Related categories

215 found
Order:
1 — 50 / 215
  1. Naming the Lyric: Literature Versus Philosophy in Plato's Symposium.Katherine Elkins - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):402-417.
  2. "The Politics of the Classroom Are Not the Politics of the World": An Unpublished Speech by Edward W. Said.Daniel Gordon - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (2):380-394.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. Introduction.Wang Ning - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):80-87.
    As literary scholars, we are often puzzled by these questions raised from among the reading public: What is the meaning of this literary work? How does the author express his/her intention to portray the characters or narrate the story? How shall we as literary critics interpret the meaning of the literary work? Can a certain literary work have only one meaning? Obviously this is not the case. In order to answer the above questions, we present this special cluster of articles (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. Textual Meaning in the Complex System of Literature.Zhou Xian - 2020 - Philosophy and Literature 44 (1):105-123.
    One of the most disputed issues in twentieth-century literary theories and critical studies is what literary textual meaning rests upon. A further question is whether textual meaning is ascertainable or not. The two questions are interrelated. The first one looks into the origin of textual meaning in literary texts: is it derived from authorial intent, or from sentences and rhetorical devices, or actualized in the process of readerly activities and critical interpretation? As John Searle sees it, three theories focused on (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. Peirce as a Writer.Vincent M. Colapietro - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):384-410.
    C. S. Peirce’s writings are instructive in a number of ways, not least of all for how they, in part despite themselves, assist us in conceiving what he was so strongly disposed to disparage, literary discourse. He possessed greater linguistic facility and deeper literary sensibility than he appreciated, though a militantly polemical identity helped to insure he left this facility undeveloped and this sensibility unacknowledged.2 For this and other reasons, a study of Peirce as a writer is worthwhile. It is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. The "Analytic"/"Continental" Divide and the Question of Philosophy's Relation to Literature.Andreas Vrahimis - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):253-269.
    The history of the writing of philosophy could be seen as divided between two tendencies. One tendency involves a constant reconfiguration of the literary and stylistic elements involved in the way philosophy is written. Examples include most texts in the philosophical canon, from Plato's dialogues, or Aristotle's lecture notes, to Marcus Aurelius's diary, Augustine's confessions, the pseudepigrapha of the Areopagite, Anselm's prayer, Montaigne's essays, Descartes's meditations, Kierkegaard's play with pseudonymy, or Wittgenstein's "remarks."1 In such texts, we find a self-reflective attitude (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. When Nothing Follows: Rousseau's Literary Works as Science and Consolation.Joel From - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):361-375.
    In a letter drafted at age forty-eight, Jean-Jacques Rousseau confessed that he passed his days "vainly looking for solid attachments."1 Two years later, he again lamented that he had wasted much time pursuing attachments that "did not exist."2 At age fifty-eight, he confessed that he had "always felt some void."3 And, at the very end of his life, he still bemoaned that he had been cast "into the whirlwind of the world" only to discover that he "was not made to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. "Poetry" Versus "History" in Aristotle's Poetics.David Gallop - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):420-433.
    History, according to Aristotle, relates "things that happen ; whereas poetry's function is to relate the kinds of things that happen—that is, are possible in terms of probability or necessity."1 A generic clause, expressing "the kinds of things that happen" to certain kinds of agents, distinguishes the task of the poet from that of the historian.2 History speaks of "particulars," whereas poetry speaks more of "universals." A historian might assert, for example, that Alcibiades urged the Athenians to invade Sicily, or (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. Wittgenstein and the Creativity of Language Ed. By Sebastian Sunday Grève and Jakub Mácha.Elinor Hållén - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):257-259.
    What is creativity? It is clearly something we know by seeing it manifested in a multitude of different ways and contexts. It could perhaps stand as an emblematic example of the limitations of a general explanative account. In this anthology the editors have orchestrated an exceptionally inspiring collection of essays that explore the vast examples of creative language used in Wittgenstein's philosophical practice and the creative potentiality of language overall. The anthology consists of eleven essays divided into introduction, overture, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. What Novels Speak About.Thomas Pavel - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):279-291.
    The first, easiest answer to the question "What do novels speak about?" is D. H. Lawrence's conviction that novels are about "man alive," as quoted at the beginning of Guido Mazzoni's recent book on the theory of the novel.1 In a slightly more explicit accounting, one could say that novels speak about human actions and passions. These answers are the first, because they are plausible and general. They are the easiest, because they state the obvious. And yet, precisely because they (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  11. Mapping the Literary Text: Spatio-Cultural Theory and Practice.Bill Richardson - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):67-80.
    What is the relationship between place and cultural production? How do we account for the interaction between the domain of spatiality and that of artistic expression? In particular, how might we conceptualize the connections between space and literature? Here, I attempt to map the principal ways in which the central thematic issues we associate with literary expression are related to questions about space and place. By elucidating these matters, I hope to arrive at a rationale for an approach to setting (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. Neuroscience, Narrative, and Emotion Regulation.William Seeley - 2018 - In Roger Kurtz (ed.), Trauma and Literature. New York, NY, USA: pp. 153-166.
    Recent findings in affective and cognitive neuroscience underscore the fact that traumatic memories are embodied and inextricably integrated with the affective dimensions of associated emotional responses. These findings can be used to clarify, and in some cases challenge, traditional claims about the unrepresentability of traumatic experience that have been central to trauma literary studies. The cognitive and affective dimensions experience and memory are closely integrated. Recollection is always an attenuated form of embodied reenactment. Further, situation models for narrative comprehension show (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. Antonin Artaud e la scrittura del reale. Glossolalie e disegni per un linguaggio analfabetico.Fabio Vergine - 2018 - Elephant and Castle. Laboratorio Dell'immaginario 1 (18).
    During the last ten years of his life, Antonin Artaud shows more and more intensively a multi-faceted and caustic refusal for traditional literature and the ordinary practice of writing. But above all, he shows a stylistic impatience for the alphabetic use of the word and the language. By the intention of creating an inhuman language, which could be understood also by the illiterate people, Artaud wants to undermine the significant use of the word, so that he can achieve a non-representative (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. The Consequences of Particularity.Brett Bourbon - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (2):416-430.
    A poem is not particular in the way a painting is particular. A copy of a poem is still the poem, while a copy of a painting is not the painting. But a poem is still particular, since it seems to be constituted by a specific set of words in a specific order such that to alter that order or any of those words is to make a new poem. Marianne Moore begins her poem “An Egyptian Pulled Glass Bottle in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. Conversations on Art and Aesthetics.Hans Maes - 2017 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    What is art? What counts as an aesthetic experience? Does art have to beautiful? Can one reasonably dispute about taste? What is the relation between aesthetic and moral evaluations? How to interpret a work of art? Can we learn anything from literature, film or opera? What is sentimentality? What is irony? How to think philosophically about architecture, dance, or sculpture? What makes something a great portrait? Is music representational or abstract? Why do we feel terrified when we watch a horror (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  16. The Fear of Aesthetics in Art and Literary Theory.Sam Rose - 2017 - New Literary History 48 (2):223-244.
    Is aesthetics, as has recently been claimed, now able to meet the accusations often levelled against it? This essay examines counters to three of the most common: that aesthetics is based around overly narrow conceptions of "art" and "the aesthetic"; that aesthetics is politically disengaged; and that aesthetics fails to engage with actual art objects and their histories.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. Multilevel Poetry Translation as a Problem-Solving Task.Pedro Ata & Joao Queiroz - 2016 - Cognitive Semiotics 9 (2):139-147.
    Poems are treated by translators as hierarchical multilevel systems. Here we propose the notion of “multilevel poetry translation” to characterize such cases of poetry translation in terms of selection and rebuilding of a multilevel system of constraints across languages. Different levels of a poem correspond to different sets of components that asymmetrically constrain each other (e. g., grammar, lexicon, syntactic construction, prosody, rhythm, typography, etc.). This perspective allows a poem to be approached as a thinking-tool: an “experimental lab” which submits (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. Thinking with Literature: Towards a Cognitive Criticism.Terence Cave - 2016 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Thinking with Literature offers a succinct introduction to a cognitive literary criticsm, broad in scope but focusing on a particular cluster of approaches, some of which have so far been little used. Explanatory chapters and sections alternate with close readings of literary texts from a wide range of different periods and genres. The literary readings are not mere 'examples' of cognitive topics, still less of hypotheses in cognitive science: the central argument is that cognitive criticism must draw its primary energies (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  19. Philosophy's Tragedy.Andrew Cooper - 2016 - Metaphilosophy 47 (1):59-74.
    Is tragedy, as Nietzsche declared, dead? In recent years many philosophers have reconsidered tragedy's relation to philosophy. While tragedy is deemed to contain important lessons for philosophy, there is a consensus that it remains a thing of the past. This article calls this consensus into question, arguing that it reifies tragedy, keeping tragedy at arm's length. With the interest of identifying the necessity of tragedy to philosophy, it draws from Quentin Skinner to put forward an alternative approach to genre as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. HARRISON, BERNARD What Is Fiction For? Literary Humanism Restored. Indiana University Press, 2015, Xxvi + 593 Pp., $85.00 Cloth, $35.00 Paper. [REVIEW]David Egan - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):212-215.
  21. ALTIERI, CHARLES. Reckoning with the Imagination: Wittgenstein and the Aesthetics of Literary Experience. Cornell University Press, 2015, Xii + 262 Pp., $79.95 Cloth, $28.95 Paper. [REVIEW]Richard Eldridge - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (3):306-307.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  22. Literary Style.Wolfgang Huemer - 2016 - In Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.), Routledge companion to philosophy of literature. Routledge.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. The Problem of Modernism and Critical Refusal: Bradley and Lamarque on Form/Content Unity.Owen Hulatt - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (1):47-59.
    In this article I revisit A. C. Bradley's account of form/content unity through the lens of both Peter Kivy's and Peter Lamarque's recent work on Bradley's lecture “Poetry for Poetry's Sake.” I argue that Lamarque gives a superior account of Bradley's argument. However, Lamarque claims that form/content unity should be understood as an imposition applied by the reader to poetry. Working with the counterexample of modernist poetry, I throw doubt on both this claim and some associated presuppositions found in Lamarque's (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  24. Levinas and the Plot Against Literature.Joseph G. Kronick - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):265-272.
    The remarkable interest in ethical theory shown over the last decade may simply be a return to the norms of literary scholarship. After all, ethics has dominated criticism of literature since Plato and Aristotle, and even with the emergence of formalism, in both its Russian and American varieties, ethical justifications of literature remained in place.However, the increasing influence of Emmanuel Levinas upon literary theory raises questions about the relation of ethical philosophy to literature.1 As his 1948 essay “Reality and Its (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. Neuroscience and Literature.William Seeley - 2016 - In John Gibson and Noel Carroll (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. New York, NY, USA: pp. 267-278.
    The growing general interest in understanding how neuroscience can contribute to explanations of our understanding and appreciation of art has been slow to find its way to philosophy of literature. Of course this is not to say that neuroscience has not had any influence on current theories about our engagement, understanding, and appreciation of literary works. Colin Martindale developed a scientific approach to literature in his book The Clockwork Muse (1990). His prototype-preference theory drew heavily on early artificial neural network (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. How Daring Is the Reading: Emerson's Aesthetic Reading. Boatright & Faust - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 49 (4):39-54.
    A true announcement of the law of creation, if a man were found worthy to declare it, would carry art up into the kingdom of nature, and destroy its separate and contrasted existence. The Common Core State Standards for the teaching of literature are now in effect in forty-four states and the District of Columbia. As is the case with previous standards developed at the state level since the 1990s, the Common Core State Standards are framed within a familiar formalist (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. Investigations Into the Phenomenology and the Ontology of the Work of Art: What Are Artworks and How Do We Experience Them?Peer F. Bundgaard & Frederik Stjernfelt (eds.) - 2015 - Springer Verlag.
    ​This book investigates the nature of aesthetic experience and aesthetic objects. Written by leading philosophers, psychologists, literary scholars and semioticians, the book addresses two intertwined issues. The first is related to the phenomenology of aesthetic experience: The understanding of how human beings respond to artworks, how we process linguistic or visual information, and what properties in artworks trigger aesthetic experiences. The examination of the properties of aesthetic experience reveals essential aspects of our perceptual, cognitive, and semiotic capacities. The second issue (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  28. Postcolonial Singularity and a World Literature Yet-to-Come.Lorna Burns - 2015 - Angelaki 20 (4):243-259.
    This article considers the challenge posed by Gayatri Spivak to rethink world literature along postcolonial lines as an ethical encounter with alterity. Read in this way, Spivak participates in a reframing of world literature that retains the critical gains made by postcolonial theory and suggests that the work of world literary analysis ought not necessarily be de/prescriptive but might involve a contestation of the power relations that structure the world. In developing this argument, I draw on four further perspectives: Pascale (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  29. Danto's Comic Vision: Philosophical Method and Literary Style.Noel Carroll - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):554-563.
    Arthur Danto numbers among the few contemporary philosophers whose writing is really a pleasure to read. Although rarely recognized, the source of that pleasure is Danto’s humor. His philosophical writing is consistently comic. Of course, the humor is obviously not of the knee-slapping variety. Yet it is pervasively playful.Danto will introduce a thought experiment and then explore it in several directions. Unlike many other contemporary philosophers, he is not stingy in laying out his examples. Whereas it is customary for most (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature.Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.) - 2015 - Routledge.
    _The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature_ is an in-depth examination of literature through a philosophical lens, written by distinguished figures across the major divisions of philosophy. Its 40 newly-commissioned essays are divided into six sections: historical foundations what is literature? aesthetics & appreciation meaning & interpretation metaphysics & epistemology ethics & political theory _The Companion_ opens with a comprehensive historical overview of the philosophy of literature, including chapters on the study’s ancient origins up to the 18 th -20 th (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  31. The Generalization of Holocaust Denial: Meyer Levin, William James, and the Broadway Production of The Diary of Anne Frank.James Duban - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1A):234-248.
    In his essay “Pragmatism and Humanism,” William James recalls a friend’s disappointment that the “prodigious star-group” known as the Big Dipper “should remind us Americans of nothing but a culinary utensil.”1 Such, presumably, is the fault of generalization, though James himself is less than specific in illustrating the occasional parity of varied perspectives. For example, he posits two identical equilateral triangles, one inverted and overlapping the other, and notes, “You can treat the adjoined figure as a star, as two big (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. How Literature Plays with the Brain: The Neuroscience of Reading and Art by Paul B. Armstrong.Nancy L. Easterlin - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1):267-270.
  33. Cascardi, Anthony J. The Cambridge Introduction to Literature and Philosophy. Cambridge University Press, 2014, Vii + 223 Pp., $27.99 Paper. [REVIEW]Mary Edwards - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (4):479-481.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. Philosophy and the Novel. [REVIEW]Mary Edwards - 2015 - British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (2):263-265.
  35. Acknowledging Unknowing: Stanley Cavell and the Philosophical Criticism of Literature.William Franke - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1):248-258.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. Lamarque, Peter. The Opacity of Narrative. Lanham, Maryland: Rowman & Littlefield, 2014, Xv + 213 Pp., £19.95 Paper. [REVIEW]Jonathan Gilmore - 2015 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 73 (3):349-351.
  37. Restrained Excess: Where Sophistication Meets the Grotesque.Rune Graulund - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):338-355.
    Readily conjured images of “grotesque” behavior—such as, say, vomiting on one’s plate during dinner or fornicating in public—are hard to envisage as acts of “sophistication.” In fact it seems that the grotesque constitutes the exact opposite of sophistication. For whereas the grotesque is loud and insistent, “characteristically [evoking] a sudden shock,” sophistication is characterized by that which is subdued and refined.1 Unlike the grotesque, which is to some extent defined by spectacle, sophistication is at its finest when it remains unnoticed. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  38. Introduction: On the Ground of Ethical Criticism.Garry L. Hagberg - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1A):v-vi.
    One can characterize the relation between philosophy and literature in a number of interestingly different ways: literature provides examples that put flesh on the bones of philosophical ideas; literature shows what philosophy says; literature serves philosophy by displaying the complexity of circumstance that philosophy may oversimplify; literature captures a kind of content that is not amenable to propositional encapsulation; literature offers a portal into an imaginative world and a special kind of vicarious experience within it that philosophy does not and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. Introduction: What Is Lyric Philosophy?Warren Heiti - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1):188-201.
  40. Singularity and Transnational Poetics.Birgit Kaiser (ed.) - 2015 - Routledge.
  41. The Opacity of Narrative, by Peter Lamarque. [REVIEW]Eva-Maria Konrad - 2015 - Mind 124 (496):1325-1328.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. “What Is Not Self”: Jan Zwicky, Simone Weil, and the Resonance of Decreation.Tanis MacDonald - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1):211-218.
  43. Literary Thickness.Rafe McGregor - 2015 - British Journal of Aesthetics 55 (3):343-360.
    In this paper, I shall demonstrate the value of the concept of literary thickness – i.e. form-content inseparability – as a tool of literary appreciation. I set out the relationships between non-fiction, fiction, literature, and poetry in Section 1 and sketch a preliminary definition of literary thickness in Section 2. I argue that a convincing account of reference in literary fictions can be provided by means of literary thickness in Sections 3 and 4. I argue that the match between authorial (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  44. Narrative Thickness.Rafe McGregor - 2015 - Estetika 52 (1):3-22.
    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate that the experience of a literary narrative qua literary narrative is an experience of narrative thickness, that is, an experience in which narrative form and narrative content are inseparable. I explain my thesis of poetic thickness in § 1, showing why it does not admit of extension from poetry to literary narratives. §§ 2–3 synthesize the work of Derek Attridge and Peter Lamarque, advancing narrative thickness as a necessary condition of literary narratives. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  45. Simone de Beauvoir's Theory of the Novel: The Opacity, Ambiguity, and Impartiality of Life.Yi-Ping Ong - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (2):379-405.
    Between 1946 and 1965, a period during which her contemporaries are calling into question the value of traditional novelistic realism, Simone de Beauvoir develops an extended and nuanced account of the philosophical significance of the realist novel in essays such as “Littérature et métaphysique”, “An American Renaissance in France”, and “Que peut la littérature?”. Beauvoir’s central claim is that novels do philosophical work not by articulating theoretical positions or illustrating abstract themes but by reorienting philosophical ways of understanding truth, world, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  46. 6. “Genuinely National Poetry and Prose”: Literary Philology and Literary Studies, 1800–1860.James Turner - 2015 - In Philology: The Forgotten Origins of the Modern Humanities. Princeton University Press. pp. 147-166.
  47. Alan H. Goldman, Philosophy and the Novel.Iris Vidmar - 2015 - Estetika 52 (1):122-127.
    A review of Alan H. Goldman´s Philosophy and the Novel.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. Éléments Pour Une Noétique du romanElements for a Noetics of the Novel.Pierre Vinclair - 2015 - Methodos 15.
  49. Rewriting the Death of the Author: Rancièrian Reflections.Christopher Watkin - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1):32-46.
    It is possible to study the idea of the “death of the author” as a quaint museum piece of faded 1960s structuralist memorabilia, as an idea that characterized an era that, whatever it once was, is certainly not our own. Such a presentation is the fare in countless graduate literature courses and a sin to which some, if not many, of us would plead guilty. However, the idea of the death or disappearance of the author has, since the two inaugural (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  50. The Weighing of Our Words.David Wemyss - 2015 - Philosophy and Literature 39 (1):233-242.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
1 — 50 / 215