About this topic
Summary Dai Zhen 戴震 (1724-1777). The most influential Confucian scholar in the Qing dynasty. Also the leading philologist and a contributor of major works on phonology, astronomy and mathematics. Dai developed an alternative to the speculative metaphysics that had come to dominate China after the rise of Buddhism and orthodox Neo-Confucianism. He defended models of moral cultivation and moral agency that prioritized desires, sympathetic perspective-taking, textual analysis, and philosophical reflection.
Key works Dai's most important and comprehensive work is the Evidential Commentary on the Meanings of Terms in the Mengzi (Mengzi ziyi shuzheng 孟子字義疏證). This has been translated by Freeman and Chin in Tai Chen on Mencius (Yale University Press, 1990) and in Ewell 1990. Another major philosophical work is On the Good (Yuanshan 原善), which is translated in Cheng 1971.
Introductions Ivanhoe 2000 (ch. 7), Tiwald 2010Tiwald 2006
Related categories

26 found
Order:
  1. Shared Ends: Kant and Dai Zhen on the Ethical Value of Mutually Fulfilling Relationships.Justin Tiwald - 2020 - Journal of Confucian Philosophy and Culture 33:105-137.
    This paper offers an account of an important type of human relationship: relationships based on shared ends. These are an indispensable part of most ethically worthy or valuable lives, and our successes or failures at participating in these relationships constitute a great number of our moral successes or failures overall. While many philosophers agree about their importance, few provide us with well-developed accounts of the nature and value of good shared-end relationships. This paper begins to develop a positive account of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Two Notions of Empathy and Oneness.Justin Tiwald - 2018 - In Philip J. Ivanhoe, Owen Flanagan, Victoria S. Harrison, Hagop Sarkissian & Eric Schwitzgebel (eds.), The Oneness Hypothesis: Beyond the Boundary of Self. New York, USA: Columbia University Press. pp. 371-387.
    This essay is about the relations between two different types of empathy and two different conceptions of oneness. Roughly, the first type of empathy is what is sometimes called “other-focused” or “imagine-other” empathy, in which one reconstructs the thoughts and feelings that someone else has or would have. The second type, “self- focused” or “imagine-self” empathy, is the sort of emotional attitude someone adopts when she imagines how she would think or feel were she in the other person’s place. Some (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Xunzi Among the Chinese Neo-Confucians.Justin Tiwald - 2016 - In Eric Hutton (ed.), Dao Companion to the Philosophy of Xunzi. Springer. pp. 435-473.
    This chapter explains how Xunzi's text and views helped shape the thought of the Neo-Confucian philosophers, noting and explicating some areas of influence long overlooked in modern scholarship. It begins with a general overview of Xunzi’s changing position in the tradition (“Xunzi’s Status in Neo-Confucian Thought”), in which I discuss Xunzi’s status in three general periods of Neo-Confucian era: the early period, in which Neo-Confucian views of Xunzi were varied and somewhat ambiguous, the “mature” period, in which a broad consensus (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  4. Dai Zhen on Nature and Pattern.Kwong‐Loi Shun - 2014 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 41 (1-2):5-17.
    The article discusses Dai Zhen's views on pattern. For Dai, pattern has to do with ensuring that the means by which one attains one's emotional propensities and satisfies one's desires will not prevent others from doing the same. The heart/mind has the capacity to know pattern on such basis and such knowledge will guide action. Ethical failure is due to a deficiency in knowledge, and self-cultivation involves developing one's capacity to know so that one can grasp the pattern in any (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. A Social Theoretical Interpretation of Dai Zhen's Critique of Neo-Confucianism.Matthew M. Chew - 2012 - Asian Culture and History 4 (2):p22.
    This study analyzes and evaluates the social thought of Dai Zhen. It interprets Dai’s thought in terms of a critique of ideology that problematizes Song dynasty Neo-Confucian moral vocabulary. Dai thinks that social critique is the ultimate goal of scholarship and he was explicit about this belief. This study will show that he analyzes the negative social consequences of Song Neo-Confucian moral discourse in sociologically sophisticated ways, and that he has developed this understanding through a series of works that began (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Zhu Xi Yu Dai Zhen Mengzi Xue Zhi Bi Jiao Yan Jiu: Yi Xi Fang Quan Shi Xue Suo Zhan Kai de Fan Si.Yachun Luo - 2012 - Xiu Wei Zi Xun Ke Ji Gu Fen You Xian Gong Si.
    本書從思想史脈絡的溯源,立足在孟學發展史上之歷史關鍵點,以宋/清孟學發展轉折切入,以朱熹/戴震做為研究對象,探究二家思想的關聯性,並從西方詮釋學的新視野研究兩家詮釋殊異之因;透過朱熹與戴震二位理學大家 ,釐清由宋至清的孟學系譜,勾勒出孟學何以能從宋明理學「向內體證理路」轉而趨向清代義理「向外道德實踐」的不同蘊趣。【秀威資訊科技股份有限公司製作】.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. Confucian Philosophy: Innovations and Transformations.Zhongying Cheng & Justin Tiwald (eds.) - 2011 - Wiley-Blackwell.
    New work on Confucian philosophy, published as a supplement to the Journal of Chinese Philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Dai Zhen's Defense of Self‐Interest.Justin Tiwald - 2011 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 38 (s1):29-45.
    This paper is devoted to explicating Dai Zhen’s defense of self-interested desires, over and against a tradition that sets strict limits to their range and function in moral agency. I begin by setting the terms of the debate between Dai and his opponents, noting that the dispute turns largely on the moral status of directly self-interested desires, or desires for one’s own good as such. I then consider three of Dai’s arguments against views that miscategorize or undervalue directly self-interested desires. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  9. Sympathy and Perspective‐Taking in Confucian Ethics.Justin Tiwald - 2011 - Philosophy Compass 6 (10):663-674.
    This article spells out a forgotten debate in Confucian ethics that concerns the finer points of empathy, sympathy, and perspective-taking (sometimes called ‘role-taking’). The debate’s central question is whether sympathy is more virtuous when it is automatic and other-focused – that is, when we engage in perspective-taking without conscious effort and sympathize without significant reference to our selves or our own feelings.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  10. Qian Qing Xue Zhe di Yi Ren Dai Zhen.Huaizhi Hu - 2010 - Zhongguo Wen Shi Chu Ban She.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Dai Zhen on Human Nature and Moral Cultivation.Justin Tiwald - 2010 - In John Makeham (ed.), The Dao Companion to Neo-Confucian Philosophy. Springer. pp. 399--422.
    An overview of Dai's ethics, highlighting some overlooked or misunderstood theses on moral deliberation and motivation.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   10 citations  
  12. Is Sympathy Naive? Dai Zhen on the Use of Shu to Track Well-Being.Justin Tiwald - 2010 - In Kam-por Yu, Julia Tao & Philip J. Ivanhoe (eds.), Taking Confucian Ethics Seriously: Contemporary Theories and Applications. SUNY.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  13. Dai Zhen on Sympathetic Concern.Justin Tiwald - 2010 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 37 (1):76-89.
    I argue that Dai Zhen’s account of sympathetic concern is distinguished from other accounts of sympathy (and empathy) by several features, the most important of which are the following: First, he sees the awareness of our similarities to others as a necessary condition for sympathy but not a constituent of it. Second, the relevant similarities are those that are grounded in our common status as living creatures, and not in our common powers of autonomy or other traits that are often (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  14. A Preliminary Discussion of Dai Zhen’s Philosophy of Language.Genyou Wu - 2010 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 5 (4):523-542.
    Dai Zhen’s philosophy of language took the opportunity of a transition in Chinese philosophy to develop a form of humanist positivism, which was different from both the Song and Ming dynasties’ School of Principles and the early Qing dynasty’s philosophical forms. His philosophy of language had four primary manifestations: (1) It differentiated between names pointing at entities and real events and names describing summum bonum and perfection ; (2) In discussing the metaphysical issue of the Dao, it was the first (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. From the “Alternative School of Principles” to the Lay Buddhism: On the Conceptual Features of Modern Consciousness-Only School From the Perspective of the Evolution of Thought During the Ming and Qing Dynasties. [REVIEW]Zhiqiang Zhang - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):64-87.
    The best representatives of the self-reflection of xinxue 心学 (the School of Mind) and its development during the Ming and Qing Dynasties are the three masters from the late Ming Dynasty. The overall tendency is to shake off the internal constraints of the School of Mind by studying the Confucian classics and history. During the Qing Dynasty, Dai Zhen had attempted to set up a theoretical system based on Confucian classics and history, offering a theoretical foundation for a new academic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. From the "Alternative School of Principles" to the Lay Buddhism: On the Conceptual Features of Modern Consciousness-Only School From the Perspective of the Evolution of Thought During the Ming and Qing Dynasties.Zhiqiang Zhang & Deyuan Huang - 2009 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 4 (1):64 - 87.
    The best representatives of the self-reflection of xinxue 心学 (the School of Mind) and its development during the Ming and Qing Dynasties are the three masters from the late Ming Dynasty. The overall tendency is to shake off the internal constraints of the School of Mind by studying the Confucian classics and history. During the Qing Dynasty, Dai Zhen had attempted to set up a theoretical system based on Confucian classics and history, offering a theoretical foundation for a new academic (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Dai Zhen.Justin Tiwald - 2006 - In Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Encyclopedia entry on the Confucian philosopher Dai Zhen 戴震 (1724-1777).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  18. Zhongguo Xian Dai Jia Zhi Guan de Chu Sheng Li Cheng: Cong Li Zhi Dao Dai Zhen.Genyou Wu - 2004 - Wuhan da Xue Chu Ban She.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  19. Confucian Moral Self Cultivation, 2nd Ed.Philip J. Ivanhoe - 2000 - Hackett.
    A concise and accessible introduction to the moral philosophy of Kongzi (Confucius), Mengzi (Mencius), Xunzi, Zhu Xi, Wang Yangming, Yan Yuan and Dai Zhen.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   11 citations  
  20. Dai Zhens Konzeption des> Li Li<-Theorie der Cheng-Zhu-Schule.Wolfgang Ommerborn - 2000 - Archiv für Begriffsgeschichte 42:9-54.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Dai Zhen: The Unity of the Moral Nature.John Ewell - 1991 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (4):387-394.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. How Tai Chen Differs From the Neo-Confucianists on Li.Jig-Chuen Lee - 1991 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (4):395-409.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Dai Zhen and the Japanese School of Ancient Learning.John Allen Tucker - 1991 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 18 (4):411-440.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Reinventing the Way: Dai Zhen's Evidential Commentary on the Meanings of Terms in Mencius (1777).John Ewell - 1990 - Dissertation, University of California Berkeley
    This dissertation presents a complete annotated translation of Dai Zhen's Evidential Commentary on the Meanings of Terms in Mencius, and includes three introductory chapters which discuss the origin and significance of the text. ;The Introduction raises the issue of what it means to regard such a text as a work of "philosophy," given that this term, as Feng Youlan points out, denotes a category of Western origin. Chapter I considers various interpretations of Dai Zhen's work that have been proposed in (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  25. Evidential Commentary on the Meanings of Terms in the Mengzi.Dai Zhen - 1990 - Yale University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Tai Chên's Inquiry Into Goodness: A Translation of the Yuan Shan, with an Introductory Essay.Chung-Ying Cheng - 1971 - Honolulu, East-West Center Press.
    Humanities Open Book Program, a joint initiative of the National Endowment for the Humanities and the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations