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  1. Green Anarchy: Deep Ecology and Primitivism.Elisa Aaltola - 2011 - In Benjamin Franks & Matthew Wilson (eds.), Anarchism and Moral Philosophy. Palgrave MacMillan.
    Radical environmental discourse often contains anarchic elements. These elements include criticism of authoritarian politics and capitalism, and an emphasis on collectivism, individual freedom and self-fulfilment. These anarchic tendencies have increasingly led to the use of the term ‘green anarchism’. This chapter investigates two versions of radical environmental discourse, which have included, or have been used to support, ideas familiar to green anarchism: deep ecology and primitivism. The aim is to bring forward their main premises, explore the similarities between the two, (...)
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  2. Ecosophies, la Philosophie à l'Épreuve de L'Écologie.Hicham-Stéphane Afeissa (ed.) - 2009 - Mf.
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  3. The Brundtland Report, P.Joseph Agassi - manuscript
    Why are the efforts at coordination so feeble? Unless we face this question, we may never see progress. The answer is not hard to find. Decisions on matters of life and death are awesome; decisions on some awesome questions are guided by accepted laws, rules or customs; other awesome questions are open. Obviously, having to decide on an open, awesome question is a hardship in every possible manner: intellectually and practically, legally and morally, socially and psychologically. People are reluctant to (...)
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  4. Is Deep Ecology Too Radical?William Aiken - 1994 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 1 (4):1-5.
    The theory of Deep Ecology is characterized as having two essential features: the belief that nature is inherently valuable, and the belief that one’s self is truly realized by identification with nature. Four common but different meanings of the term “radical” are presented. Whether the theory of Deep Ecology is “too radical” depends upon which of these meanings one is using.
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  5. The Natural World: Naess, Doμgen, and the Question of Limits.Ermine L. Algaier Iv - 2015 - Environmental Ethics 37 (1):99-118.
    Juxtaposing the ecological insights of Arne Naess and Eihei Dōgen, Deane Curtin maintains that Dōgen’s metaphysical conception of sentience subsumes and corrects Naess’s ecologi­cal Self and its problem of limits. However, an alternative reading of Dōgen, one which deemphasizes the ontological status of the natural world in favor of how we epistemically view it, revitalizes Naess’s question of limits and enables us to reappropriate the problem as our problem. This line of thinking forces us to rethink how we relate to (...)
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  6. Deep Ecology and Heideggerian Phenomenology.Matthew Antolick - unknown
    This thesis examines the connections between Arne Naess's Deep Ecology and Martin Heidegger's Phenomenology. The latter provides a philosophical basis for the former. Martin Heidegger's critique of traditional metaphysics and his call for an "event" ontology that is deeper than the traditional substance ontology opens a philosophical space in which a different conception of what it is to be emerges. Heidegger's view of humans also provides a basis for the wider and deeper conception of self Arne Naess seeks: one that (...)
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  7. Deep Technology Environmental Ethics: An Alternative to Deep Ecology.Ralph Joseph Argen - 1994 - Dissertation, State University of New York at Buffalo
    There is no need for objective values to create an environmental ethic. The case against objective values is not new, but its force is generally ignored by advocates of environmentalism. These arguments in conjunction with an error theory that explains how the false belief in objective value is built into moral language form the case against objective values. The error theory also shows that deep ecology environmentalism is a regressive, repressive, religious dogma rather than philosophy or ethics. The intuitions of (...)
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  8. Depth, Trusteeship, and Redistribution.Robin Attfield - 1999 - The Proceedings of the Twentieth World Congress of Philosophy 1:159-168.
    I review some themes of Naess’s “The Shallow and the Deep, Long-Range Ecology Movements” article and Routley’s “Is there a Need for a New, An Environmental Ethic?” presentation at the 1973 World Congress. Naess’s affiliation to the Deep Ecology Movement deserves acclaim, theoretic entanglements notwithstanding. Routley advocated a new ethic because no Judaeo-Christian ethical tradition could cope with widespread environmental intuitions. However, the ethical tradition of stewardship can satisfy such concerns. It is compatible with environmental values, need not be managerial, (...)
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  9. Sylvan, Fox and Deep Ecology: A View From the Continental Shelf.Robin Attfield - 1993 - Environmental Values 2 (1):21 - 32.
    Both Richard Sylvan’s trenchant critique of Deep Ecology and Warwick Fox’s illuminating reinterpretation and defence are presented and appraised. Besides throwing light on the nature and the prospects of the defence of Deep Ecology and of its diverse axiological, epistemological and metaphysical strands, the appraisal discloses the range of normative positions open to those who reject anthropocentrism, of which Deep Ecology is no more than one (and, if Fox’s account of its nature is right, may not be one at all). (...)
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  10. Deep Ecology and Intrinsic Value.Robin Attfield - 1990 - Cogito 4 (1):61-66.
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  11. Deep Ecology and Intrinsic Value: A Reply to Andrew Dobson.Robin Attfield - 1990 - Cogito 4 (1):61-6.
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  12. The Misbegotten Child of Deep Ecology.Stephen Avery - 2004 - Environmental Values 13 (1):31-50.
    This paper offers a critical examination of efforts to use Heidegger's thought to illuminate deep ecology. It argues that deep ecology does not entail a non-anthropocentric or ecocentric environmental ethic; rather, it is best understood as offering an ontological critique of the current environmental crisis, from a perspective of deep anthropocentrism.
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  13. A Neo-Hegelian, Feminist, Psychoanalytic Perspective on Ecology.I. D. Balbus - 1982 - Télos 1982 (52):140-155.
  14. Codepoiesis – the Deep Logic of Life.Marcello Barbieri - 2012 - Biosemiotics 5 (3):297-299.
  15. Ecocentrism and Persons.Brian H. Baxter - 1996 - Environmental Values 5 (3):205 - 219.
    Ecocentrism has to establish an intrinsic connection between its basic value postulate of the non-instrumental value of the nonhuman world and a conception of human flourishing, on pain of failure to motivate acceptance of its social and political prescriptions. This paper explores some ideas recently canvassed by ecocentrists such as Robyn Eckersley, designed to establish this connection – transpersonal ecology, autopoietic value theory and ecofeminism – and finds them open to objection. An alternative approach is developed which concentrates on the (...)
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  16. The Culture of Extinction: Toward a Philosophy of Deep Ecology.Frederic L. Bender - 2003 - Humanity Books.
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  17. Epilogue: The Epistemic and Practical Circle in an Evolutionary, Ecologically Sustainable Society.Donato Bergandi - 2013 - In The Structural Links between Ecology, Evolution and Ethics The Virtuous Epistemic Circle. Springer. pp. 151-158.
    Abstract In a context of human demographic, technological and economic pressure on natural systems, we face some demanding challenges. We must decide 1) whether to “preserve” nature for its own sake or to “conserve” nature because nature is essentially a reservoir of goods that are functional to humanity’s wellbeing; 2) to choose ways of life that respect the biodiversity and evolutionary potential of the planet; and, to allow all this to come to fruition, 3) to clearly define the role of (...)
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  18. The Great Work Our Way Into the Future.Thomas Mary Berry - 1999
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  19. What Does Religion Have to Say About Ecology? A New Appraisal of Naturalism.Jaco Beyers - 2016 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 15 (45):96-119.
    Humans as created matter engage with the transcendental. The difference between matter and spirit has been categorised: material and earthly existence is deemed impure and temporary. The spiritual existence is deemed of higher ethical quality. What does religion as an activity focussing on the “higher” spiritual realm have to say about the “wordly” existence of created matter? Worldviews and a religious anthropology determine the outcome. Where human existence is viewed as something other than created matter, a different relationship exists between (...)
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  20. Dialectics in the Ethics of Social Ecology.Janet Biehl - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy: From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology, Ed. Michael E. Zimmerman. Englewood Cliffs, Nj: Prentice Hall.
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  21. Standing and Stooping to Tiny Flowers.Carol Bigwood - 2004 - Environmental Philosophy 1 (2):28-45.
    Throughout the paper, I intersperse intimate movement episodes where I respond through my body and personal self to Naess. In grounding his own ecosophy, Naess makes his stand on a very certain place high up in the mountains called “Tvergastein.” His ecosophy T springs directly from his personalhome. Engaging with his texts I find I am not merely immersed in the usual way into a symbolic realm of ideas detached from my body, but have the odd feeling that I must (...)
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  22. The Mysticism of Plotinus and Deep Ecology.Donald N. Blakeley - 2004 - Journal of Philosophical Research 29:1-28.
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  23. Arne Naess, "The Pluralist and the Possibilist Aspect of the Scientific Enterprise". [REVIEW]Radu J. Bogdan - 1974 - Theory and Decision 5 (3):353.
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  24. Does the Spirit Move You? Environmental Spirituality.A. L. Booth - 1999 - Environmental Values 8 (1):89-105.
    This article looks at the idea of spirituality as it is discussed within ecophilosophical circles, particularly ecofeminism, bioregionalism, and deep ecology, as a means to improve human-nature interactions. The article also examines the use each ecophilosophy makes of a popular alternative to main-stream religion, that of Native American spiritualities, and problems inherent in adapting that alternative.
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  25. Deep Ecology, Hybrid Geographies, and Environmental Management's Relational Premise.K. I. Booth - 2013 - Environmental Values 22 (4):523-543.
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  26. Toward a Deep Social Ecology.George Bradford - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy: From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology.
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  27. How Deep is Deep Ecology? With an Essay-Review on Woman's Freedom.George Bradford - 1989
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  28. Luc Ferry's Critique of Deep Ecology, Nazi Nature Protection Laws, and Environmental Anti-Semitism.S. Bratton - 1999 - Ethics and the Environment 4 (1):3-22.
    Neo-Humanist Luc Ferry (1995) has compared deep ecology's declarations of intrinsic value in nature to the Third Reich's nature protection laws, which prohibit maltreatment of animals having "worth in themselves." Ferry's questionable approach fails to document the relationship between Nazi environmentalism and Nazi racism. German high art and mass media historically presented nature as dualistic, and portrayed Untermenschen as unnatural or inorganic. Nazi propaganda excluded Jews from nature, and identified traditional Jews as cruel to animals. Ferry's idealization of Humanism under (...)
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  29. Deep Ecology.Andrew Brennan - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  30. Relaciones recíprocas entre el Movimiento Ecología Profunda y las ciencias naturales.Alicia Irene Bugallo - 2008 - Proceedings of the Xxii World Congress of Philosophy 23:175-182.
    We highlight the deep ecology movement, inspired on ecological knowledge but mainly on the life-style of the ecological and biological field-worker. Its creator, the Norwegian philosopher Arne Naess, stresses that human and no human beings have, at least, one kind of right in common: namely the ‘right’ to express its own nature, to live and blossom. This idea shows the inspiration from perseverare in suo esse, from Baruch Spinoza’s Ethics. But beyond this Spinozan influence, the striving for expression of one’s (...)
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  31. Deep Ecology or Social Ecology?Alan Carter - 1995 - Heythrop Journal 36 (3):328–350.
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  32. Arne Naess: Ecology, Community and Lifestyle: Outline of an Ecosophy.Jim Cheney - 1991 - Environmental Ethics 13 (3):263-273.
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  33. Eco-Feminism and Deep Ecology.Jim Cheney - 1987 - Environmental Ethics 9 (2):115-145.
    l examine the degree to which the so-called “deep ecology” movement embodies a feminist sensibility. In part one I take a brief look at the ambivalent attitude of “eco-feminism” toward deep ecology. In part two I show that this ambivalence sterns largely from the fact that deep ecology assimilates feminist insights to a basically masculine ethical orientation. In part three I discuss some of the ways in which deepecology theory might change if it adopted a fundamentally feminist ethical orientation.
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  34. Environmental Ontology in Deep Ecology and Mahayana Buddhism.Chin-Fa Cheng - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):145-163.
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  35. An Almost Deep Degree.Peter Cholak, Marcia Groszek & Theodore Slaman - 2001 - Journal of Symbolic Logic 66 (2):881-901.
    We show there is a non-recursive r.e. set A such that if W is any low r.e. set, then the join W $\oplus$ A is also low. That is, A is "almost deep". This answers a question of Jockusch. The almost deep degrees form an definable ideal in the r.e. degrees (with jump.).
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  36. Deep Concerns.Noam Chomsky - unknown
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  37. How Wide is Deep Ecology?John Clark - 1996 - Inquiry 39 (2):189 – 201.
    Arne Naess's ?rules of Gandhian nonviolence? might usefully be applied to recent debates in ecophilosophy. The ?radical ecologies? have increasingly been depicted as mutually exclusive alternatives lacking any common ground, and many of the hostile and antagonistic attitudes that Naess cautions against have become prevalent. Naess suggests, however, that fundamental differences concerning theory and practice can coexist with a respect for one's opponents, an openness to the views of others, and a commitment to cooperation in the pursuit of mutually held (...)
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  38. Deep Ecology and Process Thought.John B. Cobb Jr - 2001 - Process Studies 30 (1):112-131.
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  39. Is Daoism 'Green'?David E. Cooper - 1994 - Asian Philosophy 4 (2):119 – 125.
    Abstract Contemporary advocates of ?deep ecology? often appeal to daoist ideals as an early expression of ?respect? for nature. This appeal is inspired, presumably, by daoist attacks on ?convention? or ?artifice? which, as Zhuang Zi puts it, ?has been the ruin of primordial nature ... the ruin of the world?. But there are problems with this appeal. Daoists are extremely selective in the aspects of nature which they admire, and it is as much the skilled artisan as the person ?at (...)
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  40. A State of Mind Like Water: Ecosophy T and the Buddhist Traditions.Deane Curtin - 1996 - Inquiry 39 (2):239 – 253.
    Arne Naess has come under many influences, most notably Gandhi and Spinoza. The Buddhist influence on his work, though less pervasive, provides the most direct account of key deep ecological concepts such as Self?realization and intrinsic value. I read Ecosophy T as a rigorously phenomenological branch of Deep Ecology. like early Buddhism, Naess responds to the human suffering that causes environmental destruction by challenging us to return to the reality of lived experience. This Buddhist reading clarifies, but it also complicates. (...)
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  41. Dōgen, Deep Ecology, and the Ecological Self.Deane Curtin - 1994 - Environmental Ethics 16 (2):195-213.
    A core project for deep ecologists is the reformulation of the concept of self. In searching for a more inclusive understanding of self, deep ecologists often look to Buddhist philosophy, and to the Japanese Buddhist philosopher Dōgen in particular, for inspiration. I argue that, while Dōgen does share a nondualist, nonanthropocentric framework with deep ecology, his phenomenology of the self is fundamentally at odds with the expanded Self found in the deep ecology literature. I suggest, though I do not fully (...)
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  42. Deep, Cheap, and Improvable.Peter Danielson, Rana Ahmad, Zosia Bornik, Hadi Dowlatabadi & Edwin Levy - 2007 - Journal of Philosophical Research 32 (Supplement):315-326.
    A democratic ethics of biological technology must engage the public. This is not easy to do in a way that satisfies the demands of democratic ethics, or meets the pace of rapidly changing, complex technology. This paper describes a solution proposed by the University of British Columbia’s Norms Evolving in Response to Dilemmas interdisciplinary research group. The solution, the NERD web survey, has three distinct advantages over other methods: it is Deep—the survey provides deep data, particularly when compared to alternatives (...)
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  43. Deep Interpretation.Arthur C. Danto - 1981 - Journal of Philosophy 78 (11):691-706.
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  44. The Troubled Marriage of Deep Ecology and Bioregionalism.Stewart Davidson - 2007 - Environmental Values 16 (3):313-332.
    Bioregionalism is often presented as the politics of deep ecology, or deep ecology 's social philosophy. That the ties uniting these doctrines are rarely explored can be put down to a perception amongst commentators that such links are self-evident and therefore unworthy of closer examination. By arguing that the bonds between deep ecology and bioregionalism are more tenuous than has often been assumed, this paper addresses this theoretical lacuna. There is nothing exclusive to the central tenets of deep ecology which (...)
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  45. Spinoza and Deep Ecology Challenging Traditional Approaches to Environmentalism.Eccy De Jonge - 2004
  46. Reinstating the Infinite Arne Naess and the Misappropriation of Spinoza's God.Eccy De Jonge - 2003
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  47. Where Philosophy Meets Politics the Concept of the Environment.Avner de-Shalit & Ethics &. Society Oxford Centre for the Environment - 1997 - Oxford Centre for the Environment, Ethics & Society.
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  48. The Deep, Long-Range Ecology Movement: 1960-2000--A Review.Bill Devall - 2001 - Ethics and the Environment 6 (1):18-41.
    : Aarne Naess, in a seminal paper on environmental philosophy, distinguished between two streams of environmental philosophy and activism--shallow and deep. The deep, long-range ecology movement has developed over the past four decades on a variety of fronts. However, in the context of global conferences on development, population, and environment held during the 1990s, even shallow environmentalism seems to have less priority than demands for worldwide economic growth based on trade liberalization and a free market global economy.
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  49. The Deep, Long-Range Ecology Movement 1960-2000?A Review.Bill Devall - 2001 - Ethics and the Environment 6 (1):18-41.
    Aame Naess, in a seminal paper on environmental philosophy, distinguished between two streams of environmental philosophy and activism—shallow and deep. The deep, long-range ecology movement has developed over the past four decades on a variety of fronts. However, in the context of global conferences on development, population, and environment held during the 1990s, even shallow environmentalism seems to have less priority than demands for worldwide economic growth based on trade liberalization and a free market global economy.
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  50. Simple in Means, Rich in Ends Practicing Deep Ecology.Bill Devall - 1988
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