist multiverse could deal with the problem of evil and the question of (...)
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  8. Личносна димензија времена (Personalistic Dimension of Time).Aleksandar Djakovac - 2017 - Crkvene Studije 14 (1):97-111.
    У античкој философској традицији, време је поимано као кинетичка просторност. Св. Августин задржава овакво поимање времена али га такође одређује и као памћење и очекивање, који означују сопство као место пресека вечног и пролазног, које он дефинише као временски простор. Св. Максим Исповедник, ослањајући се на Кападокијске Оце, даје одлучујући допринос конституисању нарочитог хришћанског схватања времена и просторности, сагледавајући га у контексту есхатолошке персоналности. Творевина треба да превазиђе временску и просторну интервалност која истовремено представља услов могућности промене начина постојања творевине (...)
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  9. Evil and Divine Sovereignty.Jeff Jordan - forthcoming - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-14.
    Since at least the tenth century, some theists have argued that God’s sovereignty as creator exempts God from moral evaluation, and so any argument employing moral principles or the idea of God as morally perfect is fallacious. In particular, any argument contending that the occurrence of pointless evil presents strong evidence against the existence of God is flawed, as God morally owes his creation nothing. This appeal to divine sovereignty, however, fails to rescue any theistic tradition proclaiming that God loves (...)
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  10. Natalja Deng, God and Time.R. Keith Loftin - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (2):459-461.
  11. Paul Copan and William Lane Craig, Eds., The Kalām Cosmological Argument.Graham Oppy - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (2):445-449.
  12. Does Open Theism Explain God’s Planning of Creation?Elliott R. Crozat - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (2):407-417.
    In this essay, I assess Timothy Blank’s “The Open Theistic Multiverse.” In his article, Blank attempts to show that Open Theism explains how God can plan the creation of a multiverse containing creatures with libertarian freedom. I underscore some benefits of Blank’s article while arguing that, despite its strengths, his paper fails to provide a sufficient explanation of God’s precreational planning.
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  13. The Neo-Molinist Square Stands Firm: A Rejoinder to Kirk MacGregor.Elijah Hess - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (2):391-406.
    In a previous issue of Philosophia Christi, Kirk MacGregor responded to an essay of mine in which I argued for a neo-Molinist account of open theism. The argument demonstrated how, given standard counterfactual semantics, one could derive an “open future square of opposition,” that is, a depiction of the logical relations that hold between future-tense statements from an open theistic standpoint. Conceding the validity of the argument, MacGregor nevertheless sought to deny its soundness by criticizing both its conclusion and the (...)
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  14. Optimistic Molinism.Andre Leo Rusavuk - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (2):371-387.
    Some Molinists claim that a perfectly good God would actualize a world that is salvifically optimal, that is, a world in which the balance between the saved and damned is optimal and cannot be improved upon without undesirable consequences. I argue that given some plausible principles of rationality, alongside the assumptions Molinists already accept, God’s perfect rationality necessarily would lead him to actualize a salvifically optimal world; I call this position “Optimistic Molinism.” I then consider objections and offer replies, concluding (...)
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  15. Editor’s Introduction.Ross D. Inman - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (2):251-251.
  16. De Ciuitate Dei I in Light of Seneca's De Prouidentia.Patricio Domínguez Valdés - 2018 - Heythrop Journal.
  17. 'God' the Name.Earl Stanley Bragado Fronda - 2020 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 12 (1):91.
    The word ‘God’ is typically thought to be a proper name, a name of a defined entity. From another position it appears to be a description that is fundamentally synonymous to ‘the first of all causes’, or ‘the font et origo of the structure of possibilities’, or ‘the provenience of being’, or ‘the generator of existence’. This lends credence to the view that ‘God’ is a truncated definite description. However, this article proposes that ‘God’ is a name given to whatever (...)
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  18. More Than a Person.Matthias Remenyi - 2020 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 12 (1):43.
    The question whether God should be thought of as personal or a-personal is closely linked to the issue of an appropriate model of God-world relation on the one hand and the question how to conceive divine action on the other hand. Starting with a discussion of the scientific character of theology, this article critically examines the univocal-personal concept of God. Traditional Christian conceptions of God have, however, always acknowledged a radical asymmetry between the personal existence of created beings and the (...)
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  19. A Methodological Investigation on Christian Natural Theology.Chulho Youn - 2020 - Neue Zeitschrift für Systematicsche Theologie Und Religionsphilosophie 62 (1):41-57.
    Summary The purpose of this article is to present a desirable understanding of Christian natural theology in terms of methodology. In the Enlightenment era, natural theology was understood as that which provides support for religious beliefs by starting from a premise that does not include any religious beliefs. The natural theology of this age was performed under the premise that humanity could prove God’s existence by universal reason without the revelation of God, and that everyone could reasonably agree with the (...)
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  20. Angels in the Areopagetic Tradition.Christos Terezis & Lydia Petridou - 2019 - Augustinianum 59 (2):505-522.
    In this article, we deal with the intelligible world of the angels in the Areopagetic tradition and we compose references found in the De divinis nominibus to form, as far as possible, a complete definition of them. This systematic approach to the Areopagetic corpus takes into consideration Pseudo-Dionysius the Areopagite’s text and George Pachymeres’ Paraphrasis of this treatise. We also offer a methodological proposal on how we can structure theoretically general concepts that refer to objective realities, which however cannot be (...)
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  21. Evil and the god of indifference.László Bernáth & Daniel Kodaj - forthcoming - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-14.
    The evidential problem of evil involves a rarely discussed challenge, namely the challenge of defending theism against the hypothesis of a morally indifferent creator. Our argument uses a Bayesian framework and it starts by showing that if the only alternative to classical theism is naturalistic atheism, then fine-tuning can render theism virtually certain, even in the face of evil. But if the alternatives include the hypothesis of a morally indifferent creator, theism is defeated even if the fine-tuning premise is accepted. (...)
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  22. Editorial preface.R. L. Hall - 2020 - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion 87 (2):135-136.
  23. Theistic Evolution, Intelligent Design, and the Charge of Deism.Robert Larmer - 2018 - Philosophia Christi 20 (2):415-428.
    Christians who are theistic evolutionists and Christians who are proponents of intelligent design very frequently criticize one another on the basis that the other’s position is theologically suspect. Ironically, both camps have accused the other of being deistic and thus sub-Christian in their understanding of God’s relation to creation. In this paper, I consider the merit of these charges. I conclude that, although each position has both deistic and nondeistic forms, theistic evolution in its treatment of life’s history is typically (...)
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  24. The Imago Dei and Blaise Pascal’s Abductive Anthropological Argument.Jonathan Mark Threlfall - 2018 - Philosophia Christi 20 (2):379-400.
    Blaise Pascal argued abductively for Christianity by presenting Christian anthropology as the best explanation for the existential paradoxes of human greatness and wretchedness. Surprisingly, however, the doctrine of the imago Dei never surfaces in his Pensées. I argue that considerations arising from the doctrine of the imago Dei strengthen Pascal’s abductive argument by providing more details for and encompassing more instances of humans’ paradoxical duality. Specifically, the imago Dei helps explain the existential paradoxes of happiness and misery, certainty and uncertainty, (...)
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  25. A Meaning to Life. By Michael Ruse. Pp. Ix, 149, NY, Oxford University Press, 2019, $14.49. [REVIEW]Timb D. Hoswell - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (2):357-358.
    Does human life have any meaning? Does the question even make sense today? For centuries, the question of the meaning or purpose of human life was assumed by scholars and theologians to have a religious answer: life has meaning because humans were made in the image of a good god. In the 19th century, however, Charles Darwin's theory of evolution changed everything-and the human organism was seen to be more machine than spirit. Ever since, with the rise of science and (...)
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  26. Understanding Moral Sentiments: Darwinian Perspectives? Edited by Hilary Putnam, Susan Neiman and Jeffrey P. Schloss. Pp. 273, Transaction Publishers, New Brunswick and London, 2014, $54.95/£47.17. [REVIEW]Benjamin Murphy - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (2):356-357.
  27. Cognitive Science, Continuous Creation, and Zygon Moving On.Arthur C. Petersen - 2020 - Zygon 55 (1):3-5.
  28. The Concept of Continuous Creation Part I: History and Contemporary Use.Fabien Revol - 2020 - Zygon 55 (1):229-250.
    The concept of continuous creation is now widely used in the context of reflections on the dialogue between science and religion. The first part of this research work seeks to understand its meaning through a twofold elaboration: (1) the historical setting of the three philosophical trends in which this concept was developed: scholastic (conservation), Cartesian (conservation through repetition of the creative act at each instant), and dynamic (interpreting the emergence of radical and contingent novelty in nature as a sign of (...)
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  29. Hunky Panentheism.Roberto Rodighiero - 2019 - Sophia 58 (4):581-596.
    Panentheism, a frequently discussed view in recent theological debate, claims that the world is ‘in God’ but that God is ‘more than’ the world. Different theories of the structure of the world produce distinct panentheist views. According to the hunky structure, the world is composed of an infinite number of layers and lacks an ungrounded level. To depict this model, I employ the concepts of ‘grounding’ and ‘emergence.’ The outcome is that if the world is hunky and material reality emerges (...)
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  30. Humus and Sky Gods: Partnership and Post/Humans in Genesis 2 and the Chthulucene.Scott Midson - 2019 - Sophia 58 (4):689-698.
    The relationship between humans and animals is a contentious issue in a range of disciplines. In theology, stories of creation tend to indicate a sense of human difference from animals, as humans are made in the image of God and are given ‘dominion’ over their fellow creatures. Donna Haraway has picked up on the ethical ramifications of these mythologies by critiquing them in her latest book detailing the ‘chthulucene’, which contains her proposals for responsible co-living with other species. But in (...)
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  31. Where, Not When, Did the Cosmos ‘Begin’?Nathan Eric Dickman - forthcoming - Sophia:1-15.
    I examine a tension between temporal and spatial conceptualization of the genesis of the cosmos to show how chronological characterization of ‘beginnings’ occludes ontological interpretation of our existential orientations, to help my audience distinguish symbolic expressions of wonder that the cosmos exists from explanations for it. I bring together resources from multiple intellectual and religious traditions to perform a philosophy of religions that goes beyond the narrowness, intellectualism, and insularity of institutionalized philosophy of religion. I turn to Ibn Rushd, Tillich, (...)
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  32. God, Creation, and Salvation. Studies in Reformed Theology.Oliver Crisp - 2020 - Bloomsbury.
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  33. Is There a Problem of Creatio Ex Nihilo? A Reply to Pao-Shen Ho.Jacobus Erasmus - forthcoming - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-4.
    Pao-Shen Ho attempts to argue that the Christian doctrine of _creatio ex nihilo_ violates modal logic and is necessarily false. More precisely, Ho argues that, if God creates the universe out of nothing, then the non-existence of the universe is both possible and impossible, which is logically incoherent. I point out, however, that Ho commits the modal scope fallacy by confusing the scope of necessity in the argument and, therefore, Ho's argument is unsound.
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  34. The modal problem of creatio ex nihilo.Pao-Shen Ho - forthcoming - International Journal for Philosophy of Religion:1-17.
    I first provide an interpretation of the doctrine of creatio ex nihilo based on the Fourth Lateran Council, according to which God creates from nothing if and only if God creates everything except God Himself. I then show that this doctrine entails the modal problem that it is both possible and not possible that there is nothing at all except God, or alternatively, that it is both necessary and not necessary that there is something else besides God. I proceed to (...)
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  35. Teilhard’s Proposition for Peace: Rediscovering the Fire. By Jean Maalouf. Pp. X, 290, Newcastle Upon Tyne, Cambridge Scholars Publishing, $119.95. [REVIEW]Ilia Delio - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (1):203-204.
  36. The Disciplines of Power, the Weight of Love, and the Politics of Necessity: Reading Augustine with Foucault.Jeffrey Morgan - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (1):15-23.
  37. Sent Into Exile: The Divine Call to Practice Diaspora.Marc Tumeinski - 2020 - Heythrop Journal 61 (1):70-81.
    This article explores the understanding of the Church as a creative minority, particularly in connection with the Matthean beatitude of peacemaking. Joseph Cardinal Ratzinger’s description of the Church as a creative minority provides the starting point. This paper investigates the communal, obedient practice of diaspora peacemaking from multiple and overlapping theological perspectives, including Biblical narratives of diaspora and of Babel, a comparison of political exile and critical exile, and diaspora peacemaking as a threefold ministry of the Church (priest, prophet, king). (...)
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  38. On the Beginning of Time: A Reply to Wes Morriston Concerning the Existence of Actual Infinities.Andrew Loke - 2017 - In Paul Copan & William Lane Craig (eds.), The Kalām Cosmological Argument: Criticisms and Defenses. New York, NY, USA:
  39. God and Ultimate Origins: A Novel Cosmological Argument.Andrew Loke - 2017 - 93413 Cham, Germany: Springer Nature.
    This book develops a novel argument which combines the Kalam with the Thomistic Cosmological Argument. It approaches an ongoing dispute concerning whether there is a First Cause of time from a radically new point of view, namely by demonstrating that there is such a First Cause without requiring the controversial arguments against concrete infinities and against traversing an actual infinite (although the book presents original defenses of these arguments as well). This book also develops a novel philosophical argument for the (...)
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  40. How to Distinguish Secondary From Primary Creations? A Leibnizian Elucidation of a Distinction by J.R.R. Tolkien.Jan Levin Propach - 2020 - Hither Shore 14 (1):34-45.
    Tolkien uses the terms “primary creation” and “secondary creation” in his works with reference to divine and human creation respectively. In the first part of this paper, I argue that one criterion to distinguish the former from the latter is their completeness or incompleteness. The primary creation is complete because it is thought of and created by God. The secondary creations like human fictions are incomplete since the human intellect is finite and does not have the capacity to grasp the (...)
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  41. Teilhard, the Six Propositions, and Human Origins: A Response.David Grumett - 2019 - Zygon 54 (4):954-964.
    Recent archival research has uncovered material that usefully explains why the French Jesuit Pierre Teilhard de Chardin was required to remain in China for so long, despite assenting to the Six Propositions. However, the context in Rome, existing narrative evidence, and aspects of the archival evidence make it more likely than not that the Holy Office had a role in his silencing. Proposition 4 advocated monogenism, whereas Teilhard was developing a monophyletic understanding of human origins, which is consistent with recent (...)
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  42. Climate Engineering From Hindu‐Jain Perspectives.Pankaj Jain - 2019 - Zygon 54 (4):826-836.
    Although Indic perspectives toward nature are now well documented, climate engineering discussions seem to still lack the views from Indic or other non‐Western sources. In this article, I will apply some of the Hindu and Jain concepts such as karma, nonviolence (Ahiṃsā ), humility (Vinaya ), and renunciation (Saṃnyāsa ) to analyze the two primary climate geoengineering strategies of solar radiation management (SRM) and carbon dioxide removal (CDR). I suggest that Indic philosophical and religious traditions such as Hinduism, Buddhism, and (...)
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  43. The Development of Modern Deism.Jan van den Berg - 2019 - Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 71 (4):335-356.
  44. Christ the Heart of Creation.Paul Graham - 2019 - Augustinianum 59 (1):283-285.
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  45. Teilhard de Chardin and Pseudo‐Dionysius: Convergent Evolution, Hierarchy and Divine Activity.David O. Brown - forthcoming - Heythrop Journal.
  46. A Critique of the Kalam Cosmological Argument.Paul Draper - 2014 - In Michael C. Rea & Louis P. Pojman (eds.), Philosophy of Religion: An Anthology, 7th edition. Belmont, CA, USA: pp. 189-194.
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  47. Review of P. Copan and Craig, W. The Kalām Cosmological Argument Volume Two: Scientific Evidence for the Beginning of the Universe. [REVIEW]Graham Oppy - 2019 - European Journal for Philosophy of Religion 11 (3):225-229.
    This is a commissioned review of Copan, P. and Craig, W. The Kalām Cosmological Argument Volume Two: Scientific Evidence for the Beginning of the Universe New York: Bloomsbury, US$172.50, ISBN 978-1-50-133587-7.
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  48. The Phenomenological Moral Argument.Jonathan Ashbach - 2019 - Philosophia Christi 21 (1):135-151.
    The moral argument for the existence of God is a popular and rhetorically effective element of natural theology, but both its traditional ontological and epistemological forms rely upon controversial premises. This article proposes a new variant—the phenomenological moral argument, or PMA—that is exclusively empirical in form. The PMA notes several empirical aspects of moral experience that cohere much more naturally with a theistic than with an atheistic account of conscience’s origins. It therefore concludes that divine creation best explains the nature (...)
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  49. Problem's with Aquinas' Third Way.Edward Moad - 2016 - In Robert Arp (ed.), Revisiting Aquinas' Proofs for the Existence of God. Leiden, Netherlands: Brill. pp. 131-140.
    The object of this paper is not arguments from contingency in general, but specifically Aquinas’s ‘Third Way’ as it appears in his Summa Theologica. I will raise three objections to this argument. First, the argument depends on the premise, that if everything were contingent, then there would have been a time during which nothing exists, but this is not self-evident and no argument is given for it here. Secondly, Aquinas tells us that a key premise in this argument, that an (...)
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  50. Johannes Duns Scotus: Abhandlung über das erste Prinzip . Hrsg. und übers. von Wolfgang Kluxen. , Wissenschaftliche Buchgesellschaft Darmstadt 1974, XXV, 261 pp. [REVIEW]Wolf Gewehr - 1976 - Zeitschrift für Religions- Und Geistesgeschichte 28 (4):371-372.
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