Death and Dying

Edited by Craig Paterson (Complutense University of Madrid)
Related categories

6096 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 6096
Material to categorize
  1. Coronavirus and Value Pluralism : A Robust Ethical Perspective on a Pandemic.Ignace Haaz - forthcoming - Journal of Dharma.
    The fear of the largely unknown consequences of being exposed to coronavirus should have brought a more dynamic interplay of beliefs and opinions for those who in the footsteps of J.S. Mill believe that the limits of power, which can be legitimately exercised by society over the individual, is to prevent harm to others (Mill, 1859, Introduction). To be kept in a room is an invitation to think or do things with a higher degree of intelligence, empathy and tact. Our (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. Good to Die.Rainer Ebert - 2013 - Diacritica 27:139-156.
    Among those who reject the Epicurean claim that death is not bad for the one who dies, it is popularly held that death is bad for the one who dies, when it is bad for the one who dies, because it deprives the one who dies of the good things that otherwise would have fallen into her life. This view is known as the deprivation account of the value of death, and Fred Feldman is one of its most prominent defenders. (...)
    No categories
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. From Dusk Till Dawn: Bioethical Insights Into the Beginning and the End of Life.Evangelos D. Protopapadakis - 2019 - Berlin, Germany: Logos Verlag.
    From Dawn till Dusk embraces the conceptual challenges often associated with Bioethics by taking the reader on a journey that embodies the circle of life and what it means to be human. The beginning and the end of life have always been an impossible riddle to humans. Bioethics does not aspire to unveil utter truths regarding the purpose of our existence; on the contrary, its task is to settle controversial issues that arise within this finite, very fragile and vulnerable life, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Epistemic Burdens, Moral Intimacy, and Surrogate Decision Making.Parker Crutchfield & Scott Scheall - 2020 - American Journal of Bioethics 20 (2):59-61.
    Berger (forthcoming) states that moral intimacy is important in applying the best interests standard. But what he calls moral intimacy requires that someone has overcome epistemic burdens needed to represent the patient. We argue elsewhere that good surrogate decision-making is first and foremost a matter of overcoming epistemic burdens, or those obstacles that stand in the way of a surrogate decision-maker knowing what a patient wants and how to satisfy those preferences. Berger’s notion of moral intimacy depends on epistemic intimacy: (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  5. Diverse Approaches to Meaning-Making at the End of Life.Hollen N. Reischer & John Beverley - 2019 - American Journal of Bioethics 19 (12):68-70.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. Questionable Benefits and Unavoidable Personal Beliefs: Defending Conscientious Objection for Abortion.Bruce Philip Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2020 - Journal of Medical Ethics 3 (46):178-182.
    Conscientious objection in healthcare has come under heavy criticism on two grounds recently, particularly regarding abortion provision. First, critics claim conscientious objection involves a refusal to provide a legal and beneficial procedure requested by a patient, denying them access to healthcare. Second, they argue the exercise of conscientious objection is based on unverifiable personal beliefs. These characteristics, it is claimed, disqualify conscientious objection in healthcare. Here, we defend conscientious objection in the context of abortion provision. We show that abortion has (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  7. Aristotelian Friendship and Ignatian Companionship.Karen Stohr - 2017 - In David McPherson (ed.), Spirituality and the Good Life: Philosophical Approaches. Cambridge, UK: pp. 155-176.
    This essay aims to construct a relationship between Aristotle's account of friendship in the Nicomachean Ethics and the ideal of companionship articulated and lived out by St. Ignatius of Loyola, the founder of the Jesuit order. Although on the surface, it may seem as though Aristotelian friendship and Ignatian companionship have little in common, given that the accounts were developed in such different contexts, I argue that there are similarities worth exploring. Taken together, the accounts can help illuminate the good (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. Meeting the Epicurean Challenge: A Reply to Christensen.Bruce P. Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2019 - Journal of Medical Ethics 45 (7):478-479.
    In ’Abortion and deprivation: a reply to Marquis’, Anna Christensen contends that Don Marquis’ influential ’future like ours’ argument for the immorality of abortion faces a significant challenge from the Epicurean claim that human beings cannot be harmed by their death. If deprivation requires a subject, then abortion cannot deprive a fetus of a future of value, as no individual exists to be deprived once death has occurred. However, the Epicurean account also implies that the wrongness of murder is also (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  9. The Ego and the Spirit, Chapter 1.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    This is the first chapter of a projected book to be entitled, The Ego and the Spirit. This book will endeavor to examine what lies at the heart of human spiritual aspiration from a psychological, philosophical, and religious perspective. In this first chapter, I discuss the predicament of the human ego, charged with a task that it cannot fulfill: To establish itself securely within being. The ego's efforts to fulfill this task through its dealings with the things and people of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. A Death of One's Own.Martin Hollis - 1988 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 23:1-15.
    Rilke's remark conjures up an officious array of well-meaning persons bent on completing our orderly passage from cradle to grave. They tidy our files cosily about us, inject us with extreme unction and slide us into the warm embrace of the undertaker. At the forefront of the array stands the doctor, part mechanic and part priest. His main task is to repair the living with resources whose effective and impartial allocation is a chief topic of medical ethics. But his role (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. The Problem of Spontaneous Abortion: Is the Pro-Life Position Morally Monstrous?Bruce P. Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2019 - The New Bioethics 25 (2):103-120.
    A substantial proportion of human embryos spontaneously abort soon after conception, and ethicists have argued this is problematic for the pro-life view that a human embryo has the same moral status as an adult from conception. Firstly, if human embryos are our moral equals, this entails spontaneous abortion is one of humanity’s most important problems, and it is claimed this is absurd, and a reductio of the moral status claim. Secondly, it is claimed that pro-life advocates do not act as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  12. Things Fall Apart: Reflections on the Dying of My Dad.Richard Oxenberg - manuscript
    In December of 2013, my Dad died of advanced Alzheimer's and a condition called Myasthenia Gravis. This is a selection of journal entries I made over the course of the two years leading up to my Dad's death. It is not a philosophical essay, but a personal reflection, in "real time" so to speak, on the nature of the dying process in relation to questions of faith, hope, despair, and the meaning of a man's life. I offer it here for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Engaging Requests for Nondisclosure During Admission to Home Hospice Care.Timothy W. Kirk & E. Willis Partington - 2015 - Journal of Hospice and Palliative Nursing 17 (3):174-180.
    It is not uncommon for hospice admission nurses to receive requests from loved ones to withhold information from patients about their diagnosis or prognosis. Such requests may occur in the context of similar requests having previously been honored by other, nonhospice care teams. This article explores the ethical questions raised by such requests and the motivations behind them. Following, it offers ways to engage requests for nondisclosure that honor ethical obligations to patients and families in a manner consistent with the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. Hope, Dying and Solidarity.Anthony Wrigley - 2019 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 22 (1):187-204.
    Hope takes on a particularly important role in end of life situations. Sustaining hope can have considerable benefits for the quality of life and any prospect of a good death for the dying. However, it has proved difficult to adequately account for hope when dying, particularly in some of the more extreme end of life situations. Standard secular accounts of hope struggle to establish how the fostering of hope may be possible in such situations. This leads to a practical ethical (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. On Charlie Gard: Ethics, Culture, and Religion.Marvin J. H. Lee - 2018 - Journal of Healthcare Ethics and Administration 4 (2):1-17.
    The 2017 story of Charlie Gard is revisited. Upon the British High Court’s ruling in favor of the physicians that the infant should be allowed to die without the experimental treatment, the view of the public as well as the opinions of bioethicists and Catholic bishops are divided, interestingly along with a cultural line. American bioethicists and Catholic bishops tend to believe that the parents should have the final say while British/European bioethicists and Catholic bishops in general side with the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. L’Assistance au Suicide En Suisse.Delphine Montariol - 2008 - Médecine et Droit 2008 (91):106-112.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Ectogenesis and the Case Against the Right to the Death of the Foetus.Bruce P. Blackshaw & Daniel Rodger - 2019 - Bioethics 33 (1):76-81.
    Ectogenesis, or the use of an artificial womb to allow a foetus to develop, will likely become a reality within a few decades, and could significantly affect the abortion debate. We first examine the implications for Judith Jarvis Thomson’s violinist analogy, which argues for a woman’s right to withdraw life support from the foetus and so terminate her pregnancy, even if the foetus is granted full moral status. We show that on Thomson’s reasoning, there is no right to the death (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. Book Review: The Duty to Die: Does It Exist, and What Are the Consequences? [REVIEW]Alissa M. Hurwitz - 2000 - Ethics and Behavior 10 (4):397-402.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. Confidentiality in End-of-Life and After-Death Situations.Rebekah J. Bardash, Caroline Burke & James L. Werth - 2002 - Ethics and Behavior 12 (3):205-222.
    Confidentiality is one of the foundations on which psychotherapy is built. Limitations on confidentiality in the therapeutic process have been explained and explored by many authors and organizations. However, controversy and confusion continue to exist with regard to the limitations on confidentiality in situations where clients are considering their options at the end of life and after a client has died. This article reviews these 2 areas and provides some suggestions for future research.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. IQ Testing: A Matter of Life or Death.Gerald P. Koocher - 2003 - Ethics and Behavior 13 (1):1-2.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. Opioids, Double Effect, and the Prospects of Hastening Death.Philip Reed - forthcoming - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    The relevance of double effect for end of life decision-making has been challenged recently by a number of scholars. The principal reason is that opioids such as morphine do not usually hasten death when administered to relieve pain at the end of life; therefore no secondary “double” effect is brought about. In my paper I argue against this view, showing how the doctrine of double effect is relevant to the administration of opioids at the end of life. I contend that (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Review of The Practice of Death by Eike-Henner W. Kluge.Alison Jaggar - 1976 - The Queen's Quarterly (Canada) (1).
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. Pedagogy and the Art of Death: Reparative Readings of Death and Dying in Margaret Edson’s Wit.Christine M. Gottlieb - 2018 - Journal of Medical Humanities 39 (3):325-336.
    Wit explores modes of reading representations of death and dying, both through the play’s sustained engagement with Donne’s Holy Sonnets and through Vivian’s self-reflexive approach to her illness and death. I argue that the play dramatizes reparative readings, a term coined by Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick to describe an alternative to the paranoid reading practices that have come to dominate literary criticism. By analyzing the play’s reparative readings of death and dying, I show how Wit provides lessons about knowledge-making and reading (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. Obrana asistované smrti: Filozofické argumenty ve prospěch eutanazie a sebeusmrcení za pomoci lékaře.Tomas Hribek - manuscript
    [A Defence of Assisted Death: Philosophical Arguments for Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide] První monografie v českém jazyce, která nabízí detailní filozofickou obranu různých forem asistované smrti včetně eutanazie. Autor vysvětluje kontext a příčiny současné diskuse, zavádí a zdůvodňuje potřebné pojmové distinkce a analyzuje argumenty ve prospěch asistovaného sebeusmrcení i vyžádané eutanazie. Hlavní část knihy je ve formě odpovědí na časté otázky: Je smrt za všech okolností pro umírajícího újmou? Řeší strategie, například nezahájení nebo ukončení léčby či paliativní péče, jež jsou (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Book Review: Death and the Afterlife In the New TestamentDeath and the Afterlife In the New TestamentbyClark-SolesJaimeT & T Clark, Continuum, New York, 2006. 161 Pp. $29.95. ISBN 978-0-567-0291-6. [REVIEW]Dale C. Allison - 2008 - Interpretation: A Journal of Bible and Theology 62 (1):103-103.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. Thinking of Life Through Death: A Question of Life.Shunko Tashiro, Akinori Imai & Ken Yamada - 1995 - Buddhist-Christian Studies 15:67.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Case Study: Dying of Gallstones.Matthew B. Weinger, Edward J. Dunn & Felicia Cohn - 2003 - Hastings Center Report 33 (1):14.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. Old World News: Death Is the Remedy?Richard H. Nicholson - 2002 - Hastings Center Report 32 (1):9.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Old World News: Intimations of Immortality.Richard H. Nicholson - 2000 - Hastings Center Report 30 (5):6.
  30. “A Quick and Painless Death”.Richard H. Nicholson - 1993 - Hastings Center Report 23 (3):5.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  31. At Law: Killing Machines.George J. Annas - 1991 - Hastings Center Report 21 (2):33.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  32. Law and the Life Sciences: When Suicide Prevention Becomes Brutality: The Case of Elizabeth Bouvia.George J. Annas - 1984 - Hastings Center Report 14 (2):20.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  33. Case Study: The Second-Hand Suicide Threat.David Doukas & Willard Gaylin - 1995 - Hastings Center Report 25 (6):20.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Thinking About Death as a Wax AppleThinking Clearly About Death.Eric J. Cassell & F. Rosenberg - 1984 - Hastings Center Report 14 (2):43.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. Dying and Death in Later Anglo-Saxon England. Victoria Thompson.Martin Welch - 2006 - Speculum 81 (2):619-620.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Why Arguments Against Infanticide Remain Convincing: A Reply to Räsänen.Daniel Rodger, Bruce P. Blackshaw & Clinton Wilcox - 2018 - Bioethics 32 (3):215-219.
    In ‘Pro-life arguments against infanticide and why they are not convincing’ Joona Räsänen argues that Christopher Kaczor's objections to Giubilini and Minerva's position on infanticide are not persuasive. We argue that Räsänen's criticism is largely misplaced, and that he has not engaged with Kaczor's strongest arguments against infanticide. We reply to each of Räsänen's criticisms, drawing on the full range of Kaczor's arguments, as well as adding some of our own.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  37. Life, Death, Renewal.Chris Matthew Sciabarra - 2014 - Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 14 (1):1-4.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Life, Death, Renewal.Chris Matthew Sciabarra - 2014 - Journal of Ayn Rand Studies 14 (1):1-4.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Therapy, Enhancement, and Medicine: Challenges for the Doctor–Patient Relationship and Patient Safety.James J. Delaney & David Martin - 2017 - Journal of Business Ethics 146 (4):831-844.
    There are ethical guidelines that form the foundation of the traditional doctor–patient relationship in medicine. Health care providers are under special obligations to their patients. These include obligations to disclose information, to propose alternative treatments that allow patients to make decisions based on their own values, and to have special concern for patients’ best interests. Furthermore, patients know that these obligations exist and so come to their physicians with a significant level of trust. In this sense, therapeutic medicine significantly differs (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  40. Flat Death: Snapshots of History.Elissa Marder - 1992 - Diacritics 22 (3/4):127.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  41. Death and Dignity in Catholic Christian Thought.Daniel P. Sulmasy - 2017 - Medicine, Health Care and Philosophy 20 (4):537-543.
    This article traces the history of the concept of dignity in Western thought, arguing that it became a formal Catholic theological concept only in the late nineteenth century. Three uses of the word are distinguished: intrinsic, attributed, and inflorescent dignity, of which, it is argued, the intrinsic conception is foundational. The moral norms associated with respect for intrinsic dignity are discussed briefly. The scriptural and theological bases for adopting the concept of dignity as a Christian idea are elucidated. The article (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  42. Begriffliche Verschiebungen in der Sterbehilfe-Debatte Und Ihre Ethische Bewertung.Markus Rothhaar & Roland Kipke - 2017 - In Franz-Josef Bormann (ed.), Lebensbeendende Handlungen: Ethik, Medizin Und Recht Zur Grenze von ‚Töten‘ Und ‚Sterbenlassen‘. De Gruyter. pp. 753-764.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  43. How Should Christians Make Judgments at the Edge of Life and Death?Mark Cherry - 2006 - Christian Bioethics 12 (1):1-10.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  44. The Ethical Claim of a Dying Brother.P. T. Schotsmans - 2003 - Christian Bioethics 9 (2-3):331-336.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  45. Hidden Patency: On the Iconic Character of Human Life.B. V. Foltz - 2001 - Christian Bioethics 7 (3):317-331.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  46. Can Anyone Be Prepared Enough for Life With an LVAD-DT?Sara E. Wordingham & Keith M. Swetz - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (2):14-16.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. Life and Death and a Machine.Joel Howell - 2017 - American Journal of Bioethics 17 (2):12-13.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Making Sense of a Wish to Hasten Death.Dilinie Herbert - 2016 - Chisholm Health Ethics Bulletin 21 (4):7.
    Herbert, Dilinie How should health professionals respond if a patient nearing the end of life expresses a wish to hasten their death? To answer this question, this article draws upon peer‐reviewed literature, the practices of palliative care, and the experiences of two palliative care physicians, Associate Professor Natasha Michael and Associate Professor Mark Boughey. The expression of a wish to hasten death does not necessarily imply a genuine desire to hasten death or to be helped to die. To the contrary, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  49. Killing, Letting Die, and the Death Penalty in Advance.Brian K. Powell - forthcoming - International Journal of Applied Philosophy.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. The Limits of Surrogates’ Moral Authority and Physician Professionalism: Can the Paradigm of Palliative Sedation Be Instructive?Jeffrey T. Berger - 2017 - Hastings Center Report 47 (1):20-23.
    With narrow exception, physicians’ treatment of incapacitated patients requires the consent of health surrogates. Although the decision-making authority of surrogates is appropriately broad, their moral authority is not without limits. Discerning these bounds is particularly germane to ethically complex treatments and has important implications for the welfare of patients, for the professional integrity of clinicians, and, in fact, for the welfare of surrogates. Palliative sedation is one such complex treatment; as such, it provides a valuable model for analyzing the scope (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
1 — 50 / 6096