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  1. Normativity and Instrumentalism in David Lewis' Convention.S. M. Amadae - 2011 - History of European Ideas 37 (3):325-335.
    David Lewis presented Convention as an alternative to the conventionalism characteristic of early-twentieth-century analytic philosophy. Rudolf Carnap is well known for suggesting the arbitrariness of any particular linguistic convention for engaging in scientific inquiry. Analytic truths are self-consistent, and are not checked against empirical facts to ascertain their veracity. In keeping with the logical positivists before him, Lewis concludes that linguistic communication is conventional. However, despite his firm allegiance to conventions underlying not just languages but also social customs, he pioneered (...)
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  2. David Lewis, 1941-2001.D. M. Armstrong - 2002 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 80 (1):134-135.
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  3. Going Through the Open Door Again: Counterfactual Versus Singularist Theories of Causation.D. M. Armstrong - 2001 - In Gerhard Preyer (ed.), Reality and Humean Supervenience: Essays on the Philosophy of David Lewis. Rowman & Littlefield. pp. 163--176.
  4. David Lewis, Papers in Philosophical Logic Reviewed By.John Bacon - 1999 - Philosophy in Review 19 (2):115-117.
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  5. David Lewis, Papers in Philosophical Logic. [REVIEW]John Bacon - 1999 - Philosophy in Review 19:115-117.
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  6. Knockdown Arguments.Nathan Ballantyne - 2014 - Erkenntnis 79 (S3):525-543.
    David Lewis and Peter van Inwagen have claimed that there are no “knockdown” arguments in philosophy. Their claim appears to be at odds with common philosophical practice: philosophers often write as though their conclusions are established or proven and that the considerations offered for these conclusions are decisive. In this paper, I examine some questions raised by Lewis’s and van Inwagen’s contention. What are knockdown arguments? Are there any in philosophy? If not, why not? These questions concern the nature of (...)
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  7. Readings in the Philosophy of Psychology.Ned Block (ed.) - 1978 - , Vol.
  8. Natural Properties, Supervenience, and Mereology.Andrea Borghini & Giorgio Lando - 2011 - Humana Mente 19:79-104.
    The interpretation of Lewis‘s doctrine of natural properties is difficult and controversial, especially when it comes to the bearers of natural properties. According to the prevailing reading – the minimalist view – perfectly natural properties pertain to the micro-physical realm and are instantiated by entities without proper parts or point-like. This paper argues that there are reasons internal to a broadly Lewisian kind of metaphysics to think that the minimalist view is fundamentally flawed and that a liberal view, according to (...)
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  9. The Canberra Plan.David Braddon-Mitchell & Robert Nola (eds.) - 2001 - Oxford University Press.
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  10. Desire-as-Belief Revisited.Richard Bradley & Christian List - 2009 - Analysis 69 (1):31-37.
    On Hume’s account of motivation, beliefs and desires are very different kinds of propositional attitudes. Beliefs are cognitive attitudes, desires emotive ones. An agent’s belief in a proposition captures the weight he or she assigns to this proposition in his or her cognitive representation of the world. An agent’s desire for a proposition captures the degree to which he or she prefers its truth, motivating him or her to act accordingly. Although beliefs and desires are sometimes entangled, they play very (...)
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  11. David Lewis: On the Plurality of Worlds.Phillip Bricker - 2006 - In John Shand (ed.), Central Works of Philosophy, Vol. 5: The Twentieth Century: Quine and After. Acumen Publishing.
    David Lewis's book 'On the Plurality of Worlds' mounts an extended defense of the thesis of modal realism, that the world we inhabit the entire cosmos of which we are a part is but one of a vast plurality of worlds, or cosmoi, all causally and spatiotemporally isolated from one another. The purpose of this article is to provide an accessible summary of the main positions and arguments in Lewis's book.
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  12. Papers in Ethics and Social Philosophy. David Lewis.John Broome - 2001 - Mind 110 (439):781-783.
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  13. On the Plurality of Worlds David Lewis Oxford: Blackwell, 1986. Pp. 276. $58.00, $27.00 Paper.James Robert Brown - 1987 - Dialogue 26 (02):399-.
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  14. David Lewis Meets Hamilton and Jacobi.Jeremy Butterfield - 2004 - Philosophy of Science 71 (5):1095-1106.
    I commemorate David Lewis by discussing an aspect of modality within analytical mechanics, which is closely related to his work on counterfactuals. This concerns the way Hamilton ‐Jacobi theory uses ensembles, i.e. sets of possible initial conditions.
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  15. David Lewis Meets John Bell.Jeremy Butterfield - 1992 - Philosophy of Science 59 (1):26-43.
    The violation of the Bell inequality means that measurement-results in the two wings of the experiment cannot be screened off from one another, in the sense of Reichenbach. But does this mean that there is causation between the results? I argue that it does, according to Lewis's counterfactual analysis of causation and his associated views. The reason lies in his doctrine that chances evolve by conditionalization on intervening history. This doctrine collapses the distinction between the conditional probabilities that are used (...)
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  16. David Hume, David Lewis, and Decision Theory.Alex Byrne & Alan Hájek - 1997 - Mind 106 (423):411-728.
    David Lewis claims that a simple sort of anti-Humeanism-that the rational agent desires something to the extent he believes it to be good-can be given a decision-theoretic formulation, which Lewis calls 'Desire as Belief' (DAB). Given the (widely held) assumption that Jeffrey conditionalising is a rationally permissible way to change one's mind in the face of new evidence, Lewis proves that DAB leads to absurdity. Thus, according to Lewis, the simple form of anti-Humeanism stands refuted. In this paper we investigate (...)
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  17. Convencionalidad y Significado Sin Uso.Óscar Cabaco - 2002 - Theoria 17 (3):417-434.
    One of the main problems of Lewis' approach to the conventionality of language is the so-called "probLem of the meaning without use". In this paper I consider the possible solutions to this problem and I conclude that in order to avoid this objection Lewis' proposal must be substantially modified.
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  18. Ontology, Causality, and Mind: Essays on the Philosophy of D. M. Armstrong.Keith Cambell, John Bacon & Lloyd Reinhardt (eds.) - 1993 - Cambridge University Press.
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  19. On the Infinite in Mereology with Plural Quantification.Massimiliano Carrara & Enrico Martino - 2011 - Review of Symbolic Logic 4 (1):54-62.
    In Lewis reconstructs set theory using mereology and plural quantification (MPQ). In his recontruction he assumes from the beginning that there is an infinite plurality of atoms, whose size is equivalent to that of the set theoretical universe. Since this assumption is far beyond the basic axioms of mereology, it might seem that MPQ do not play any role in order to guarantee the existence of a large infinity of objects. However, we intend to demonstrate that mereology and plural quantification (...)
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  20. Book Review:Counterfactuals David Lewis. [REVIEW]Lewis G. Creary & Christopher S. Hill - 1975 - Philosophy of Science 42 (3):341-.
  21. Common Knowledge, Salience and Convention: A Reconstruction of David Lewis' Game Theory.Robin P. Cubitt & Robert Sugden - 2003 - Economics and Philosophy 19 (2):175-210.
    David Lewis is widely credited with the first formulation of common knowledge and the first rigorous analysis of convention. However, common knowledge and convention entered mainstream game theory only when they were formulated, later and independently, by other theorists. As a result, some of the most distinctive and valuable features of Lewis' game theory have been overlooked. We re-examine this theory by reconstructing key parts in a more formal way, extending it, and showing how it differs from more recent game (...)
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  22. Lewisian Quidditism, Humility, and Diffidence.Benjamin L. Curtis - 2016 - Philosophical Studies 173 (11):3081-3099.
    In ‘Ramseyan Humility’ Lewis presents the Permutation Argument for quidditism. As he presents it the argument is simple enough, but once one digs beneath its surface, and attempts to understand it in strictly Lewisian terms, difficulties arise. The fundamental difficulty is that, as he presents it, the argument only seems to be sound if one rejects views that Lewis explicitly holds. One aim of this paper is to clarify the argument to show that one can make sense of it in (...)
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  23. Lewis's Worldmate Relation and the Apparent Failure of Humean Supervenience.George Darby - 2009 - Dialectica 63 (2):195-204.
    This paper considers two aspects of Lewis 's metaphysics to which spatiotemporal relations appear central, with the aim of showing them to be less so. First, Lewis reluctantly characterises what it is for two things to be part of the same possible world in terms of an analogically spatiotemporal category of relations, rather than a wider natural external category. But Lewis 's reason for restricting himself to the narrower category is unpersuasive. Second, Humean supervenience is formulated with spatiotemporal relations at (...)
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  24. Lewis's Principle of Recombination: Reply to Efird and Stoneham.George Darby & Duncan Watson - 2010 - Dialectica 64 (3):435-445.
    According to Lewis's modal realism, all ways the world could be are represented by possible worlds, and all possible worlds represent some way the world could be. That there are just the right possible worlds to represent all and only the ways the world could be is to be guaranteed by the principle of recombination. Lewis sketches the principle (put roughly: anything can co-exist with anything else), but does not spell out a precise version that generates just the right possibilities. (...)
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  25. Replies to David Lewis and W.V. Quine.Donald Davidson - 1974 - Synthese 27 (3-4):345 - 349.
  26. The Analysis of Possibility and the Extent of Possibility.John Divers - 2013 - Dialectica 67 (2):183-200.
    In section 1 I motivate and execute the presentation of a well-defined Lewisian conception of analysis and of what it would be to analyse modality successfully. That conception is then put to two applications. In section 2 various inadequacies are exposed in a (recently popular) separatist approach to the understanding and/or evaluation of Lewis's analysis of modality. Section 3 provides a defence against a resilient argument for the claim that Lewis's analysis of modality cannot be fully reductive while also dealing (...)
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  27. Quinean Scepticism About de Re Modality After David Lewis.John Divers - 2007 - European Journal of Philosophy 15 (1):40–62.
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  28. Second-Order Predication and the Metaphysics of Properties.Andy Egan - 2004 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 82 (1):48-66.
    Problems about the accidental properties of properties motivate us--force us, I think--not to identify properties with the sets of their instances. If we identify them instead with functions from worlds to extensions, we get a theory of properties that is neutral with respect to disputes over counterpart theory, and we avoid a problem for Lewis's theory of events. Similar problems about the temporary properties of properties motivate us--though this time they probably don't force us--to give up this theory as well, (...)
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  29. Donald C. Williams’s Defence of Real Metaphysics.A. R. J. Fisher - 2017 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 25 (2):332-355.
    In the middle of last century metaphysics was widely criticized, ridiculed, and committed to the flames. During this period a handful of philosophers, against several anti-metaphysical trends, defended metaphysics and articulated novel metaphysical doctrines. Donald C. Williams was one of these philosophers. But while his contributions to metaphysics are well known his defence of metaphysics is not and yet it played a key part in the development and revival of metaphysics. In this paper I present his defence of metaphysics in (...)
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  30. David Lewis, Donald C. Williams, and the History of Metaphysics in the Twentieth Century.A. R. J. Fisher - 2015 - Journal of the American Philosophical Association 1 (1):3--22.
    The revival of analytic metaphysics in the latter half of the twentieth century is typically understood as a consequence of the critiques of logical positivism, Quine’s naturalization of ontology, Kripke’s Naming and Necessity, clarifications of modal notions in logic, and the theoretical exploitation of possible worlds. However, this explanation overlooks the work of metaphysicians at the height of positivism and linguisticism that affected metaphysics of the late twentieth century. Donald C. Williams is one such philosopher. In this paper I explain (...)
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  31. David Lewis on Indicative and Counterfactual Conditionals.Robert J. Fogelin - 1998 - Analysis 58 (4):286–289.
    David Lewis has argued that there must be a difference between indicative and counterfactual conditionals beyond an indication of truth-value commitments. He cites the following contrast to show this: If Oswald did not shoot Kennedy, then someone else did. If Oswald had not shot Kennedy, then someone else would have. In response, it is shown that this difference is better explained by shifts in context. Keep context fixed, the contrast disappears. EG: If Oswald was not the one who shot Kennedy, (...)
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  32. Book Review: David Lewis. Parts of Classes. [REVIEW]Peter Forrest - 1991 - Notre Dame Journal of Formal Logic 32 (3):494-497.
  33. An Argument Against David Lewis' Theory of Possible Worlds.Peter Forrest & D. M. Armstrong - 1984 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 62 (2):164 – 168.
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  34. Justice or Tyranny?: A Critique of John Rawls's “Theory of Justice” David Lewis Schaefer Port Washington: Kennikat Press Corp, 1979. Pp. 137. $12.50. [REVIEW]Laurel Fujimagari - 1982 - Dialogue 21 (2):356-360.
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  35. Lewis's Principle of Recombination: Reply to Efird and Stoneham.Duncan Watson George Darby - 2010 - Dialectica 64 (3):435-445.
    According to Lewis's modal realism, all ways the world could be are represented by possible worlds, and all possible worlds represent some way the world could be. That there are just the right possible worlds to represent all and only the ways the world could be is to be guaranteed by the principle of recombination. Lewis sketches the principle , but does not spell out a precise version that generates just the right possibilities. David Efird and Tom Stoneham have offered (...)
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  36. Lewis, Wilson, Hume: A Response to Jessica Wilson on Lewisian Plenitude and Hume’s Dictum.C. J. K. Gibilisco - 2016 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 59 (3):295-317.
    According to David Lewis’s Modal Realism, other possible worlds really exist as concrete, spatiotemporal systems, and every way that a world could be is a way that some world is. To establish this plenitude of concrete possible worlds, Lewis presents his ‘principle of recombination,’ which is meant to guarantee that there exists a possible world, or part of a possible world, for every possibility. Jessica Wilson has recently argued that Lewis’s principle of recombination fails to generate enough worlds to account (...)
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  37. Metaphysics and the Philosophical Imagination.Peter Godfrey-Smith - 2012 - Philosophical Studies 160 (1):97-113.
    Methods and goals in philosophy are discussed by first describing an ideal, and then looking at how the ideal might be approached. David Lewis’s work in metaphysics is critically examined and compared to analogous work by Mackie and Carnap. Some large-scale philosophical systematic work, especially in metaphysics, is best treated as model-building, in a sense of that term that draws on the philosophy of science. Models are constructed in a way that involves deliberate simplification, or other imaginative modification of reality, (...)
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  38. A Companion to the Philosophy of Mind.Samuel D. Guttenplan (ed.) - 1994 - Cambridge: Blackwell.
    The philosophy of mind is one of the fastest-growing areas in philosophy, not least because of its connections with related areas of psychology, linguistics and computation. This _Companion_ is an alphabetically arranged reference guide to the subject, firmly rooted in the philosophy of mind, but with a number of entries that survey adjacent fields of interest. The book is introduced by the editor's substantial _Essay on the Philosophy of Mind_ which serves as an overview of the subject, and is closely (...)
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  39. David Lewis.Alan Hájek - 2010 - In The New Dictionary of Scientific Biography. Scribners.
    David Lewis was one of the most important philosophers of the 20th century working in the Anglo-American analytic tradition. His corpus is extraordinary for its breadth of subject matter and for its systematicity. For both these reasons, it is difficult to do justice to his work in a short space—there are rich interconnections among his myriad writings, and numerous possible entry points. This article approaches Lewis and his work in three passes: first, a biographical tracing of his intellectual influences; second, (...)
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  40. David Lewis's Metaphysics.Ned Hall - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
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  41. David Lewis.Ned Hall - 2002 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 10 (1):81-84.
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  42. Infinite Time Turing Machines.Joel David Hamkins & Andy Lewis - 2000 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 65 (2):567-604.
    Infinite time Turing machines extend the operation of ordinary Turing machines into transfinite ordinal time. By doing so, they provide a natural model of infinitary computability, a theoretical setting for the analysis of the power and limitations of supertask algorithms.
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  43. David Lewis on Rights Introduction.Sven Ove Hansson - 2003 - Theoria 69 (3):157-159.
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  44. Reality and Humean Supervenience: Essays on the Philosophy of David Lewis Gerhard Preyer and Frank Siebelt, Editors Studies in Epistemology and Cognitive Theory Lanham, MD: Rowman and Littlefield, 2001, Xii + 243 Pp., $27.95 Paper. [REVIEW]Jussi Haukioja - 2003 - Dialogue 42 (02):389-.
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  45. Quantity in Lewisian Metaphysics.John Hawthorne - 2006 - In Metaphysical Essays. Oxford University Press. pp. 229-237.
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  46. David Lewis' Mögliche Welten.Reinhart Heissler - 2010 - Tectum Verlag.
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  47. David Lewis and the Kangaroo: Graphing Philosophical Progress.Benj Hellie - forthcoming - In Russell Blackford & Damien Broderick (eds.), Philosophy's Future: The Problem of Philosophical Progress. Blackwell.
    Data-driven historiography of philosophy looks to objective modeling tools for illumination of the propagation of influence. While the system of David Lewis, the most influential philosopher of our time, raises historiographic puzzles to stymie conventional analytic methods, it proves amenable to data-driven analysis. A striking result is that Lewis only becomes the metaphysician of current legend following the midpoint of his career: his initial project is to frame a descriptive science of mind and meaning; the transition to metaphysics is a (...)
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  48. Philosophical Papers: Volume 1. By David Lewis.Herbert E. Hendry - 1987 - Modern Schoolman 64 (2):133-134.
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  49. Papers in Philosophical Logic. David K. Lewis.Matthias Hild - 2001 - Mind 110 (440):1092-1097.
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  50. Finitude and Infinitude in the Atomic Calculus of Individuals.Wilfrid Hodges & David Lewis - 1968 - Noûs 2 (4):405-410.
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