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  1. Mourning the frozen: considering the relational implications of cryonics.Robin Hillenbrink & Christopher Simon Wareham - 2024 - Journal of Medical Ethics 50 (6):388-391.
    Cryonics is the preservation of legally dead human bodies at the temperature of liquid nitrogen in the hope that future technologies will be able to revive them. In philosophical debates surrounding this practice, arguments often focus on prudential implications of cryopreservation, or moral arguments on a societal level. In this paper, we claim that this debate is incomplete, since it does not take into account a significant relational concern about cryonics. Specifically, we argue that attention should be paid to the (...)
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  2. Cryonics: Traps and transformations.Daniel Story - 2024 - Bioethics 38 (4):351-355.
    Cryonics is the practice of cryopreserving the bodies or brains of legally dead individuals with the hope that these individuals will be reanimated in the future. A standard argument for cryonics says that cryonics is prudentially justified despite uncertainty about its success because at worst it will leave you no worse off than you otherwise would have been had you not chosen cryonics, and at best it will leave you much better off than you otherwise would have been. Thus, it (...)
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  3. Dark Cosmism: Or, the Apophatic Specter of Russo-Soviet Techno-utopianism.Taylor R. Genovese - 2023 - Dissertation, Arizona State University
    By utilizing words, photographs, and motion pictures, this multimodal and multisited project traces a rhizomatic genealogy of Russian Cosmism—a nineteenth century political theology promoting a universal human program for overcoming death, resurrecting ancestors, and traveling through the cosmos—throughout post-Soviet techno-utopian projects and imaginaries. I illustrate how Cosmist techno-utopian, futurist, and other-than-human discourse exist as Weberian “elective affinities” within diverse ecologies of the imagination, transmitting a variety of philosophies and political programs throughout trans-temporal, yet philosophically bounded, communities. With a particular focus (...)
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  4. Cryonics, euthanasia, and the doctrine of double effect. [REVIEW]Maria Campo Redondo & Gabriel Andrade - 2023 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 18 (1):1-10.
    In 1989, Thomas Donaldson requested the California courts to allow physicians to hasten his death. Donaldson had been diagnosed with brain cancer, and he desired to die in order to cryonically preserve his brain, so as to stop its further deterioration. This case elicits an important question: is this a case of euthanasia? In this article, we examine the traditional criteria of death, and contrast it with the information-theoretic criterion. If this criterion is accepted, we posit that Donaldson’s case would (...)
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  5. Forever and Again: Necessary Conditions for “Quantum Immortality” and its Practical Implications.Alexey Turchin - 2018 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 28 (1).
    This article explores theoretical conditions necessary for “quantum immortality” (QI) as well as its possible practical implications. It is demonstrated that the QI is a particular case of “multiverse immortality” (MI) which is based on two main assumptions: the very large size of the Universe (not necessary because of quantum effects), and the copy-friendly theory of personal identity. It is shown that a popular objection about the lowering of the world-share (measure) of an observer in the case of QI doesn’t (...)
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  6. Mormonism Mandates Transhumanism.Lincoln Cannon - 2017 - In Tracy J. Trothen & Calvin Mercer (eds.), Religion and Human Enhancement. Cham: Imprint: Palgrave Macmillan.
    Mormonism mandates Transhumanism based on four premises that reflect the Mormon authoritative tradition. First, God commands us to use ordained means to participate in God's work. Second, science and technology are among the means ordained of God. Third, God's work is to help each other attain Godhood. And fourth, an essential attribute of Godhood is a glorified immortal body. Thus, God commands us to use science and technology to help each other attain a glorified immortal body, which qualifies as Transhumanism. (...)
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  7. Artificial Intelligence in Life Extension: from Deep Learning to Superintelligence.Alexey Turchin, Denkenberger David, Zhila Alice, Markov Sergey & Batin Mikhail - 2017 - Informatica 41:401.
    In this paper, we focus on the most efficacious AI applications for life extension and anti-aging at three expected stages of AI development: narrow AI, AGI and superintelligence. First, we overview the existing research and commercial work performed by a select number of startups and academic projects. We find that at the current stage of “narrow” AI, the most promising areas for life extension are geroprotector-combination discovery, detection of aging biomarkers, and personalized anti-aging therapy. These advances could help currently living (...)
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  8. Dying to Live: Transhumanism, Cryonics, and Euthanasia.Adam Buben - 2015 - In Michael Cholbi & Jukka Varelius (eds.), New Directions in the Ethics of Assisted Suicide and Euthanasia. Cham: Springer Verlag. pp. 299-313.
    It might seem counterintuitive to think transhumanists, who are typically characterized by extreme techno-optimism and hope for radical life-extension, would be interested in assisted dying. Because the technological enhancements they long for will probably not be available during their natural lifetimes, many transhumanists at least entertain the idea of having themselves cryonically preserved to buy some additional time for real-world technology to catch up to their dreams. However, since an ideal preservation would take place before serious cellular deterioration sets in, (...)
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  9. 'Is Cryonics an Ethical Means of Life Extension?'.Rebekah Cron - 2014 - Dissertation, University of Exeter
    This dissertation discusses several ethical and moral issues which arise from the cryonics movement. Within each section, the question is posed: how does that problem impact on how we should think about cryonics? Is cryonics morally permissible and/or morally obligatory? Issues include a consideration of economic resource allocation, bodily ownership and identity.
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  10. Cryoethics.David Shaw - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley-Blackwell.
    Cryoethics is a new theme within bioethics (see bioethics) concerned with the ethics of cryonic storage. Cryonics, which is also erroneously referred to as “cryogenic” technology, offers people the option of having their bodies or brain-stems preserved at very low temperatures after death in order to be revived at some point in the future when technology is sufficiently advanced to enable reanimation, and possibly immortality. The main issues in cryoethics center around whether it is ethical to use this technology, and (...)
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  11. Youniverse: toward a self-centered philosophy of immortalism and cryonics.R. C. W. Ettinger - 2009 - Boca Raton, Fla.: Universal Publishers.
    Youniverse is about you and the way things really are--how to improve your chances of a much longer and more satisfying life.
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  12. Cryoethics: Seeking life after death.David Shaw - 2009 - Bioethics 23 (9):515-521.
    Cryonic suspension is a relatively new technology that offers those who can afford it the chance to be 'frozen' for future revival when they reach the ends of their lives. This paper will examine the ethical status of this technology and whether its use can be justified. Among the arguments against using this technology are: it is 'against nature', and would change the very concept of death; no friends or family of the 'freezee' will be left alive when he is (...)
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  13. Potentiality, Possibility, and the Irreversibility of Death.Jason T. Eberl - 2008 - Review of Metaphysics 62 (1):61-77.
    This paper considers the issue of cryopreservation and the definition of death from an Aristotelian-Thomistic perspective. A central conceptual focus throughout this discussion is the purportedly irreversible nature of death and the criteria by which a human body is considered to be informed by a rational soul. It concludes that a cryopreserved corpse fails to have “life potentially in it” sufficient to satisfy Aristotle’s definition of ensoulment. Therefore, if the possibility that such a corpse may be successfully preserved and resuscitated (...)
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  14. Technologies of immortality: the brain on ice.Bronwyn Parry - 2004 - Studies in History and Philosophy of Science Part C: Studies in History and Philosophy of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 35 (2):391-413.
  15. Emergent Illusionism: Rethinking Personal Identity in the Cryonics Conundrum.Shubham Dominic - manuscript
    Science fiction no longer has the same potential due to the fast advancements in science and technology. Scientists have known for a long time that certain species may live for extensive periods of time in a condition that resembles death. The stunning change of the North American Wood Frog throughout the winter months is one fascinating example. Its heart stops beating and its body freezes solid, completely shutting down its whole physiological system at this period. But when summer-time warmth arrives, (...)
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