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  1. Le partage du monde: Husserl et la constitution des animaux comme « autres moi ».Christiane Bailey - 2013 - Chiasmi International 15:219-250.
    While phenomenologists claim to have overcome solipsism, most have not pushed beyond the boundaries of individual human intersubjectivity to that of individuals of other species. Yet Husserl recognizes the existence of an interspecific intersubjectivity, an intersubjectivity beyond the limits of the species. He even goes so far as to say that we sometimes understand a companion animal better than a foreign human. However, even if he admits that many animals are capable of a life of subjective consciousness and live in (...)
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  2. Marx on Humans and Animals.Ted Benton - 1984 - In Sean Sayers & Peter Osborne (eds.), Socialism, Feminism, and Philosophy: A Radical Philosophy Reader. Routledge. pp. 235.
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  3. Encountering the Animal Other: Reflections on Moments of Empathic Seeing.Scott D. Churchill - 2006 - Indo-Pacific Journal of Phenomenology 6 (sup1):1-13.
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  4. The Animal Inside: Essays at the Intersection of Philosophical Anthropology and Animal Studies.Geoffrey Dierckxsens, Rudmer Bijlsma, Michael Begun & Thomas Kiefer (eds.) - 2016 - Rowman & Littlefield International.
    A team of renowned philosophers and a new generation of thinkers come together to offer the first book-length examination of the relationship between philosophical anthropology and animal studies.
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  5. Why Do We Go to the Zoo?: Communication, Animals, and the Cultural-Historical Experience of Zoos.Erik A. Garrett - 2013 - Fairleigh Dickinson University Press.
    This book is a phenomenological investigation of the zoo visit experience. Why Do We Go to the Zoo? is rooted in Husserlian phenomenology and focuses on the communicative interactions between humans and animals in the zoo setting.
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  6. Der Mensch, das Tier. [REVIEW]Kristin Hagen - 2011 - Philosophische Rundschau 58 (2):139 - 157.
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  7. Between Explanation and Understanding: Hermeneutical Circles, Animal Minds and Internal Causes of Behavior.A. M. Karremans & P. Sleurink - unknown
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  8. Why Was Thomas A. Sebeok Not a Cognitive Ethologist? From “Animal Mind” to “Semiotic Self”.Timo Maran - 2010 - Biosemiotics 3 (3):315-329.
    In the current debates about zoosemiotics its relations with the neighbouring disciplines are a relevant topic. The present article aims to analyse the complex relations between zoosemiotics and cognitive ethology with special attention to their establishers: Thomas A. Sebeok and Donald R. Griffin. It is argued that zoosemiotics and cognitive ethology have common roots in comparative studies of animal communication in the early 1960s. For supporting this claim Sebeok’s works are analysed, the classical and philosophical periods of his zoosemiotic views (...)
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  9. The Birth of the Herd.Dimitrij Mlekuž - 2013 - Society and Animals 21 (2):150-161.
    One of the most significant contributions of archaeology to the studies of human-animal relations is the concept of the “domestication” of non-human animals. Domestication is often seen as a specific human-animal relation that explains the ways people and animals interact. However, I argue, that “domestication” does not explain anything but has to be explained or “reassembled” by focusing on the many historically specific ways human and animals live together. Thus, the paper tackles the emergence of a “herd”, an assembly of (...)
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  10. Domesticating Animals: Description of a Certain Disturbance.Szymon Wróbel - 2014 - Dialogue and Universalism 24 (1):173-191.
    In my text, I ask—investigating mainly the works of Freud, Lévi-Strauss, and Kafka—if humanity empowered by kinship or even contamination with other species would be a sick society, frail and ill-selected, or whether it would rather be a society which is active and audacious, devoid of the traces of resentment towards other living beings. I analyze the mono-individual species on the basis of examples which are clinical , literary , and also those borrowed from mass culture in order to illustrate (...)
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  11. From Blubber and Baleen to Buddha of the Deep: The Rise of the Metaphysical Whale.Frank Zelko - 2012 - Society and Animals 20 (1):91-108.
    Human attitudes to various nonhuman animals have varied considerably\nacross cultures and throughout time. While some of our responses are\nundoubtedly instinctive and universal-a visceral fear of large\ncarnivores or the feeling of spontaneous warmth for creatures exhibiting\nhigh degrees of neoteny-it is clear that our attitude toward specific\nspecies is largely shaped by our innate anthropomorphism: that is, when\nwe think about animals, we are also thinking about ourselves. There are\nfew better examples of this than the shifting attitudes toward whales\nand dolphins throughout the 20th century, (...)
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