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  1. Dialectics in the Ethics of Social Ecology.Janet Biehl - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy: From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology, Ed. Michael E. Zimmerman. Englewood Cliffs, Nj: Prentice Hall.
  2. Toward a Deep Social Ecology.George Bradford - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy: From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology.
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  3. Deep Ecology: A New Philosophy of Our Time?Warwick Fox - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  4. Demystifying the Critiques of Deep Ecology.Harold Glasser - forthcoming - Environmental Philosophy: From Animal Rights to Radical Ecology. Upper Saddle River, Nj: Prentice Hall.
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  5. Could Humans Dwell Beyond the Earth? Thinking with Heidegger on Space Colonization and the Topology of Technology.Onur Karamercan - forthcoming - Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment.
    In this article, the idea of space colonization is critically examined by drawing from Martin Heidegger’s topological philosophy of technology and dwelling. Heidegger’s ideas from his 1966 interview with German journal Der Spiegel are examined in light of his relevant philosophical texts to interpret his claims concerning The Blue Marble image. This article defends the view that Heidegger does not take a moral stance against space colonization as such; rather, he elucidates the existential grounds of our relation to modern technology, (...)
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  6. Ii. The Land Ethio and Deep Ecology.Aldo Leopold - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics.
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  7. 28 The Heart of Deep Ecology.Andrew McLaughlin - forthcoming - Environmental Ethics: The Big Questions.
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  8. The Self in Deep Ecology: A Response to Watson.Joshua Anderson - 2020 - Asian Philosophy 30 (1):30-39.
    Richard Watson maintains that deep ecology suffers from an internal contradiction and should therefore be rejected. Watson contends that deep ecology claims to be non-anthropocentric while at the same time is committed to setting humans apart from nature, which is inherently anthropocentric. I argue that Watson’s objection arises out of a fundamental misunderstanding of how deep ecologist’s conceive of the ‘Self.’ Drawing on resources from Buddhism, I offer an understanding of the ‘Self’ that is fully consistent with deep ecology, and (...)
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  9. The Unfolding of a New Vision of Life, Cosmos and Evolution.Agustin Ostachuk - 2020 - Ludus Vitalis 28 (53):81-83.
    Has science already answered the fundamental questions about the concepts of Life, Cosmos and Evolution? Has science not relegated these fundamental questions by following up on more immediate, “useful” and practical endeavors that ultimately ensure that the wheel of capitalism keeps spinning in its frantic search for material and economic progress? There is something terribly wrong with the current theory of evolution, understood as the Darwinian theory with its successive versions and extensions. The concept of natural selection, the cornerstone of (...)
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  10. A Theory of Evolution as a Process of Unfolding.Agustin Ostachuk - 2020 - Cosmos and History: The Journal of Natural and Social Philosophy 16 (1):347-379.
    In this work I propose a theory of evolution as a process of unfolding. This theory is based on four logically concatenated principles. The principle of evolutionary order establishes that the more complex cannot be generated from the simpler. The principle of origin establishes that there must be a maximum complexity that originates the others by logical deduction. Finally, the principle of unfolding and the principle of actualization guarantee the development of the evolutionary process from the simplest to the most (...)
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  11. Whitehead’s Panpsychism and Deep Ecology.Leemon McHenry - 2019 - In Demian Wheeler & David Connor (eds.), Conceiving an Alternative: Philosophical Resources for an Ecological Civilization. Anoka, MN, USA: Process Century. pp. 229-251.
    This essay examines A. N. Whitehead’s philosophy of organism as a basis for an ecological ethics. His views are compared with those of deep ecologists and several problems with his panpsychism are considered in connection with the notion of intrinsic value in nature. In spite of problems raised by critics, this essay concludes that Whitehead’s philosophy provides a world view that offers a corrective to the disastrous course set by views that regard nature as an inert mechanism.
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  12. Jainism and Environmental Ethics: An Exploration.Piyali Mitra - 2019 - Journal of Indian Council of Philosophical Research 36 (1):3-22.
    In this paper, an attempt has been made to examine some of the key concepts of Jaina religion from an environmental perspective. The paper focuses on Jain’s parasparopagraho jīvānām or interconnectedness. The common concerns between Jainism and environmentalism constituted in a mutual sensitivity towards living beings, a recognition of the interconnectedness of life forms and a programme to augment awareness to respect and protect living systems. The paper will also investigate how ahiṃsā or non-violence is understood in the Jain community (...)
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  13. The Organism and its Umwelt: A Counterpoint Between the Theories of Uexküll, Goldstein and Canguilhem.Agustin Ostachuk - 2019 - In Jakob von Uexküll and Philosophy: Life, Environments, Anthropology. Londres, Reino Unido: pp. 158-171.
    The topic of the relationship between the organism and its environment runs through the theories of Uexküll, Goldstein and Canguilhem with equal importance. In this work a counterpoint will be established between their theories, in the attempt to assess at which points the melodies are concordant and at which points they are discordant. As fundamental basis to his theory, Uexküll relies on the concept of conformity to a plan, which allows him to account for the congruity and perfect adjustment between (...)
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  14. The Anthropocentrism of the Cosmic Perspective Argument.Seth Sivinski & Joseph Ulatowski - 2019 - Ethics and the Environment 24 (1):1-19.
    New developments in cosmology make it unlikely that life on Earth is unique. The Cosmic Perspective Argument states that given these developments we should not be concerned with the Earth’s environmental degradation. In this paper, we argue that although scaling our analysis upwards into the cosmos provides the Cosmic Perspective with its strength, when we apply the Cosmic Perspective downwards, the view appears to be terribly flawed. After examining the Cosmic Perspective at an individual level the problems that arise intensify (...)
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  15. An Eco-Poetic Approach to Architecture Across Boundaries.Claudia Westermann - 2019 - In Teresa Hoskyns (ed.), International Conference: Architecture Across Boundaries. Dubai, UAE: pp. 281–291.
    As highlighted by the post-Cartesian discourse across philosophical schools, Western thought had been struggling for a long time with conceiving interconnectedness. The problematic of Western dualism is most apparent with the so-called mind-body problem, but the issue does not only relate to the separation of body and mind but also the separation of living beings from their environments. Asian philosophy, on the other hand, has had a long history of thinking relations. The paper argues that an architectural philosophy that is (...)
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  16. The Christian Environmental Ethos as a More Sustainable Answer to the Ecological Problems in the Anthropocene.Anto Čartolovni - 2018 - Filozofska Istrazivanja 37 (4):779-796.
    In contemporary age, human beings reached the conclusion that they are the main driving force responsible for the changes to our planet and that they are the originator of the new era of Anthropocene, in contrast to the recent era of Holocene in which nature possessed certain autonomy. The incurred changes are the consequence of human technological progress leading to further deterioration. The development of this new concept is tightly connected not only with the prevention of further deterioration of the (...)
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  17. Life: the Center of our Existence.Agustin Ostachuk - 2018 - Ludus Vitalis 26 (50):257-260.
    Life is the center of our existence. One would be tempted to say that first of all we live. However, our existence does not seem to pass in that modality. The exacerbated materialism in which our existence takes place, displaces life from the center of the scene. Our society is organized around production, consumerism, exploitation, efficiency, trade and propaganda. That is to say, our existence seems to have economy as the center of organization of our activities. The struggle of this (...)
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  18. How Destructive Are the Rich, or is J.K. Rowling More Evil Than Me?Michael Starks - 2018 - In Suicidal Utopian Delusions in the 21st Century : Philosophy, Human Nature and the Collapse of Civilization- Articles and Reviews 2006-2019 3rd revised Edition. Las Vegas, Nevada, USA: Reality Press. pp. 202-207.
    How about a different take on the rich and famous? First the obvious—the Harry Potter novels are primitive superstition that encourages children to believe in fantasy rather than take responsibility for the world-- the norm of course. JKR is just as clueless about herself and the world as all the other monkeys, but about 200 times as destructive as the average American and about 800 times more than the average Chinese. She has been responsible for the destruction of maybe 30,000 (...)
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  19. Norton Versus Callicott on Interpreting Aldo Leopold: A Jamesian View.Piers Stephens - 2018 - In Ben Minteer & Sahotra Sarkar (eds.), A Sustainable Philosophy—the Work of Bryan Norton. Springer Verlag. pp. 113-133.
    Since Bryan Norton first advocated an American pragmatist reading of Aldo Leopold’s work in 1988, he has been debating with J. Baird Callicott over interpretation of Leopold’s development of the land ethic. In this chapter I give an overview of this debate, defending the general outlines of Norton’s position by bringing in new interpretative work of my own. I argue firstly that Norton is correct to see a Jamesian pragmatist influence on Leopold, but maintain that this is best read as (...)
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  20. Environmental Ethics and Behavioural Change.Benjamin Franks, Stuart Hanscomb & Sean F. Johnston - 2017 - Routledge.
    Environmental Ethics and Behavioural Change takes a practical approach to environmental ethics with a focus on its transformative potential for students, professionals, policy makers, activists, and concerned citizens. Proposed solutions to issues such as climate change, resource depletion and accelerating extinctions have included technological fixes, national and international regulation and social marketing. This volume examines the ethical features of a range of communication strategies and technological, political and economic methods for promoting ecologically responsible practice in the face of these crises. (...)
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  21. Review of A Brief History of Everything by Ken Wilber (1996).Michael Starks - 2017 - Philosophy, Human Nature and the Collapse of Civilization Michael Starks 3rd Ed. (2017).
    The Einstein of the New Age holds forth in his unique and brilliant style on the history of world views and how to put spirit back in our life. If you have the patience to learn his jargon and read slowly there is alot of serious brainfood here. I read this and his Sex, Ecology and Spirituality(1995) with Hofstadter´s famous Godel, Escher, Bach(GEB) written in 1980(both of which I have reviewed here). Wilber´s work has many parallels with GEB, both of (...)
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  22. What Does Religion Have to Say About Ecology? A New Appraisal of Naturalism.Jaco Beyers - 2016 - Journal for the Study of Religions and Ideologies 15 (45):96-119.
    Humans as created matter engage with the transcendental. The difference between matter and spirit has been categorised: material and earthly existence is deemed impure and temporary. The spiritual existence is deemed of higher ethical quality. What does religion as an activity focussing on the “higher” spiritual realm have to say about the “wordly” existence of created matter? Worldviews and a religious anthropology determine the outcome. Where human existence is viewed as something other than created matter, a different relationship exists between (...)
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  23. Environmental Ontology in Deep Ecology and Mahayana Buddhism.Chin-Fa Cheng - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (2):145-163.
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  24. Is It Possible to Care for Ecosystems? Policy Paralysis and Ecosystem Management.Robert K. Garcia & Jonathan A. Newman - 2016 - Ethics, Policy and Environment 19 (2):170-182.
    Conservationists have two types of arguments for why we should conserve ecosystems: instrumental and intrinsic value arguments. Instrumental arguments contend that we ought to conserve ecosystems because of the benefits that humans, or other morally relevant individuals, derive from ecosystems. Conservationists are often loath to rely too heavily on the instrumental argument because it could potentially force them to admit that some ecosystems are not at all useful to humans, or that if they are, they are not more useful than (...)
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  25. Deep Incarnation: From Deep History to Post-Axial Religion.Niels Henrik Gregersen - 2016 - Hts Theological Studies 72 (4):1-12.
    This article presents in broad outline the theological concept of deep incarnation and brings it into dialogue with correlative ideas of deep history and deep sociality. It will be argued that neither Christology, nor evolution, can be properly understood from a chronocentric perspective. Evolution is not only about development but also about the exploration of ecospace. Likewise, a contemporary Christology should explicate incarnation as a divine assumption of the full ecospace of the material world of creation. It will then be (...)
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  26. Is Broad the New Deep in Environmental Ethics? A Comparison of Broad Ecological Justice and Deep Ecology. Kortetmäki - 2016 - Ethics and the Environment 21 (1):89-108.
    There are different views on which issues can be considered as questions of justice. Until rather recently, the distributive paradigm, or the view that justice is primarily and mostly an issue of distributing certain goods, has dominated the discussion in social justice. Today, distributive paradigm has been challenged by the idea that justice also has other important dimensions such as recognition—the ‘cultural’ dimension of justice that concerns respect and social relations—and participation, the ‘political’ dimension. I propose that this multidimensional approach (...)
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  27. On the Enduring Importance of Deep Ecology.Tony Lynch & Stephen Norris - 2016 - Environmental Ethics 38 (1):63-75.
    It is common to hear that deep ecology “has reached its logical conclusion and exhausted itself” in a vacuous anthropomorphism and absurd nonanthropocentrism. These conclusions should be rejected. Properly understood, neither objection poses a serious problem for deep ecology so much as for the ethic of “ecological holism” which some philosophers—wrongly—have taken to arise from deep ecology. Deep ecology is not such an ethic, but is best understood as an aesthetically articulated conception of what, following Robinson Jeffers, may be called (...)
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  28. Foraging Behavior of Fire Ant Solenopsis Saevissima (Smith) (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) in Felis Catus Linnaeus (Carnivora: Felidae) Carcass.Tatiane Tagliatti Maciel, Bruno Corrêa Barbosa & Fabio Prezoto - 2016 - Sociobiology 62 (4).
    Solenopsis saevissima fire ants were found foraging in a Felis catus carcass over tissues an secretions present in holes and mucosa. The ants built a dirt-made physical structure around the carcass, which prevented necrophagous flies from laying eggs or larvae in the body. These observations are relevant to increasing knowledge on the role of this ant genus in the decaying process of other animal corpses, including humans.
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  29. Deep Ecology, the Holistic Critique of Enlightenment Dualism, and the Irony of History.Andy Scerri - 2016 - Environmental Values 25 (5):527-551.
    In the 1970s, deep ecologists developed a radical normative argument for ‘ecological consciousness’ to challenge environmental and human exploita- tion. Such consciousness would replace the Enlightenment dualist ‘illusion’ with a post-Enlightenment holism that ‘fully integrated’ humanity within the ecosphere. By the 2000s, deep ecology had fallen out of favour with many green scholars. And, in 2014, it was described as a ‘spent force’. However, this decline has coincided with calls by influential advocates of ‘corporate social and environmental responsibility’ (CSER) and (...)
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  30. On “Self-Realization” – The Ultimate Norm of Arne Naess’s Ecosophy T.Md Munir Hossain Talukder - 2016 - Symposion: Theoretical and Applied Inquiries in Philosophy and Social Sciences 3 (2):219-235.
    This paper considers the foundation of self-realization and the sense of morality that could justify Arne Naess’s claim ‘Self-realization is morally neutral,’ by focusing on the recent debate among deep ecologists. Self-realization, the ultimate norm of Naess’s ecosophy T, is the realization of the maxim ‘everything is interrelated.’ This norm seems to be based on two basic principles: the diminishing of narrow ego, and the integrity between the human and non-human worlds. The paper argues that the former is an extension (...)
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  31. The Natural World: Naess, Doμgen, and the Question of Limits.Ermine L. Algaier Iv - 2015 - Environmental Ethics 37 (1):99-118.
    Juxtaposing the ecological insights of Arne Naess and Eihei Dōgen, Deane Curtin maintains that Dōgen’s metaphysical conception of sentience subsumes and corrects Naess’s ecologi­cal Self and its problem of limits. However, an alternative reading of Dōgen, one which deemphasizes the ontological status of the natural world in favor of how we epistemically view it, revitalizes Naess’s question of limits and enables us to reappropriate the problem as our problem. This line of thinking forces us to rethink how we relate to (...)
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  32. Heidegger's Support for Deep Ecology Reexamined Once Again: Ontological Egalitarianism, or Farewell to the Great Chain of Being. Holy-Luczaj - 2015 - Ethics and the Environment 20 (1):45-66.
    It is said an attempt to reconcile Heidegger's ontology with the position of deep ecology finds the going rugged. Yet, I believe it is worth hiking this path once again to reexamine the connections between deep ecology and the philosophy of Martin Heidegger. Significantly, we will see the importance of Heidegger's critique of the idea of the great chain of being.Taking the perspective of deep ecology requires us to consider whether Heidegger's being-centered approach can indeed justify “the equality of right (...)
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  33. Review of Samuel Alexander and Amanda McLeod , Simple Living in History: Pioneers of the Deep Future[REVIEW]John Nolt - 2015 - Environmental Values 24 (5):692-694.
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  34. Ecology Re-Naturalized.Leon Niemoczynski - 2014 - In Leon Niemoczynski Nam T. Nguyen (ed.), A Philosophy of Sacred Nature: Prospects for Ecstatic Naturalism. Lexington Books. pp. 113-127.
  35. From Particular Times and Spaces to Metaphysics of Leopold´s Ethics of the Land.Guido J. M. Verstraeten & Willem W. Verstraeten - 2014 - Asian Journal of Humanities and Social Studies (No 1).
    Modern rationalism transformed the modern homeland to a discursive space and time by means of institutes governing the modern society in all its walks. Based on the Newtonian and Kantian conception of space and time the discursive field is just a scene wherein any human individual adopts stewardship to create progress by reducing landscape and non-human life to auxiliary items for human’s benefit. In contrast, Aldo Leopold considered humans, non human life and the landscape as mutually influencing participants and enlarged (...)
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  36. Epilogue: The Epistemic and Practical Circle in an Evolutionary, Ecologically Sustainable Society.Donato Bergandi - 2013 - In Bergandi, Donato (ed.), The Structural Links between Ecology, Evolution and Ethics The Virtuous Epistemic Circle. Springer. pp. 151-158.
    Abstract In a context of human demographic, technological and economic pressure on natural systems, we face some demanding challenges. We must decide 1) whether to “preserve” nature for its own sake or to “conserve” nature because nature is essentially a reservoir of goods that are functional to humanity’s wellbeing; 2) to choose ways of life that respect the biodiversity and evolutionary potential of the planet; and, to allow all this to come to fruition, 3) to clearly define the role of (...)
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  37. Deep Ecology, Hybrid Geographies, and Environmental Management's Relational Premise.Kate I. Booth - 2013 - Environmental Values 22 (4):523-543.
    The premise of environmental management pivots on managing the people-environment relationship. Yet this field remains dominated by the idea of managing the environment not the relationship, and as such continues to enact dualistic and reductionist traditions. Deep ecology's relational ontology offers a means of moving beneath and beyond such traditions. Specifically, the theory of internal relations as manifest within Arne Naess's gestalt ontology - if developed with regard to relational work emerging within cultural geography - is an aspect of deep (...)
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  38. Deep Ecology.Andrew Brennan - 2013 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), The International Encyclopedia of Ethics. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  39. Toward an Ecological and Cosmonautical Philosophy.Joseph Kirby - 2013 - Journal of Evolution and Technology 23 (1):1-13.
    Beginning as pockets of anaerobic bacteria subsisting on geothermal energy on the ocean floor, life expanded first throughout the ocean, then over the land, and eventually came to cover the entire Earth. In this paper, I argue that human activity in outer space should be understood in the context of this progression: life as an exponentially expanding force of negentropy currently contained within the atmosphere of the earth, and human technology as a radical transformation whereby life becomes capable of expanding (...)
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  40. For They Do Not Agree In Nature: Spinoza and Deep Ecology.Gal Kober - 2013 - Ethics and the Environment 18 (1):43-65.
    In the Ethics,1 Spinoza presents a rigorous naturalistic view of man and nature. Man is a part of nature, a subject of the same domain—not a domain separate from it, nor a domain within that of nature. Man cannot act against nature or in an unnatural way; in comparison with any other part or creature of nature, man is not special, more important or qualitatively different. All general laws of nature apply equally to animals, inanimate objects, humans, God, the mind, (...)
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  41. Neurath’s Congestions, Depth of Intention, and Precization: Arne Naess and His Viennese Heritage.Jan Radler - 2013 - Hopos: The Journal of the International Society for the History of Philosophy of Science 3 (1):59-90.
    In recent years, a significant amount of research has investigated the Vienna Circle’s ramifications. Otto Neurath has received much attention as one of the most prominent and energetic adherents, but less conspicuous philosophers now find themselves at the center of historical research. This article’s aim is to investigate Arne Naess’s connection to Logical Empiricism. Two crucial influences on Naess’s work are identified: Otto Neurath and the psychologist Egon Brunswik. This article’s most significant contributions are that, from the perspective of a (...)
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  42. Codepoiesis – the Deep Logic of Life.Marcello Barbieri - 2012 - Biosemiotics 5 (3):297-299.
  43. Is Deep Ecology a Realistic Policy Goal?Prabhu Venkataraman & Devartha Morang - 2012 - Philosophy for Business 73.
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  44. Green Anarchy: Deep Ecology and Primitivism.Elisa Aaltola - 2011 - In Benjamin Franks & Matthew Wilson (eds.), Anarchism and Moral Philosophy. Palgrave MacMillan.
    Radical environmental discourse often contains anarchic elements. These elements include criticism of authoritarian politics and capitalism, and an emphasis on collectivism, individual freedom and self-fulfilment. These anarchic tendencies have increasingly led to the use of the term ‘green anarchism’. This chapter investigates two versions of radical environmental discourse, which have included, or have been used to support, ideas familiar to green anarchism: deep ecology and primitivism. The aim is to bring forward their main premises, explore the similarities between the two, (...)
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  45. Arne Dekke Eide Naess: 27 January 1912 – 12 January 2009 Founding Editor of Inquiry.Kristian Bjørkdahl & Wayne Martin - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (1):1-1.
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  46. Naess's Deep Ecology: Implications for the Human Prospect and Challenges for the Future.Harold Glasser - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (1):52-77.
    What sets Naess's deep ecology apart from most inquiries into environmental philosophy is that it does not seek a radical shift in fundamental values. Naess offered a utopian, life-affirming grand narrative, a new Weltanschauung that shifted the focus of inquiry to coupling values, knowledge, understanding, and wisdom to behavior. The core of Naess's approach is that sustainability hinges on developing more thoroughly reasoned and consistent views, policies, and actions, which are tied back to wide-identifying ultimate norms and a rich, well-informed (...)
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  47. “A Kind of Metaphysician”: Arne Naess From Logical Empiricism to Ecophilosophy.Thomas Uebel - 2011 - Inquiry: An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 54 (1):78-109.
    ABSTRACT Arne Naess once called himself ?a kind of metaphysician?: did or did he not therewith turn his back on his philosophical mentors in the Vienna Circle? To try to determine the meaning of this self-ascription, this paper first considers in detail two works in which his disagreements with the philosophers of the Vienna Circle found their clearest and most detailed expression. Concentrating on Carnap it will be argued that while some of Naess's criticisms cannot be taken as authoritative, he (...)
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  48. Deep Ecology.Bill Devall & George Sessions - 2010 - In Craig Hanks (ed.), Technology and Values: Essential Readings. Wiley-Blackwell.
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  49. Was Arne Naess Recognized as the Founder of Deep Ecology Prematurely? Semantics and Environmental Philosophy.Benjamin Howe - 2010 - Environmental Ethics 32 (4):369-383.
    According to Arne Naess, his environmental philosophy is influenced by the philosophy of language called empirical semantics, which he first developed in the 1930s as a participant in the seminars of the Vienna Circle. While no one denies his claim, most of his commentators defend views about his environmental philosophy that contradict the tenets of his semantics. In particular, they argue that he holds that deep ecology’s supporters share a world view, and that the movement’s platform articulates shared principles. Naess, (...)
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  50. Enlightened Self-Interest: In Search of the Ecological Self (A Synthesis of Stoicism and Ecosophy).Bartlomiej Lenart - 2010 - Praxis 2 (2):26-44.
    Arne Neass’ Ecosophy and the Stoic attitude towards environmental ethics are often believed to be incompatible primarily because the first is often understood as championing an ecocentric standpoint while the latter espouses an egocentric (as well as an anthropocentric) view. This paper argues that such incompatibility is rooted in a misunderstanding of both Ecosophy and Stoicism. Moreover, the paper argues that a synthesis of both the Ecosophical and Stoic approaches to environmental concerns results in a robust and satisfying attitude toward (...)
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