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  1. Prison as a Torturous Institution.Jessica Wolfendale - 2020 - Res Philosophica 97 (2):297-324.
    Prison as a Torturous Institution -/- Philosophers working on torture have largely failed to address the widespread use of torture in the U.S. prison system. Drawing on a victim-focused definition of torture, I argue that the U.S. prison system is a torturous institution in which direct torture occurs (the use of solitary confinement) and in which torture is allowed to occur through the toleration of sexual assault of inmates and the conditions of mass incarceration. The use and toleration of torture (...)
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  2. Dilemmas Regarding Returning ISIS Fighters.Trudy Govier & David Boutland - 2020 - Ethics and Global Politics 13 (2):1756562.
  3. Habeas corpus colectivo, legitimación active y ciudadanía.Romina Rekers - 2015 - la Ley 1 (8):715-725.
    Los excesos cometidos en las políticas de seguridad han conducido a una creciente violación de las libertades individuales. Esto ha hecho que sea cada vez más frecuente la interposición de recursos de hábeas corpus por aquellos que ven arbitrariamente afectada su libertad. Una figura jurídica que debería ser de uso excepcional, y en casos de emergencia, se ha vuelto de uso casi cotidiano . Esto no muestra necesariamente una mala utilización del recurso —aunque puede advertirse en algunos casos cierto abuso (...)
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  4. Justicia transicional epistémica (Transitional epistemic justice).Romina Rekers - 2019
    Los movimientos #MeToo de Hollywood, #YoSiTeCreo de España y #MiraComoNosPonemos de Argentina son el punto de partida de una transición promovida por el movimiento feminista. Esta transición está dirigida a una sociedad justa en la que las mujeres no sean víctimas de violación y acoso que, además, quedan impunes. La perpetración de los males que estos movimientos buscan eliminar ha sido posible hasta ahora, entre otras cosas, dado el déficit de credibilidad que afecta a las mujeres que denuncian tales delitos. (...)
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  5. Just Say No (For Now): The Ethics of Illegal Drug Use.Mathieu Doucet - 2017 - Law Ethics and Philosophy 5:9-29.
    The war on drugs is widely criticized as unjust. The idea that the laws prohibiting drugs are unjust can easily lead to the conclusion that those laws do not deserve our respect, so that our only moral reason to obey them flows from a general moral obligation to obey the law, rather than from anything morally troubling about drug use itself. In this paper, I argue that this line of thinking is mistaken. I begin by arguing that the drug laws (...)
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  6. Predictions, Dangerousness, and Retributivism.Thomas Søbirk Petersen - 2014 - Journal of Ethics 18 (2):137-151.
    Through the criminal justice system so-called dangerous offenders are, besides the offence that they are being convicted of and sentenced to, also punished for acts that they have not done but that they are believe to be likely to commit in the future. The aim of this paper is to critically discuss whether some adherents of retributivism give a plausible rationale for punishing offenders more harshly if they, all else being equal, by means of predictions are believed to be more (...)
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  7. Parole and the Moral Self: Moral Change Mitigates Responsibility.Javier Gomez-Lavin & Jesse Prinz - 2019 - Journal of Moral Education 48 (1):65-83.
    Recent studies demonstrate a moral self effect: continuity in moral values is crucial to ascriptions of identity in and over time. Since Locke, personal identity has been referred to as a ‘forensic’ concept, meaning that it plays a role in attributions of moral responsibility. If moral values are crucial to identity over time, then perceived changes in a person’s set of values may reduce responsibility for past deeds. To test this, we examined the moral self effect in parole contexts. In (...)
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  8. Krista K. Thomason, Naked: The Dark Side of Shame and Moral Life, Oxford University Press, 2018.Mark Alfano - forthcoming - Criminal Justice Ethics.
    In Naked, Krista K. Thomason offers a multi-faceted account of shame, covering its nature as an emotion, its positive and negative roles in moral life, its association with violence, and its provocation through invitations to shame, public shaming, and stigmatization. Along the way, she reflects on a range of examples drawn from literature, memoirs, journalism, and her own imagination. She also considers alternative views at length, draws a wealth of important distinctions, and articulates many of the most intuitive objections to (...)
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  9. Punishing with Care: Treating Offenders as Equal Persons in Criminal Punishment.Helen Brown Coverdale - 2013 - Dissertation, The London School of Economics and Political Science
    Most punishment theories acknowledge neither the full extent of the harms which punishment risks, nor the caring practices which punishment entails. Consequently, I shall argue, punishment in most of its current conceptualizations is inconsistent with treating offenders as equals qua persons. The nature of criminal punishment, and of our interactions with offenders in punishment decision-making and delivery, risks causing harm to offenders. Harm is normalized when central to definitions of punishment, desensitizing us to unintended harms and obscuring caring practices. Offenders (...)
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  10. Principio de Lesividad en la cuestión ambiental: el caso Barrio Ituzaingó anexo de la ciudad de Córdoba.Santiago Truccone Borgogno - 2015 - Revista de la Facultad de Derecho: Nueva Serie II (UNC) 2 (6):193-213.
    El presente escrito pretende analizar el principio de lesividad en un concreto ordenamiento legal como es el argentino. Para ello se utilizará al caso “Barrio Ituzaingó anexo de la ciudad de Córdoba”. Se intentarán evaluar los argumentos del tribunal a los fines de dilucidar si son acordes con lo que el ordenamiento constitucional argentino permite. Asimismo, se introducirá un inconveniente -el problema de la no-identidad- el que nos dejará frente a una situación dilemática.
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  11. A Theory of National Reconciliation: Some Insights From Africa (Repr.).Thaddeus Metz - 2018 - In Aleksandar Fatic, Klaus Bachmann & Igor Lyubashenko (eds.), Transitional Justice in Troubled Societies. Rowman & Littlefield International. pp. 213-235.
    Reprint of mildly revised version of a chapter that initially appeared in _Theorizing Transitional Justice_ (2015).
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  12. Pinkerton Short-Circuits the Model Penal Code.Andrew Ingram - 2019 - Villanova Law Review 64 (1):71-99.
    I show that the Pinkerton rule in conspiracy law is doctrinally and morally flawed. Unlike past critics of the rule, I propose a statutory fix that preserves and reforms it rather than abolishing it entirely. As I will show, this accommodates authors like Neil Katyal who have defended the rule as an important crime fighting tool while also fixing most of the traditional problems with it identified by critics like Wayne LaFave. Pinkerton is a vicarious liability rule that makes conspirators (...)
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  13. Borderline Disorder: Medical Personnel and Law Enforcement.Dien Ho, Kenneth Richman & Mark Bigney - 2014 - The Hasting Center: Bioethics Forum Essay.
  14. Punishment and Welfare: Defending Offender’s Inclusion as Subjects of State Care.Helen Brown Coverdale - 2018 - Ethics and Social Welfare 12 (2):117-132.
    Many criminal offenders come from disadvantaged backgrounds, which punishment entrenches. Criminal culpability explains some disadvantageous treatment in state-offender interactions; yet offenders remain people, and ‘some mother’s child’, in Eva Kittay’s terms. Offending behaviour neither erases needs, nor fully excuses our responsibility for offenders’ needs. Caring is demanded in principle, recognising the offender’s personhood. Supporting offenders may amplify welfare resources: equipping offenders to provide self-care; to meet caring responsibilities; and enabling offenders’ contribution to shared social life, by providing support and furthering (...)
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  15. Lethe's Law: Justice, Law and Ethics in Reconciliation Edited by Emilios Christodoulidis and Scott Veitch.Adam Gearey - 2003 - Legal Ethics 6 (2):217-221.
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  16. Pride and Prejudice: A Case for Reform of Judicial Recusal Procedure.Gabrielle Appleby & Stephen McDonald - 2017 - Legal Ethics 20 (1):89-114.
    Justice must both be done and be seen to be done. A legal principle designed to give effect to this fundamental proposition is that a judge must not sit to determine a dispute if he or she is biased, or if there exists a reasonable perception that he or she is biased. Across many common law jurisdictions – including the UK, Australia, Canada, New Zealand and many jurisdictions in the United States – the judge in question himself or herself is (...)
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  17. Disgust, Offensiveness and the Law.David Archard - 2008 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (4):314-321.
    abstract Martha Nussbaum's concern is to limit the role that emotions can legitimately play in the definition of the criminal law. She would allow nuisance laws to curtail the occasioning of disgust but only disgust of a certain kind. Problems arise for her account when she extends this analysis to the prevention of offensiveness. Unavoidable is an evaluation of those beliefs subscription to which explains the taking of offence. Hence the principal problem for a liberalism of the kind Nussbaum defends (...)
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  18. Democratic Self‐Determination and the Disenfranchisement of Felons.Andrew Altman - 2005 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 22 (3):263-273.
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  19. Punishment and Reformation: An Historical Sketch of the Rise of the Penitentiary System.Frederick Howard Wines.W. D. Morrison - 1896 - International Journal of Ethics 6 (4):523-526.
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  20. Negotiated Measures: The Institutional Micropolitics of Official Criminal Justice Statistics.Kevin D. Haggerty - 2001 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part A 32 (4):705-722.
    This paper examines some of the background social and institutional practices involved in the production of official statistics about crime and criminal justice. It documents how a host of micropolitical considerations impinge on what studies are conducted, which agencies control official data, and how measures are standardized. The communication of statistical facts is also shown to be influenced by a concern to prospectively manage the political symbolism of popular accounts about crime and criminal justice statistics.
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  21. To Make the Punishment Fit the Crime.Don E. Scheid - 1995 - Ethics 105 (3):667-670.
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  22. Authenticating Expertise: Philosophical and Legal Issues.Jason Borenstein - 2002 - International Journal of Applied Philosophy 16 (1):85-102.
    Our courts are regularly confronted with the claims of expert witnesses. Since experts are permitted to present testimony in the courtroom, we have to assume that judges and juries understand what it means to have expertise and can consistently recognize someone who has it. Yet these assumptions need to be examined, for the legal system probably underestimates the difficulty of identifying expertise. In this paper, several philosophical issues pertaining to expertise will be discussed, including what expertise is, why we rely (...)
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  23. Comment: Race, Crime and Criminal Justice.William B. Waegel - 2006 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 3 (1):137-141.
  24. Breaking the Habit: Aristotle on Recidivism and How a Thoroughly Vicious Person Might Begin to Improve.Audrey L. Anton - 2006 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 13 (2):58-66.
    Aristotle’s virtue ethics can teach us about the relationship between our habits and our actions. Throughout his works, Aristotle explains much about how one may develop a virtuous character, and little about how one might change from one character type to another. In recent years criminal law has been concerned with the issue of recidivism and how our system might reform the criminals we return to society more effectively. This paper considers how Aristotle might say a vicious person could change (...)
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  25. The Case Against Punishment: Retribution, Crime Prevention, and the Law Deirdre Golash New York: New York University Press, 2005, Ix + 219 Pp. [REVIEW]Mane Hajdin - 2007 - Dialogue 46 (2):402-404.
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  26. The Excommunication of Caterpillars: Ethno-Anthropological Remarks on the Trial and Punishment of Animals.P. Mason - 1988 - Social Science Information 27 (2):265-273.
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  27. Emergency Placements in Juvenile Justice: Abandoning the Time for Education.Marc Bessin - 2004 - Social Science Information 43 (3):371-387.
  28. A Précis of Punishment.Thom Brooks - 2015 - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche 5 (1).
    Punishment is a topic of increasing importance for citizens and policy-makers. The same can be said for academic researchers and students. Mass imprisonment has reached record high levels while public confidence is often lacking. New thinking is required urgently to address these challenges. Moreover, there have been several key developments in the philosophy of punishment over the last 20 years absent in leading guides including the communicative theory of punishment, restorative justice and my novel unified theory of punishment. -/- My (...)
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  29. Defending Punishment. Replies to Critics.Thom Brooks - 2015 - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche 5 (1).
    I am very grateful to the contributors for this symposium for their essays on my Punishment book. Each focuses with different elements of my work. Antony Duff examines the definition of punishment in my first few pages. Michelle Madden Dempsey analyses the importance given to coherence in my account and critique of expressivist theories of punishment. Richard Lippke considers my statements about negative retributivism in an important new defence of that approach. I examine each of these in turn below. While (...)
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  30. Punishment and Coherence.Michelle Madden Dempsey - 2015 - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche 5 (1).
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  31. Prison, Punishment and Penance in Late Antiquity.Julia Hillner - 2015 - Cambridge University Press.
    This book traces the long-term genesis of the sixth-century Roman legal penalty of forced monastic penance. The late antique evidence on this penal institution runs counter to a scholarly consensus that Roman legal principle did not acknowledge the use of corrective punitive confinement. Dr Hillner argues that forced monastic penance was a product of a late Roman penal landscape that was more complex than previous models of Roman punishment have allowed. She focuses on invigoration of classical normative discourses around punishment (...)
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  32. The Origin of Punishment.Ellsworth Faris - 1914 - International Journal of Ethics 25 (1):54-67.
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  33. A Study of the Popular Attitude Towards Retributive Punishment.F. C. Sharp & M. C. Otto - 1910 - International Journal of Ethics 20 (3):341-357.
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  34. The Ethics of Corporal Punishment.Henry S. Salt - 1905 - International Journal of Ethics 16 (1):77-88.
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  35. Some Remarks on Punishment.F. H. Bradley - 1894 - International Journal of Ethics 4 (3):269-284.
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  36. Retributivist Arguments Against Presuming Innocence. van Dijk - 2013 - Netherlands Journal of Legal Philosophy 42 (3):249-267.
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  37. XVI.—Some Ambiguities in the Retributive Theory of Punishment.W. H. Moberly - 1924 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 25 (1):289-304.
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  38. VII.—Problems of Punishment.F. J. O. Coddington - 1945 - Proceedings of the Aristotelian Society 46 (1):155-178.
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  39. The Varied Effects of Punishment on Behavior.Russell M. Church - 1963 - Psychological Review 70 (5):369-402.
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  40. Punishment: II. An Interpretation of Empirical Findings.James A. Dinsmoor - 1955 - Psychological Review 62 (2):96-105.
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  41. Justice, Punishment and the Medieval Muslim Imagination * by Christian Lange.C. Edmund Bosworth - 2010 - Journal of Islamic Studies 21 (1):126-128.
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  42. Defending Punishment. Replies to Critics.Gianfranco Pellegrino - forthcoming - Philosophy and Public Issues - Filosofia E Questioni Pubbliche.
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  43. The Criminal Justice System and Health Care.Charles A. Erin & Suzanne Ost (eds.) - 2007 - Oxford University Press.
    This collection examines questions of medical accountability and ethics. It analyses how the criminal justice system regulates health care practice, and to what extent it is appropriate to use it as a tool to resolve ethical conflict in health care.
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  44. South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Light of Ubuntu: A Comprehensive Appraisal.Thaddeus Metz - 2017 - In Mia Swart & Karin van Marle (eds.), The Limits of Transition: The South African Truth and Reconciliation Commission 20 Years on. Brill. pp. 221-252.
    I critically evaluate South Africa’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) in light of a philosophical interpretation of the southern African ethic of ubuntu. Roughly, according to this moral philosophy, an act or policy is right insofar as it honours communal relationships, ones of identifying with others and exhibiting solidarity with them. After spelling out this ethical principle and the specific kind of national reconciliation it prescribes, I show that there is a powerful justification for the TRC’s broad contours as a (...)
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  45. In Defence of Reasonable Doubt.Georgi Gardiner - 2017 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 34 (2):221-241.
    In criminal trials the state must establish, to a particular standard of proof, the defendant's guilt. The most widely used and important standard of proof for criminal conviction is the ‘beyond a reasonable doubt' standard. But what legitimates this standard, rather than an alternative? One view holds the standard of proof should be determined or justified – at least in large part – by its consequences. In this spirit, Laudan uses crime statistics to estimate risks the average citizen runs of (...)
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  46. Jails, Prisons, and Your Community's Health.David Andress, Tara Wildes, Dianne Rechtine & Kenneth P. Moritsugu - 2004 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 32 (4_suppl):50-51.
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  47. Inclusiveness, Effectiveness and Intrusiveness: Issues in the Developing Uses of DNA Profiling in Support of Criminal Investigations.Robin Williams & Paul Johnson - 2006 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 34 (2):234-247.
    The rapid implementation and continuing expansion of forensic DNA databases around the world has been supported by claims about their effectiveness in criminal investigations and challenged by assertions of the resulting intrusiveness into individual privacy. These two competing perspectives provide the basis for ongoing considerations about the categories of persons who should be subject to non-consensual DNA sampling and profile retention as well as the uses to which such profiles should be put. This paper uses the example of the current (...)
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  48. A Study of the Popular Attitude Towards Retributive Punishment.F. C. Sharp & M. C. Otto - 1909 - Ethics 20 (3):341.
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  49. The Ethics of Punishment.Walter Warren Filkins - unknown
    This work was digitized by the Scholarly Communications program staff in the KU Libraries’ Center for Digital Scholarship.
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  50. Willful Ignorance and Self-Deception.Kevin Lynch - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (2):505-523.
    Willful ignorance is an important concept in criminal law and jurisprudence, though it has not received much discussion in philosophy. When it is mentioned, however, it is regularly assumed to be a kind of self-deception. In this article I will argue that self-deception and willful ignorance are distinct psychological kinds. First, some examples of willful ignorance are presented and discussed, and an analysis of the phenomenon is developed. Then it is shown that current theories of self-deception give no support to (...)
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