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  1. American Sign Language and End-of-Life Care: Research in the Deaf Community. [REVIEW]Barbara Allen, Nancy Meyers, John Sullivan & Melissa Sullivan - 2002 - HEC Forum 14 (3):197-208.
    We describe how a Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) process was used to develop a means of discussing end-of-life care needs of Deaf seniors. This process identified a variety of communication issues to be addressed in working with this special population. We overview the unique linguistic and cultural characteristics of this community and their implications for working with Deaf individuals to provide information for making informed decisions about end-of-life care, including completion of health care directives. Our research and our work with (...)
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  2. Note-Deafness.Grant Allen - 1878 - Mind 3 (10):157-167.
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  3. Signs of Resistance: Peer Learning of Sign Languages Within 'Oral' Schools for the Deaf.Hannah Anglin-Jaffe - 2013 - Studies in Philosophy and Education 32 (3):261-271.
    This article explores the role of the Deaf child as peer educator. In schools where sign languages were banned, Deaf children became the educators of their Deaf peers in a number of contexts worldwide. This paper analyses how this peer education of sign language worked in context by drawing on two examples from boarding schools for the deaf in Nicaragua and Thailand. The argument is advanced that these practices constituted a child-led oppositional pedagogy. A connection is drawn to Freire’s (1972) (...)
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  4. Deafness, Ideas and the Language of Thought in the Late 1600s.Noga Arikha - 2005 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 13 (2):233 – 262.
  5. The Sociomoral Reasoning and Behaviour of Deaf Children.Paul Arnold - 1993 - Journal of Moral Education 22 (2):157-166.
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  6. Through Deaf Eyes: A Photographic History of an American Community.Douglas Baynton, Jack R. Gannon & Jean Lindquist Bergey - 2007 - Gallaudet University Press.
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  7. Seeing Philosophy: Deaf Students and Deaf Philosophers.Blankmeyer Burke Teresa - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (4):443-451.
    The discussion note examines communication needs of deaf students and deaf philosophers in the classroom, with particular attention to working with qualified signed language interpreters in the classroom and creating an inclusive classroom environment for deaf students. It additionally considers the question of whether signed languages, such as American Sign Language (ASL), can convey abstract philosophical concepts used in spoken languages, and concludes that this is possible, suggesting that the small number of deaf philosophers using ASL has affected the development (...)
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  8. Deaf People: Community and World View.Marcel Broesterhuizen - 2009 - Gregorianum 90 (3):485-509.
    Communities of Deaf people consider themselves a minority with its own language, Sign Language, and culture. Two basic characteristics of Deaf Culture, its orientation on community and the awareness of an own Deaf worldview different from hearing people's worldview, are often not recognized by Christian Churches. This article tries to find a theological answer on this dramatic situation, formulating a theological foundation of the legitimacy of Deaf people's experience of God's presence in the Deaf community, and the thesis that God's (...)
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  9. The Importance of Special Cases: Or How the Deaf Might Be, But Are Not, Phonological Dyslexics.Ruth Campbell - 1991 - Mind and Language 6 (2):107-112.
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  10. Choosing Deafness with Preimplantation Genetic Diagnosis: An Ethical Way to Carry on a Cultural Bloodline?Silvia Camporesi - 2010 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 19 (1):86.
    These words were written by ethicist Jonathan Glover in his paper “Future People, Disability and Screening” in 1992. Whereas screening and choosing for a disability remained a theoretical possibility 16 years ago, it has now become reality. In 2006, Susannah Baruch and colleagues at John Hopkins University published a survey of 190 American preimplantation genetic diagnosis clinics, and found that 3% reported having the intentional use of PGD “to select an embryo for the presence of a disability.” Even before, in (...)
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  11. Deaf People.A. Different Center - 2006 - In Lennard J. Davis (ed.), The Disability Studies Reader. Psychology Press.
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  12. Improvised Contexts: Movement, Perception and Expression in Deaf Children's Interactions.Herman Coenen - 1986 - Journal of Phenomenological Psychology 17 (1):1-31.
  13. Deaf by Design: A Business Argument Against Engineering Disabled Offspring.Dennis R. Cooley - 2007 - Journal of Business Ethics 71 (2):209-227.
    If Solomon is correct in labeling businesses as community citizens because they “are part and parcel of the communities in which they live and flourish, and the responsibilities that they bear are ... intrinsic to their very existence as social entities,” then it follows that other community citizens have reciprocal duties toward them that they, as community citizens, have to any other community citizen. One of these duties is not to harm needlessly another community citizen without its permission. One issue (...)
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  14. Can It Be a Good Thing to Be Deaf?Rachel Cooper - 2007 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (6):563 – 583.
    Increasingly, Deaf activists claim that it can be good to be Deaf. Still, much of the hearing world remains unconvinced, and continues to think of deafness in negative terms. I examine this debate and argue that to determine whether it can be good to be deaf it is necessary to examine each claimed advantage or disadvantage of being deaf, and then to make an overall judgment regarding the net cost or benefit. On the basis of such a survey I conclude (...)
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  15. First Language Acquisition Differs From Second Language Acquisition in Prelingually Deaf Signers: Evidence From Sensitivity to Grammaticality Judgement in British Sign Language.K. Cormier, A. Schembri, D. Vinson & E. Orfanidou - 2012 - Cognition 124 (1):50-65.
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  16. Role of Mental Imagery in Free Recall of Deaf, Blind, and Normal Subjects.Ellis M. Craig - 1973 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 97 (2):249.
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  17. Paul Preston: Mother Father Deaf: Living Between Sound and Silence.Robert A. Crouch - 1998 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 19 (4):419-422.
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  18. Letting the Deaf Be Deaf: Reconsidering the Use of Cochlear Implants in Prelingually Deaf Children.Robert A. Crouch - 1997 - Hastings Center Report 27 (4):14-21.
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  19. Cochlear Implants and the Claims of Culture? A Response to Lane and Grodin.Dena S. Davis - 1997 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (3):253-258.
    : Because I reject the notion that physical characteristics constitute cultural membership, I argue that, even if the claim were persuasive that deafness is a culture rather than a disability, there is no reason to fault hearing parents who choose cochlear implants for their deaf children.
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  20. A History of Misunderstandings: The History of the Deaf.A. de Saint-Loup - 1996 - Diogenes 44 (175):1-25.
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  21. The Blind-Deaf-Mute Helen Keller. Editor - 1889 - Mind 14 (54):305-308.
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  22. The Education of the Deaf: History of the Department of Education of the Deaf, University of Manchester, 1919-1955.A. W. G. Ewing & Ellis Llwyd Jones - 1956 - British Journal of Educational Studies 4 (2):103 - 128.
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  23. On the Supposed Moral Harm of Selecting for Deafness.Melissa Seymour Fahmy - 2011 - Bioethics 25 (3):128-136.
    This paper demonstrates that accounting for the moral harm of selecting for deafness is not as simple or obvious as the widespread negative response from the hearing community would suggest. The central questions addressed by the paper are whether our moral disquiet with regard to selecting for deafness can be adequately defended, and if so, what this might entail. The paper considers several different strategies for accounting for the supposed moral harm of selecting for deafness and concludes that the deaf (...)
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  24. General Linguistic Competency in the Deaf a Prerequisite for Developing a Theory of Mind?Ronald Jan Frey - 1997
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  25. On Understanding Without Words: Communication Between a Deaf-Blind Child and Her Parents. [REVIEW]David A. Goode - 1990 - Human Studies 13 (1):1 - 37.
    This paper is an empirical inquiry into the nature of human communication and understanding. It is organized into three sections. First, there is an overview of the ethnomethodological critique of mainstream social scientific research methodology and the relevance of this critique to clinical behavioral research. Second, the details of an ethnomethodological study of communication practices in a family with an alingual, deaf-blind child are provided. Third, implications of the case study are presented.
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  26. Ethical Issues in Cochlear Implant Surgery: An Exploration Into Disease, Disability, and the Best Interests of the Child.Michael Grodin & Harlan Lane - 1997 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 7 (3):231-251.
    : This paper examines ethical issues related to medical practices with children and adults who are members of a linguistic and cultural minority known as the DEAF-WORLD. Members of that culture characteristically have hearing parents and are treated by hearing professionals whose values, particularly concerning language, speech, and hearing, are typically quite different from their own. That disparity has long fueled a debate on several ethical issues, most recently the merits of cochlear implant surgery for DEAF children. We explore whether (...)
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  27. Deaf Culture.Stephan Haimowitz - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (2):5-5.
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  28. Semantic Nativism and the Language of Thought: Some Implications of the American Sign Language for Fodor's Innateness Hypothesis.James Edward Haynes - 1999 - Dissertation, University of Maryland, College Park
    This dissertation is an examination of the Language of Thought thesis posited by Jerry Fodor. Fodor believes that our language of thought is a very robust language, one that essentially has all of the conceptual resources of any humanly possible language. I find Fodor's position regarding concepts extreme---too much is innate in the Language of Thought as he posits it. I believe that an analysis of the American Sign Language may cast light on some of the problems with Fodor's view. (...)
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  29. There is a Difference Between Selecting a Deaf Embryo and Deafening a Hearing Child.M. Hayry - 2004 - Journal of Medical Ethics 30 (5):510-512.
    If genetic diagnosis and preimplantation selection could be employed to produce deaf children, would it be acceptable for deaf parents to do so? Some say no, because there is no moral difference between selecting a deaf embryo and deafening a hearing child, and because it would be wrong to deafen infants. It is argued in this paper, however, that this view is untenable. There are differences between the two activities, and it is perfectly possible to condone genetic selection for deafness (...)
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  30. Thought Before Language: A Deaf-Mute's Recollections.William James - 1892 - Philosophical Review 1 (6):613-624.
  31. Silence of the Spheres: The Deaf Experience in the History of Science.Harry G. Lang - 1994 - Bergin & Garvey.
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  32. A Phone Of Our Own: The Deaf Insurrection Against Ma Bell. [REVIEW]Kenneth Lipartito - 2002 - Isis: A Journal of the History of Science 93:740-741.
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  33. Deaf Children's Phonetic, Visual, and Dactylic Coding in a Grapheme Recall Task.John L. Locke & Virginia L. Locke - 1971 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 89 (1):142.
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  34. Genetic Selection for Deafness: The Views of Hearing Children of Deaf Adults.C. Mand, R. E. Duncan, L. Gillam, V. Collins & M. B. Delatycki - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (12):722-728.
    The concept of selecting for a disability, and deafness in particular, has triggered a controversial and sometimes acrimonious debate between key stakeholders. Previous studies have concentrated on the views of the deaf and hard of hearing, health professionals and ethicists towards reproductive selection for deafness. This study, however, is the first of its kind examining the views of hearing children of deaf adults towards preimplantation genetic diagnosis and prenatal diagnosis to select for or against deafness. Hearing children of deaf adults (...)
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  35. Sociomoral Reasoning in Congenitally Deaf Children as a Function of Cognitive Maturity.Diomedes Markoulis & Maria Christoforou - 1991 - Journal of Moral Education 20 (1):79-93.
    Abstract The operational and sociomoral reasoning maturity of 70 congenitally deaf children was examined and compared with the respective maturity of a sensory unimpaired control sample, matched in age (7?13 years) and socioeconomic background. Subjects were tested individually on three Piagetian tasks (conservation of substance, classification and class inclusion) and on a number of story pairs dealing with clumsiness, stealing and two dimensions of the justice concept. Results bearing on the operational reasoning showed a slower developmental rate in the deaf, (...)
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  36. A Comparison of Deaf and Hearing Children in Visual Memory for Digits.Rudolf Pintner & Donald G. Paterson - 1917 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 2 (1):76-88.
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  37. Better Off Deaf.Robert Sparrow - 2002 - Res Publica 11 (1): 11-16.
  38. Lesbian Couple Create a Child Who is Deaf Like Them.M. Spriggs - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):283-283.
    A deaf lesbian couple who chose to have a deaf child receive a lot of criticismA deaf lesbian couple in the US deliberately tried to create a deaf child. Sharon Duchesneau and Candy McCullough hoped their child, conceived with the help of a sperm donor, would be deaf like the rest of the family. Their daughter, five year old Jehanne, is also deaf and was conceived with the same donor. News of the couple choosing to have a deaf child has (...)
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  39. The Mental Development of Deaf Children.J. Stachyra - 1971 - Roczniki Filozoficzne 19 (4):101-114.
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  40. Philosophy's Real-World Consequences for Deaf People: Thoughts on Iconicity, Sign Language and Being Deaf.Ernst Thoutenhoofd - 2000 - Human Studies 23 (3):261-279.
    The body of philosophical knowledge concerning the relations among language, the senses, and deafness, interpreted as a canon of key ideas which have found their way into folk metaphysics, constitutes one of the historically sustained conditions of the oppression of deaf people. Jonathan Rée, with his book I see a voice, makes the point that a philosophical history, grounded in a phenomenological and causal concern with philosophical thought and social life, can offer an archaeology of philosophy's contribution to the social (...)
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  41. Deaf Culture-Response.B. Tucker - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (2):5-5.
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  42. Short-Term Memory and Coding Strategies in the Deaf.Graeme Wallace & Michael C. Corballis - 1973 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 99 (3):334-348.
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  43. Sound Communication with the Deaf.Norbert Wiener - 1949 - Philosophy of Science 16 (3):260-262.
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  44. The Perception of Obstacles by the Deaf.Philip Worchel & Joe H. Berry - 1952 - Journal of Experimental Psychology 43 (3):187.
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  45. There's a Deaf Student in Your Philosophy Class—Now What?Charles E. Zimmerman Jr - 2007 - Teaching Philosophy 30 (4):421-442.
    Having a deaf student in class can pose a tremendous challenge for both the professor and the student, but it can also be an incredibly rewarding experience. To help make it so, this article briefly covers the differences between American Sign Language and English and then identifies aspects of linguistic skills where the deaf student may encounter difficulty in dealing with Philosophy. Those discussed are inadequate vocabulary, problems in reading and writing, insufficient background or “life” information, and difficulty in dealing (...)
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