Cryonics

Edited by Craig Paterson (Complutense University of Madrid)
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  1. Mormonism Mandates Transhumanism.Lincoln Cannon - 2017 - In Tracy Trothen & Calvin Mercer (eds.), Religion and Human Enhancement.
    Mormonism mandates Transhumanism based on four premises that reflect the Mormon authoritative tradition. First, God commands us to use ordained means to participate in God's work. Second, science and technology are among the means ordained of God. Third, God's work is to help each other attain Godhood. And fourth, an essential attribute of Godhood is a glorified immortal body. Thus, God commands us to use science and technology to help each other attain a glorified immortal body, which qualifies as Transhumanism. (...)
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  2. 'Is Cryonics an Ethical Means of Life Extension?'.Rebekah Cron - 2014 - Dissertation, University of Exeter
    This dissertation discusses several ethical and moral issues which arise from the cryonics movement. Within each section, the question is posed: how does that problem impact on how we should think about cryonics? Is cryonics morally permissible and/or morally obligatory? Issues include a consideration of economic resource allocation, bodily ownership and identity.
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  3. Potentiality, Possibility, and the Irreversibility of Death.Jason T. Eberl - 2008 - Review of Metaphysics 62 (1):61-77.
    This paper considers the issue of cryopreservation and the definition of death from an Aristotelian-Thomistic perspective. A central conceptual focus throughout this discussion is the purportedly irreversible nature of death and the criteria by which a human body is considered to be informed by a rational soul. It concludes that a cryopreserved corpse fails to have “life potentially in it” sufficient to satisfy Aristotle’s definition of ensoulment. Therefore, if the possibility that such a corpse may be successfully preserved and resuscitated (...)
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  4. Youniverse: Toward a Self-Centered Philosophy of Immortalism and Cryonics.R. C. W. Ettinger - 2009 - Universal Publishers.
    Youniverse is about you and the way things really are--how to improve your chances of a much longer and more satisfying life.
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  5. Value in Very Long Lives.Preston Greene - 2017 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 14 (4):416-434.
    As things currently stand, our deaths are unavoidable and our lifespans short. It might be thought that these qualities leave room for improvement. According to a prominent line of argument in philosophy, however, this thought is mistaken. Against the idea that a longer life would be better, it is claimed that negative psychological states, such as boredom, would be unavoidable if our lives were significantly longer. Against the idea that a deathless life would be better, it is claimed that such (...)
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  6. Cryoethics.David Shaw - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), International Encyclopaedia of Ethics. Blackwell.
    Cryoethics is a new theme within bioethics (see bioethics) concerned with the ethics of cryonic storage. Cryonics, which is also erroneously referred to as “cryogenic” technology, offers people the option of having their bodies or brain-stems preserved at very low temperatures after death in order to be revived at some point in the future when technology is sufficiently advanced to enable reanimation, and possibly immortality. The main issues in cryoethics center around whether it is ethical to use this technology, and (...)
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  7. Cryoethics: Seeking Life After Death.David Shaw - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (9):515-521.
    Cryonic suspension is a relatively new technology that offers those who can afford it the chance to be 'frozen' for future revival when they reach the ends of their lives. This paper will examine the ethical status of this technology and whether its use can be justified. Among the arguments against using this technology are: it is 'against nature', and would change the very concept of death; no friends or family of the 'freezee' will be left alive when he is (...)
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  8. Forever and Again: Necessary Conditions for “Quantum Immortality” and its Practical Implications.Alexey Turchin - manuscript
    So-called “quantum immortality” should be better called “multiverse immortality,” as it mostly depends on the existence of many copies of the observer in other worlds. We identify two necessary premises when this theory becomes true: the very large size of the Universe (not necessary because of quantum effects), and the copy-friendly theory of the personal identity. We apply decisions under uncertainty to explore the situations in which multiverse immortality could be practically used. We show that, given large uncertainty, the only (...)
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  9. Artificial Intelligence in Life Extension: From Deep Learning to Superintelligence.Alexey Turchin, Denkenberger David, Zhila Alice, Markov Sergey & Batin Mikhail - 2017 - Informatica 41:401.
    In this paper, we focus on the most efficacious AI applications for life extension and anti-aging at three expected stages of AI development: narrow AI, AGI and superintelligence. First, we overview the existing research and commercial work performed by a select number of startups and academic projects. We find that at the current stage of “narrow” AI, the most promising areas for life extension are geroprotector-combination discovery, detection of aging biomarkers, and personalized anti-aging therapy. These advances could help currently living (...)
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