This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

49 found
Order:
  1. added 2020-05-01
    Levinas and the Plot Against Literature.Joseph G. Kronick - 2016 - Philosophy and Literature 40 (1):265-272.
    The remarkable interest in ethical theory shown over the last decade may simply be a return to the norms of literary scholarship. After all, ethics has dominated criticism of literature since Plato and Aristotle, and even with the emergence of formalism, in both its Russian and American varieties, ethical justifications of literature remained in place.However, the increasing influence of Emmanuel Levinas upon literary theory raises questions about the relation of ethical philosophy to literature.1 As his 1948 essay “Reality and Its (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  2. added 2020-05-01
    Literature, Genre Fiction, and Standards of Criticism.James Harold - 2011 - Nonsite.Org 1 (4).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  3. added 2020-05-01
    The Nature of Fiction.Susan L. Feagin - 1992 - Philosophical Review 101 (4):948.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   132 citations  
  4. added 2020-04-27
    Literature as Negative Theology: The Literary Absolute (1988) and Jean-Luc Nancy's Philosophical Method.Jack Robert June Edmunds-Coopey - manuscript
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. added 2020-04-27
    Mapping the Literary Text: Spatio-Cultural Theory and Practice.Bill Richardson - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):67-80.
    What is the relationship between place and cultural production? How do we account for the interaction between the domain of spatiality and that of artistic expression? In particular, how might we conceptualize the connections between space and literature? Here, I attempt to map the principal ways in which the central thematic issues we associate with literary expression are related to questions about space and place. By elucidating these matters, I hope to arrive at a rationale for an approach to setting (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  6. added 2020-04-27
    Neuroscience, Narrative, and Emotion Regulation.William Seeley - 2018 - In Roger Kurtz (ed.), Trauma and Literature. New York, NY, USA: pp. 153-166.
    Recent findings in affective and cognitive neuroscience underscore the fact that traumatic memories are embodied and inextricably integrated with the affective dimensions of associated emotional responses. These findings can be used to clarify, and in some cases challenge, traditional claims about the unrepresentability of traumatic experience that have been central to trauma literary studies. The cognitive and affective dimensions experience and memory are closely integrated. Recollection is always an attenuated form of embodied reenactment. Further, situation models for narrative comprehension show (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. added 2020-04-27
    Wittgenstein and the Creativity of Language Ed. By Sebastian Sunday Grève and Jakub Mácha.Elinor Hållén - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (1):257-259.
    What is creativity? It is clearly something we know by seeing it manifested in a multitude of different ways and contexts. It could perhaps stand as an emblematic example of the limitations of a general explanative account. In this anthology the editors have orchestrated an exceptionally inspiring collection of essays that explore the vast examples of creative language used in Wittgenstein's philosophical practice and the creative potentiality of language overall. The anthology consists of eleven essays divided into introduction, overture, and (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  8. added 2020-04-27
    What Novels Speak About.Thomas Pavel - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):279-291.
    The first, easiest answer to the question "What do novels speak about?" is D. H. Lawrence's conviction that novels are about "man alive," as quoted at the beginning of Guido Mazzoni's recent book on the theory of the novel.1 In a slightly more explicit accounting, one could say that novels speak about human actions and passions. These answers are the first, because they are plausible and general. They are the easiest, because they state the obvious. And yet, precisely because they (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. added 2020-04-27
    How Can Each Word Be Irreplaceable?: Is Coleridge's Claim Absurd?Paul Magee - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (2):400-415.
    One often hears a version of the following: “A poem is never finished, just abandoned.” I have always found this proposition irksome. The fact that Paul Valéry seems to be the source of it, in something like the above form, makes me feel a certain trepidation in writing this. But I do find myself thinking, when I hear people say that their poems are never finished, only abandoned: why don’t you just finish them? I want a poem to be finished. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  10. added 2020-04-27
    Conversations on Art and Aesthetics.Hans Maes - 2017 - Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press.
    What is art? What counts as an aesthetic experience? Does art have to beautiful? Can one reasonably dispute about taste? What is the relation between aesthetic and moral evaluations? How to interpret a work of art? Can we learn anything from literature, film or opera? What is sentimentality? What is irony? How to think philosophically about architecture, dance, or sculpture? What makes something a great portrait? Is music representational or abstract? Why do we feel terrified when we watch a horror (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  11. added 2020-04-27
    The Consequences of Particularity.Brett Bourbon - 2017 - Philosophy and Literature 41 (2):416-430.
    A poem is not particular in the way a painting is particular. A copy of a poem is still the poem, while a copy of a painting is not the painting. But a poem is still particular, since it seems to be constituted by a specific set of words in a specific order such that to alter that order or any of those words is to make a new poem. Marianne Moore begins her poem “An Egyptian Pulled Glass Bottle in (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. added 2020-04-27
    Neuroscience and Literature.William Seeley - 2016 - In John Gibson and Noel Carroll (ed.), The Routledge Companion to Philosophy of Literature. New York, NY, USA: pp. 267-278.
    The growing general interest in understanding how neuroscience can contribute to explanations of our understanding and appreciation of art has been slow to find its way to philosophy of literature. Of course this is not to say that neuroscience has not had any influence on current theories about our engagement, understanding, and appreciation of literary works. Colin Martindale developed a scientific approach to literature in his book The Clockwork Muse (1990). His prototype-preference theory drew heavily on early artificial neural network (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. added 2020-04-27
    Text + Work: The Menard Case.Tomas Koblizek, Petr Kot'átko & Martin Pokorný (eds.) - 2013 - Litteraria Pragensia.
    The influence and reputation of Pierre Menard, Author of the Quixote, is easily comparable to the impact of groundbreaking theoretical texts. Numerous philosophers, aestheticians and theorists of literature, music, or visual arts have been induced by this short story by J.L. Borges to reconsider the status of the literary work of art, to rethink the relationship between work and text. The essays collected here move from analyses of the identity of the literary work of art, as it is explicitly established (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. added 2020-04-27
    The Spectator-Participant Distinction: An Impasse for Educational Literary Theory?R. A. Goodrich - 1995 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 29 (1):47.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. added 2020-01-13
    When Nothing Follows: Rousseau's Literary Works as Science and Consolation.Joel From - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):361-375.
    In a letter drafted at age forty-eight, Jean-Jacques Rousseau confessed that he passed his days "vainly looking for solid attachments."1 Two years later, he again lamented that he had wasted much time pursuing attachments that "did not exist."2 At age fifty-eight, he confessed that he had "always felt some void."3 And, at the very end of his life, he still bemoaned that he had been cast "into the whirlwind of the world" only to discover that he "was not made to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. added 2020-01-13
    "Poetry" Versus "History" in Aristotle's Poetics.David Gallop - 2018 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):420-433.
    History, according to Aristotle, relates "things that happen ; whereas poetry's function is to relate the kinds of things that happen—that is, are possible in terms of probability or necessity."1 A generic clause, expressing "the kinds of things that happen" to certain kinds of agents, distinguishes the task of the poet from that of the historian.2 History speaks of "particulars," whereas poetry speaks more of "universals." A historian might assert, for example, that Alcibiades urged the Athenians to invade Sicily, or (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  17. added 2020-01-13
    Wittgenstein and Modernism.Michael Fischer - 1986 - Philosophy and Literature 42 (2):463-466.
    Even in a journal with the welcoming title Philosophy and Literature, contributors rightly feel obliged to explain why they are relating philosophical and literary texts to one another. Seeing literature as an engagingly vivid, "speaking picture" "figuring forth" the difficult abstractions of philosophy was once a default way of linking the two. But such a connection shortchanges the thinking at work in literature, reducing it to a popularizing tool, and overlooks the stories, examples, and metaphors that inform some powerful works (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  18. added 2020-01-05
    The "Analytic"/"Continental" Divide and the Question of Philosophy's Relation to Literature.Andreas Vrahimis - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (1):253-269.
    The history of the writing of philosophy could be seen as divided between two tendencies. One tendency involves a constant reconfiguration of the literary and stylistic elements involved in the way philosophy is written. Examples include most texts in the philosophical canon, from Plato's dialogues, or Aristotle's lecture notes, to Marcus Aurelius's diary, Augustine's confessions, the pseudepigrapha of the Areopagite, Anselm's prayer, Montaigne's essays, Descartes's meditations, Kierkegaard's play with pseudonymy, or Wittgenstein's "remarks."1 In such texts, we find a self-reflective attitude (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. added 2019-11-10
    Peirce as a Writer.Vincent M. Colapietro - 2019 - Philosophy and Literature 43 (2):384-410.
    C. S. Peirce’s writings are instructive in a number of ways, not least of all for how they, in part despite themselves, assist us in conceiving what he was so strongly disposed to disparage, literary discourse. He possessed greater linguistic facility and deeper literary sensibility than he appreciated, though a militantly polemical identity helped to insure he left this facility undeveloped and this sensibility unacknowledged.2 For this and other reasons, a study of Peirce as a writer is worthwhile. It is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. added 2019-11-10
    The Fear of Aesthetics in Art and Literary Theory.Sam Rose - 2017 - New Literary History 48 (2):223-244.
    Is aesthetics, as has recently been claimed, now able to meet the accusations often levelled against it? This essay examines counters to three of the most common: that aesthetics is based around overly narrow conceptions of "art" and "the aesthetic"; that aesthetics is politically disengaged; and that aesthetics fails to engage with actual art objects and their histories.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  21. added 2019-06-05
    From Text to Literature: New Analytic and Pragmatic Approaches.Stein Haugom Olsen & Anders Pettersson (eds.) - 2005 - Palgrave Macmillan.
    The articles in this collection focus attention on the concept of literature and on the relationship between this concept and the concepts of a literary work and a literary text. Adopting an analytic approach, the articles attempt to clarify how these concepts govern our thinking about the phenomenon of literature in various ways, exploring the issues which arise when these concepts are employed as theoretical instruments for describing and analyzing the phenomenon of literature.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. added 2019-06-05
    Origins of Modern Japanese Literature. [REVIEW]James O'Brien, Karatani Kōjin & Karatani Kojin - 1996 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 116 (2):371.
  23. added 2019-04-26
    The German Topos of Ukraine as a Lost Homeland: Ukrainian Topography in the Poem “Flight Into Kyiv” by Hans-Ulrich Treichel.Ievgeniia Voloshchuk - 2018 - Kyiv-Mohyla Humanities Journal 5:171-181.
    The article focuses on the cartographic enactment of the topos of Ukraine as a lost homeland in contemporary German literary discourse on migration, and in particular in the body of work that conveys the voices of the “second generation” — children of the German (post-)war migration. The article analyses by way of an illustrative example Hans-Ulrich Treichel’s poem “Flight into Kyiv,” in which we find reflected the autobiographical theme of the (re)construction of the lost homeland of his father, a Volyn (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. added 2018-12-11
    Antonin Artaud e la scrittura del reale. Glossolalie e disegni per un linguaggio analfabetico.Fabio Vergine - 2018 - Elephant and Castle. Laboratorio Dell'immaginario 1 (18).
    During the last ten years of his life, Antonin Artaud shows more and more intensively a multi-faceted and caustic refusal for traditional literature and the ordinary practice of writing. But above all, he shows a stylistic impatience for the alphabetic use of the word and the language. By the intention of creating an inhuman language, which could be understood also by the illiterate people, Artaud wants to undermine the significant use of the word, so that he can achieve a non-representative (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  25. added 2018-12-03
    What is Literature?Arthur Gibson - 2007 - Peter Lang, Oxford.
    This is the first book-length attempt to find the answer, by one author, since Sartre in his 1948 book with the same title.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  26. added 2018-08-04
    Adam Bede’s Dutch Realism and the Novelist’s Point of View.Rebecca Gould - 2012 - Philosophy and Literature 36 (2):404-423.
    Hegel was ambivalent about Dutch genre painting’s uncanny ability to find beauty in daily life. The philosopher regarded the Dutch painterly aesthetic as Romanticism avant la lettre, and classifies it as such in his Lectures on Aesthetics, under the section entitled “Die romantischen Künste [The Romantic arts].”1 Dutch art, in Hegel’s reading, is marred by many shortcomings. The most prominent among these are the “subjective stubbornness [subjective Beschlossenheit]” that prevents this art from attaining to the “free and ideal forms of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  27. added 2018-01-19
    Multilevel Poetry Translation as a Problem-Solving Task.Pedro Ata & Joao Queiroz - 2016 - Cognitive Semiotics 9 (2):139-147.
    Poems are treated by translators as hierarchical multilevel systems. Here we propose the notion of “multilevel poetry translation” to characterize such cases of poetry translation in terms of selection and rebuilding of a multilevel system of constraints across languages. Different levels of a poem correspond to different sets of components that asymmetrically constrain each other (e. g., grammar, lexicon, syntactic construction, prosody, rhythm, typography, etc.). This perspective allows a poem to be approached as a thinking-tool: an “experimental lab” which submits (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  28. added 2016-09-19
    HARRISON, BERNARD What Is Fiction For? Literary Humanism Restored. Indiana University Press, 2015, Xxvi + 593 Pp., $85.00 Cloth, $35.00 Paper. [REVIEW]David Egan - 2016 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 74 (2):212-215.
  29. added 2015-12-30
    Literary Style.Wolfgang Huemer - 2016 - In Noël Carroll & John Gibson (eds.), Routledge companion to philosophy of literature. Routledge.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  30. added 2015-09-15
    Sprache im literarischen Text.Wolfgang Huemer - 2014 - In Ingrid Vendrell Ferran & Christoph Demmerling (eds.), Wahrheit, Wissen Und Erkenntnis in der Literatur: Philosophische Beiträge. De Gruyter. pp. 57-70.
  31. added 2015-08-26
    Narrative Thickness.Rafe McGregor - 2015 - Estetika 52 (1):3-22.
    The purpose of this article is to demonstrate that the experience of a literary narrative qua literary narrative is an experience of narrative thickness, that is, an experience in which narrative form and narrative content are inseparable. I explain my thesis of poetic thickness in § 1, showing why it does not admit of extension from poetry to literary narratives. §§ 2–3 synthesize the work of Derek Attridge and Peter Lamarque, advancing narrative thickness as a necessary condition of literary narratives. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  32. added 2014-03-25
    Gadamer on Poetic and Everyday Language.Christopher Lawn - 2001 - Philosophy and Literature 25 (1):113-126.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  33. added 2014-03-08
    What is Literature? What is Art? Integrating Essence and History.Jerry Farber - 2005 - Journal of Aesthetic Education 39 (3):1-21.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  34. added 2014-03-07
    Broken Words: Maurice Blanchot and the Impossibility of Writing.Walter Brogan - 2009 - Comparative and Continental Philosophy 1 (2):181-192.
    This essay explains what Blanchot understands as writing and the space of literature. For Blanchot, writing is the place where the impossible interruption of the destiny of things is put into play, an interruption that world-formation needs but negates and conceals. Writing belongs to an excess outside of language, an otherness of language. The need to write is linked to the point at which nothing can be done with words. Writing is contrasted with dialectical language and the totalizing aim of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  35. added 2012-12-26
    Beşir Fuad and His Opponents: The Form of a Debate Over Literature and Truth in Nineteenth-Century Istanbul.Mehmet Karabela - 2011 - Journal of Turkish Literature 8 (1):96-106.
    One and a half months after Victor Hugo died in 1885, Beşir Fuad published a biography of him, in which Fuad defended Emile Zola’s naturalism and realism against Hugo’s romanticism. This resulted in the most important dispute in nineteenth-century Turkish literary history, the hakikiyyûn and hayâliyyûn debate, with the former represented by Beşir Fuad and the latter represented by Menemenlizâde Mehmet Tahir. This article focuses on the form of this debate rather than its content, and this focus reveals how the (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  36. added 2012-11-15
    Review of Chris Danta's Literature Suspends Death: Sacrifice and Storytelling in Kierkegaard, Kafka and Blanchot. [REVIEW]Martijn Boven - 2012 - Radical Philosophy 174 (july/august):51-53.
    In 'Literature Suspends Death: Sacrifice and Storytelling in Kierkegaard, Kafka and Blanchot' Chris Danta takes Genesis 22 as the starting point for an investigation of the role of literary imagination. His aim is to read the Genesis story from a literary-theoretical perspective in order to show how it can 'illuminate the secular situation of the literary writer.' To do this, Danta stages a fruitful confrontation between Søren Kierkegaard as defender of religion and inwardness and Franz Kafka and Maurice Blanchot as (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  37. added 2009-10-05
    Onomatopoetics: Theory of Language and Literature.Joseph F. Graham - 1992 - Cambridge University Press.
    The relationship of words to the things they represent and to the mind that forms them has long been the subject of linguistic enquiry. Joseph Graham's challenging book takes this debate into the field of literary theory, making a searching enquiry into the nature of literary representation. It reviews the arguments of Plato's Cratylus on how words signify things, and of Chomsky's theory of the innate "natural" status of language (contrasted with Saussure's notion of its essential arbitrariness). In the process, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  38. added 2009-10-05
    Literature as Aesthetic Object: The Kinesthetic Stratum.William Craig Forrest - 1969 - Journal of Aesthetics and Art Criticism 27 (4):455-459.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  39. added 2009-10-05
    The Semantics of Literature.Trevor Eaton - 1966 - Mouton.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  40. added 2009-09-28
    Towards a Phenomenological Theory of Literature.Kurt Mueller-Vollmer - 1963 - The Hague: Mouton.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  41. added 2009-09-04
    Literary Works and Institutional Practices.Robert J. Matthews - 1981 - British Journal of Aesthetics 21 (1):39-49.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  42. added 2009-08-20
    Aesthetics and Literature: A Problematic Relation?Peter Lamarque - 2007 - Philosophical Studies 135 (1):27 - 40.
    The paper argues that there is a proper place for literature within aesthetics but that care must be taken in identifying just what the relation is. In characterising aesthetic pleasure associated with literature it is all too easy to fall into reductive accounts, for example, of literature as merely “fine writing”. Belleslettrist or formalistic accounts of literature are rejected, as are two other kinds of reduction, to pure meaning properties and to a kind of narrative realism. The idea is developed (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  43. added 2009-07-27
    The Singularity of Literature.Derek Attridge - 2004 - Routledge.
    There is no shortage of testimony to literature's puzzling, unsettling, intoxicating, affecting, delighting powers. Nor has there been a shortage of attempts to define literature as a concept, a body of texts or a cultural practice. However, no definition has been able to pin down the peculiarity of literature or to chart our experience of the literary. In this volume, Derek Attridge ask us to confront with him the resistance to definition in order to explore afresh the singularity of literature. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  44. added 2009-07-27
    "What is Literature?" and Other Essays.Jean-Paul Sartre - 1988 - Harvard University Press.
    This new edition of "What is Literature?" also collects three other crucial essays of Sartre's for the first time in a volume of his.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   8 citations  
  45. added 2009-07-27
    What is Literature?Jean-Paul Sartre - 1967 - Methuen.
    Jean-Paul Sartre was one of the most important philosophical and political thinkers of the twentieth century. His writings had a potency that was irresistible to the intellectual scene that swept post-war Europe, and have left a vital inheritance to contemporary thought. The central tenet of the Existentialist movement which he helped to found, whereby God is replaced by an ethical self, proved hugely attractive to a generation that had seen the horrors of Nazism, and provoked a revolution in post-war thought (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   9 citations  
  46. added 2009-07-27
    What is Literature?Charles Du Bos - 1940 - Folcroft Library Editions.
    Literature and the soul.--Literature and light.--Literature and beauty.--Literature and the Word.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  47. added 2009-07-01
    Jagannātha's Definition of Poetry: An Analysis of the Introductory Verses of Rasagangādhara and the Definition of Poetry. [REVIEW]Norman Sjoman - 1981 - Journal of Indian Philosophy 9 (4):359-402.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  48. added 2009-07-01
    The Logic of Literature.Käte Hamburger - 1973 - Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   7 citations  
  49. added 2009-07-01
    The Semantic Definition of Literature.Colin A. Lyas - 1969 - Journal of Philosophy 66 (3):81-95.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation