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This category is about dehumanization as a social phenomenon of regarding or treating other humans as not or less human. Some people have been denied membership in the human species, which is a kind of dehumanization that is known since antiquity and that had some late reverberations in the 19th century. When people are regarded as less human rather than categorically as not human, dehumanization appears in its graded form, which is prevalent even in contemporary society. It can be explicit (blatant) or implicit. Often it utilizes the animal-human divide (animalistic dehumanization) or the machine-human divide (mechanistic dehumanization). Some researchers also connect dehumanization to objectification, de-individualization or depersonalization. Obviously, what dehumanization refers to depends on what ‘human’ means since it is the human (i.e. what it means to be human) that is attributed more or less in dehumanization. Further keywords that target specific forms or aspects of dehumanization are, for instance, animalization, commodification, sexism, racism and speciesism. 

Remark on other uses: Often the term ‘dehumanization’ shows up in philosophy not as what is studied, but simply in order to stress a negative evaluation of a phenomenon under study. For instance, physicalism, capitalist society or abortion have been taken as dehumanizing in that negative-qualifer sense. Works that use dehumanization only in that sense are not included in this category since it would broaden the category too much. There are also papers on art or natural sciences not as dehumanizing but as dehumanized: these papers refer to various forms of ‘leaving out the human’ in arts or sciences. Since these studies also do not refer (or at least not directly) to the social phenomenon of people regarding and treating other people as not or less human, they are also not included in this category.

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  1. Routledge Handbook of Dehumanization.Maria Kronfeldner (ed.) - forthcoming - London, New York: Routledge.
    A striking feature of atrocities, as seen in genocides, civil wars or violence against certain racial and ethnic groups, is the attempt to dehumanize – to deny and strip human beings of their humanity. Yet the very nature of dehumanization remains relatively poorly understood. The Routledge Handbook of Dehumanization is the first comprehensive and multidisciplinary reference source on the subject and an outstanding survey of the key concepts, issues and debates within dehumanization studies. Organized into four parts, the Handbook covers (...)
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  2. Mapping Dehumanization Studies (Preface and Introduction of Routledge Handbook of Dehumanization).Maria Kronfeldner - forthcoming - In Routledge Handbook of Dehumanization. London, Vereinigtes Königreich:
    Maria Kronfeldner’s Preface and Introduction to the Routledge Handbook of Dehumanization maps the landscape of dehumanization studies. She starts with a brief portrayal of the history of the field. The systematically minded sections that follow guide the reader through the resulting rugged landscape represented in the Handbook’s contributions. Different realizations, levels, forms, and ontological contrasts of dehumanization are distinguished, followed by remarks on the variety of targets of dehumanization. A discussion on valence and emotional aspects is added. Causes, functions, and (...)
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  3. On Hiding Faces.Maria Kronfeldner - forthcoming - APA Blog.
    This short piece explores the many reasons why we hide faces and how hiding faces relates to dehumanization, in particular if faces are hidden by others and thus prevented to speak.
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  4. Psychological Essentialism and Dehumanization.Maria Kronfeldner - forthcoming - In Routledge Handbook of Dehumanization. Routledge.
    In this Chapter, Maria Kronfeldner discusses whether psychological essentialism is a necessary part of dehumanization. This involves different elements of essentialism, and a narrow and a broad way of conceptualizing psychological essentialism, the first akin to natural kind thinking, the second based on entitativity. She first presents authors that have connected essentialism with dehumanization. She then introduces the error theory of psychological essentialism regarding the category of the human, and distinguishes different elements of psychological essentialism. On that basis, Kronfeldner connects (...)
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  5. Dehumanizing Strategies in Nazi Ideology and Their Anthropological Context.Johannes Steizinger - forthcoming - In Maria Kronfeldner (ed.), The Routledge Handbook of Dehumanization. London, New York: Routledge.
    This chapter explores the ideological dimension of dehumanization in the context of National Socialism, focusing on the connection between concepts of humanity and dehumanizing images. NS regarded itself as a political revolution, realizing a new concept of humanity. Nazi ideologues undergirded the self-understanding of NS by developing racist anthropologies. I examine two major strands of Nazi ideology, focusing on their diverging strategies of dehumanization, and arguing that they were dependent on different anthropological frameworks. Richard Walther Darré held a naturalistic concept (...)
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  6. Dehumanization, Disability, and Eugenics.Robert A. Wilson - forthcoming - In Maria E. Kronfeldner (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Dehumanization. New York, NY, USA:
    This paper explores the relationship between eugenics, disability, and dehumanization, with a focus on forms of eugenics beyond Nazi eugenics.
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  7. Thinking Through the Silence: Theorizing the Rape of Jewish Males During the Holocaust Through Survivor Testimonies.Tommy J. Curry - 2020 - Holocaust Studies 1 (1):1-27.
    Over the last several decades there has been an attempt to gender genocide by focusing on sexual as well as lethal violence during the Holocaust. While there has been tremendous consideration of women's experience of rape and sexual abuse during the Holocaust, the rape of men had not been previously engaged as a matter of study or archival investigation. This article is the first to study the rape of Jewish men and boys during the Holocaust through survivor testimonies and theorize (...)
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  8. Pornography and Dehumanization: The Essentialist Dimension.Eleonore Neufeld - 2020 - Australasian Journal of Philosophy 98 (4):703-717.
    The objective of this paper is to show that pornography dehumanizes women through essentialization. First, I argue that certain acts of subject-essentialization are acts of subject-dehumanization....
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  9. Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny, by Kate Manne. [REVIEW]Nora Berenstain - 2019 - Mind 128 (512):1360-1371.
    Kate Manne’s Down Girl: The Logic of Misogyny combines traditional conceptual analysis and feminist conceptual engineering with critical exploration of cases drawn from popular culture and current events in order to produce an ameliorative account of misogyny, i.e., one that will help address the problems of misogyny in the actual world. A feminist account of misogyny that is both intersectional and ameliorative must provide theoretical tools for recognizing misogyny in its many-dimensional forms, as it interacts and overlaps with other oppressions. (...)
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  10. Denying Humanity: The Distinct Neural Correlates of Blatant Dehumanization.Emile Bruneau, Nir Jacoby, Nour Kteily & Rebecca Saxe - 2018 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 147 (7):1078-1093.
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  11. Cuidado humanizado en pacientes con limitación del esfuerzo terapéutico en cuidados intensivos, desafíos para enfermería.Macarena Yañez Dabdoub & Ivonne Esmeralda Vargas Celis - 2018 - Persona y Bioética 22 (1):56-75.
    En las unidades de cuidados intensivos el equipo de salud utiliza todas las medidas posibles para preservar la vida de sus pacientes. No obstante, cuando las terapias son fútiles, se decide limitar el esfuerzo terapéutico. Este artículo tiene como objetivo describir los factores que pueden llevar a enfermería a deshumanizar sus cuidados en pacientes en LET en UCI. Revisión de la literatura en bases de datos, con las palabras clave: critical care, intensive care unit, limitation of therapeutic effort, end of (...)
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  12. The Wrong of Injustice, by Mari Mikkola.Katharine Jenkins - 2018 - Mind 127 (506):618-627.
    The Wrong of Injustice, by MikkolaMari. Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. 285.
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  13. Violence and the Evolving Face of Yao in Taiping Propaganda.Huan Jin - 2018 - Journal of Religion and Violence 6 (1):127-144.
    This paper explores the interplay between rhetorical and political violence during the Taiping Civil War. Specifically, I examine how yao 妖, a conception bearing many cultural and historical connotations, was profusely employed in Taiping propaganda and in individual testimonies reflecting traditional political and religious beliefs. In extant Taiping placards, the Taiping rebels used xiwen 檄文, the prose of “call to arms,” to persuade people to take up the Taiping cause and to solicit and justify violence. With the compilation and extensive (...)
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  14. What’s Left of Human Nature? A Post-Essentialist, Pluralist and Interactive Account of a Contested Concept.Maria Kronfeldner - 2018 - Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.
    Human nature has always been a foundational issue for philosophy. What does it mean to have a human nature? Is the concept the relic of a bygone age? What is the use of such a concept? What are the epistemic and ontological commitments people make when they use the concept? In What’s Left of Human Nature? Maria Kronfeldner offers a philosophical account of human nature that defends the concept against contemporary criticism. In particular, she takes on challenges related to social (...)
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  15. Resisting Dehumanization: Citizen Voices and Acts of Solidarity.Inger Lassen - 2018 - Critical Discourse Studies 15 (5):427-443.
    ABSTRACTRecent years have seen an increase in the influx of asylum-seekers in Scandinavia, and in Denmark this has led to ever-tighter immigration control. This article discusses emerging practices of refugee solidarity and resistance to migration policy in Danish civil society in the wake of what has been referred to as the European refugee crisis. To accomplish this purpose, I analyse how participants in Facebook discussions construe topoi and attitudes when facing the ethical dilemma of respecting the law versus showing concern (...)
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  16. Mother, Monster, Mrs, I: A Critical Evaluation of Gendered Naming Strategies in English Sentencing Remarks of Women Who Kill.Amanda Potts & Siobhan Weare - 2018 - International Journal for the Semiotics of Law - Revue Internationale de Sémiotique Juridique 31 (1):21-52.
    In this article, we take a novel approach to analysing English sentencing remarks in cases of women who kill. We apply computational, quantitative, and qualitative methods from corpus linguistics to analyse recurrent patterns in a collection of English Crown Court sentencing remarks from 2012 to 2015, where a female defendant was convicted of a homicide offence. We detail the ways in which women who kill are referred to by judges in the sentencing remarks, providing frequency information on pronominal, nominative, and (...)
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  17. The Color of Childhood: The Role of the Child/Human Binary in the Production of Anti-Black Racism.Toby Rollo - 2018 - Journal of Black Studies 49 (4):307-329.
    The binary between the figure of the child and the fully human being is invoked with regularity in analyses of race, yet its centrality to the conception of race has never been fully explored. For most commentators, the figure of the child operates as a metaphoric or rhetorical trope, a non-essential strategic tool in the perpetuation of White supremacy. As I show in the following, the child/human binary does not present a contingent or merely rhetorical construction but, rather, a central (...)
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  18. The Significance of Dehumanization: Nazi Ideology and its Psychological Consequences.Johannes Steizinger - 2018 - Politics, Religion and Ideology 19 (2):139‒157.
    Several authors have recently questioned whether dehumanization is a psychological prerequisite of mass violence. This paper argues that the significance of dehumanization in the context of National Socialism can be understood only if its ideological dimension is taken into account. The author concentrates on Alfred Rosenberg’s racist doctrine and shows that Nazi ideology can be read as a political anthropology that grounds both the belief in the German privilege and the dehumanization of the Jews. This anthropological framework combines biological, cultural (...)
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  19. ‘My Little Wild Fever-Struck Brother’: Human and Animal Subjectivity in Hélène Cixous’ Algeria.Helen Andersson - 2017 - International Journal of Philosophy and Theology 78 (4-5):456-468.
    This article examines the place of human and animal subjectivity in two autobiographically informed texts by Hélène Cixous. It takes her view on the word ‘human’ and the figure of Fips, the dog of the Cixous family, as a point of departure. By thinking through this figure, I argue, Cixous analyses the dehumanizing logic of colonialism and anti-Semitism in Algeria and develops her own response to such kinds of political evils, arguing for human relationality and animal corporeality. The article shows (...)
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  20. The Classroom as Privileged Space: Psychoanalytic Paradigms for Social Justice in Pedagogy.Tapo Chimbganda - 2017 - Lexington Books.
    This book examines the psychic and emotional effects of the dehumanization of children based on discrimination and difference in classrooms. Using psychoanalysis, it highlights the emotional structures that develop in learners through the repeated trauma of racism and homophobia. Recommended for scholars in education, psychoanalysis, and sociology.
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  21. The Wrong of Injustice: Dehumanization and its Role in Feminist Philosophy by Mari Mikkola.Kathryn Gillespie - 2017 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 27 (2):1-5.
    Mari Mikkola identifies three primary forms of social injustice—oppression, domination, and discrimination—and asks what makes them wrong. She argues that feminist philosophy has thus far focused heavily on gender as a lens or anchor through which to understand and respond to injustice. In Mikkola's view, this orientation around gender is limiting feminist philosophers' theoretical engagement with the roots of injustice. To remedy this problem, she builds a case for moving toward a more broadly humanist conception of injustice. The humanist feminism (...)
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  22. Amoral, Im/Moral and Dis/Loyal: Children’s Moral Status in Child Welfare.Zlatana Knezevic - 2017 - Childhood 4 (24):470-484.
    This article is a discursive examination of children’s status as knowledgeable moral agents within the Swedish child welfare system and in the widely used assessment framework BBIC. Departing from Fricker’s concept of epistemic injustice, three discursive positions of children’s moral status are identified: amoral, im/moral and dis/loyal. The findings show the undoubtedly moral child as largely missing and children’s agency as diminished, deviant or rendered ambiguous. Epistemic injustice applies particularly to disadvantaged children with difficult experiences who run the risk of (...)
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  23. Biohacking Gender: Cyborgs, Coloniality, and the Pharmacopornographic Era.Hilary Malatino - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):179-190.
    This essay explores how, for many minoritized peoples, cyborg ontology is experienced as dehumanizing rather than posthumanizing. Rereading Haraway’s Cyborg Manifesto through a decolonial, transfeminist lens, it explores the implications of Haraway’s assertion that cyborg subjectivity is the “illegitimate offspring of militarism and patriarchal capitalism” by examining the modern/colonial development and deployment of microprosthetic hormonal technologies – so often heralded as one of the technologies ushering in a queer, posthuman, post-gender future – as mechanisms of gendered and racialized subjective control (...)
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  24. Perceiving Mixed Valence Emotions Reduces Intergroup Dehumanisation.Francesca Prati & Roger Giner-Sorolla - 2017 - Cognition and Emotion 32 (5):1018-1031.
    ABSTRACTTo deny others’ humanity is one of the most heinous forms of intergroup prejudice. Given evidence that perceiving various forms of complexity in outgroup members reduces intergroup prejudice, we investigated across three experiments whether the novel dimension of emotional complexity, or outgroup members’ joint experience of mixed-valence emotions, would also reduce their dehumanisation. Experiment 1 found that perceiving fictitious aliens’ experience of the same primary emotions presented in mixed vs. non-mixed valence pairs led to reduced prejudice via attenuated dehumanisation, i.e. (...)
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  25. Humanizing and Dignifying Cultures: Dialogues with Religious Utopias.Robin S. Seelan - 2017 - Dialogue and Universalism 27 (3):27-37.
    Cultures can be divided into two kinds: exclusive and inclusive. Exclusive cultures are oppressed, vulnerable, and dehumanizing. Inclusive cultures are dignifying and humanizing, and they move towards the ideals of egalitarianism, prosperity, justice, etc. Religion, as part of culture, plays influential roles in the formation and promotion of ideals. This promotion can be located in religious utopias, because almost all religions hold utopias as central to their ideals and chart their ideologies towards these. In the context of exclusion and inclusion, (...)
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  26. Human Action as Text and the Quest for Justice: Contributions From Emmanuel Levinas and Paul Ricoeur Towards a Hermeneutic of Corporate Action.Avery Smith - 2017 - Dissertation,
    The purpose of this study is to develop a system of corporate ethics based on an understanding and interpretation of the ethical demand of human beings who are in relation with each other according to Emmanuel Levinas' teachings and the responsibility the human being has to and for herself and others whom she encounters based on Paul Ricoeur's teachings on human action, text and hermeneutics. While the philosophies to which we will be referring may not overtly present a normative ethic, (...)
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  27. Mikkola, Mari. The Wrong of Injustice: Dehumanization and Its Role in Feminist Philosophy. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016. Pp. 298. $99.00 ; $35.00. [REVIEW]Natalie Stoljar - 2017 - Ethics 128 (2):483-487.
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  28. Freud, Frankenstein and Our Fear of Robots: Projection in Our Cultural Perception of Technology.Michael Szollosy - 2017 - AI and Society 32 (3):433-439.
    This paper examines why robots are so often presented as monstrous in the popular media, regardless of the intended applications of the robots themselves. The figure of the robot monster is examined in its historical and cultural specificity—that is, as a direct descendent of monsters that we have grown accustomed to since the nineteenth century: Frankenstein, Mr. Hyde, vampires, zombies, etc. Using the psychoanalytic notion of projection, these monsters are understood as representing human anxieties regarding the dehumanising tendencies of science (...)
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  29. Transcending the Human/Non-Human Divide: The Geo-Politics and Body-Politics of Being and Perception, and Decolonial Art.Madina Tlostanova - 2017 - Angelaki 22 (2):25-37.
    This article focuses on the analysis of the geo-politics and body-politics of being, and perception as the key concepts in the decolonial option grounded in the spatiality and corporeality of our cognitive and perceptive mechanisms. Revived spatiality refers in this case not only to a physical space that we inhabit but also to our bodies as specific spatial entities – the privileged white male bodies or the damned, non-white, dehumanized and often gendered and sexualized bodies from the underside of modernity. (...)
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  30. The Moment of Microaggression: The Experience of Acts of Oppression, Dehumanization and Exploitation.Michael A. Dover - 2016 - Journal of Human Behavior in the Social Environment 27 (7-8):575-586.
    After a brief introduction and review of recent literature on microaggressions, a theoretical typology of three sources of social injustice (oppression, dehumanization, and exploitation) contributes to the theorization of the sources of microaggressions. A selected compendium of words and affective phrases generated in classroom exercises illustrates the nature of the experience of the moment of microaggression. Future research on microaggressions as well as evaluation of practice should examine the experience of microaggression, including being subjected to microaggression, initiating such acts, and (...)
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  31. Perceptual Dehumanization of Faces is Activated by Norm Violations and Facilitates Norm Enforcement.Katrina M. Fincher & Philip E. Tetlock - 2016 - Journal of Experimental Psychology: General 145 (2):131-146.
  32. Perceiving the Agency of Harmful Agents: A Test of Dehumanization Versus Moral Typecasting Accounts.Mansur Khamitov, Jeff D. Rotman & Jared Piazza - 2016 - Cognition 146:33-47.
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  33. The Politics of Human Nature.Maria Kronfeldner - 2016 - In Tibayrenc M. & Ayala F. J. (eds.), On human nature: Evolution, diversity, psychology, ethics, politics and religion. Academic Press. pp. 625-632.
    Human nature is a concept that transgresses the boundary between science and society and between fact and value. It is as much a political concept as it is a scientific one. This chapter will cover the politics of human nature by using evidence from history, anthropology and social psychology. The aim is to show that an important political function of the vernacular concept of human nature is social demarcation (inclusion/exclusion): it is involved in regulating who is ‘us’ and who is (...)
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  34. Humanism.Kate Manne - 2016 - Social Theory and Practice 42 (2):389-415.
    This paper considers the moral psychology of interpersonal conduct that is cruel, brutal, humiliating, or degrading. On the view I call “humanism,” such behavior often stems from the perpetrators’ dehumanizing view of their targets. The former may instead see the latter as subhuman creatures, nonhuman animals, supernatural beings, or even mindless objects. If people recognized their common humanity, they would have a hard time mistreating other human beings. This paper criticizes humanism so understood, arguing that its explanatory power is often (...)
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  35. The Wrong of Injustice: Dehumanization and its Role in Feminist Philosophy.Mari Mikkola - 2016 - Oxford University Press USA.
    This book examines contemporary structural social injustices from a feminist perspective. It asks: what makes oppression, discrimination, and domination wrongful? Is there a single wrongness-making feature of various social injustices that are due to social kind membership? Why is sexist oppression of women wrongful? What does the wrongfulness of patriarchal damage done to women consist in? In thinking about what normatively grounds social injustice, the book puts forward two related views. First, it argues for a paradigm shift in focus away (...)
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  36. Dehumanized Denizens, Displayed Animals: Prison Tourism and the Discourse of the Zoo.Kelly Struthers Montford - 2016 - philoSOPHIA: A Journal of Continental Feminism 6 (1):73-91.
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  37. Dehumanization: Its Operations and its Origins.Robert Mark Simpson - 2016 - Journal of Law and Biosciences 3 (1):178-184.
    Gail Murrow and Richard Murrow offer a novel account of dehumanization, by synthesizing data which suggest that where subject S has a dehumanized view of group G, S‘s neural mechanisms of empathy show a dampened response to the suffering of members of G, and S‘s judgments about the humanity of members of G are largely non-conscious. Here I examine Murrow and Murrow‘s suggestions about how identity-based hate speech bears responsibility for dehumanization in the first place. I identify a distinction between (...)
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  38. Paradoxes of Dehumanization.David Livingstone Smith - 2016 - Social Theory and Practice 42 (2):416-443.
    In previous writings, I proposed that we dehumanize others by attributing the essence of a less-than-human creature to them, in order to disable inhibitions against harming them. However, this account is inconsistent with the fact that dehumanizers implicitly, and often explicitly, acknowledge the human status of their victims. I propose that when we dehumanize others, we regard them as simultaneously human and subhuman. Drawing on the work of Ernst Jentsch, Mary Douglas, and Noël Carroll, I argue that the notion of (...)
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  39. Apeing the Human Essence: Simianization as Dehumanization.David Livingstone Smith & Ioana Panaitiu - 2016 - In Wulf Hund, Charles Mills & Sylvia Sebastiani (eds.), Simianization: Apes, Gender, Class, and Race. Lit Verlag. pp. 77-104.
    Representing members of racial minorities as apes or monkeys is a special case of dehumanization and cannot be properly understood outside of a general theory of dehumanization. We argue that to fully understand any particular case of dehumanization it is mandatory to consider the intersection of its psychological, cultural, and political determinants: the psychological component explains the distinctive form of dehumanizing thinking, the cultural component explains the significance of the choice of animal with which members of the dehumanized population are (...)
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  40. Understanding the Black Flame and Multigenerational Education Trauma: Toward a Theory of the Dehumanization of Black Students.June Cara Christian & Mary Rogers-Grantham - 2014 - Lexington Books.
    Using Africana critical theory as a critical framework to analyze W. E. B. Du Bois’s Black Flame trilogy, this study establishes a transdisciplinary theory of the dehumanization of Black students in the United States. As lenses of analysis, critical race theory and Post Traumatic Slave Syndrome reveal how the processes of racialization, colonization, and globalization contribute to the multigenerational traumas many Blacks have experienced in education since Reconstruction.
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  41. Dehumanization in Organizational Settings: Some Scientific and Ethical Considerations.Kalina Christoff - 2014 - Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 8.
  42. Social Constraints on the Direct Perception of Emotions and Intentions.Shaun Gallagher & Somogy Varga - 2014 - Topoi 33 (1):185-199.
    In this paper, we first review recent arguments about the direct perception of the intentions and emotions of others, emphasizing the role of embodied interaction. We then consider a possible objection to the direct perception hypothesis from social psychology, related to phenomena like ‘dehumanization’ and ‘implicit racial bias’, which manifest themselves on a basic bodily level. On the background of such data, one might object that social perception cannot be direct since it depends on and can in fact be interrupted (...)
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  43. Recovering the Human in Human Rights.Diana Tietjens Meyers - 2014 - Law, Culture, and Humanities:1-30.
    It is often said that human rights are the rights that people possess simply in virtue of being human – that is, in virtue of their intrinsic, dignity-defining common humanity. Yet, on closer inspection the human rights landscape doesn’t look so even. Once we bring perpetrators of human rights abuse and their victims into the picture, attributions of humanity to persons become unstable. In this essay, I trace the ways in which rights discourse ascribes variable humanity to certain categories of (...)
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  44. "Lllegal" Immigrants: Law, Fantasy, and Guts.Carlos Alberto Sánchez - 2014 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 21 (1):99-109.
    This paper exammes the construction and de-construction of the "illegal" immigrant in media spectacle and public discourse. I examme the manner in which hnmigrants are rendered "illegal" and then processed through a mechanism of dehumanization where they are simultaneously located in and outside the space of law. In this process, the "illegal" immigrant is stripped of rights, humanity, and intention. The "illegal" immigrant, seen merely as a body or text, becomes a thing—more precisely, a type of equipment, that as equipment, (...)
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  45. Judith Butler and an Ethics of Humanization.Hülya Şimga - 2014 - Dialogue and Universalism 24 (3):166-173.
    This paper argues that the question of the human is a major concern in Judith Butler’s philosophy. I believe that although this concern is more visible in her relatively recent works on ethics and politics, in her earlier works it is always in the background. I read Butler as a deep thinker on the nature of the human, and argue that her thoughts on ethics and politics should be read as a yearning for a human condition where a collectively inhabitable (...)
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  46. Dehumanization, Essentialism, and Moral Psychology.David Livingstone Smith - 2014 - Philosophy Compass 9 (11):814-824.
    Despite its importance, the phenomenon of dehumanization has been neglected by philosophers. Since its introduction, the term “dehumanization” has come to be used in a variety of ways. In this paper, I use it to denote the psychological stance of conceiving of other human beings as subhuman creatures. I draw on an historical example – Morgan Godwyn's description of 17th century English colonists' dehumanization of African slaves and use this to identify three explanatory desiderata that any satisfactory theory of dehumanization (...)
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  47. How Liberal is (the Liberal Critique of) a Liberal Eugenics?Nathan Van Camp - 2014 - Humana Mente 7 (26).
    This article critically surveys the current bioethical and politico-philosophical debate about the ethical permissibility of a so-called ‘liberal eugenics’ and argues that neither the liberal argument for nor the liberal argument against human genetic enhancement is internally consistent as, ultimately, each ends up violating the very liberal principles it nonetheless pretends to defend. In particular, it will be shown that while the argument against a new eugenics necessarily entails a preemptive dehumanization of any potential enhanced form of life, the argument (...)
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  48. Tras los monstruos de la biopolítica.Isabel Balza - 2013 - Dilemata 12:27-46.
    In this paper I examine the figure of the monster, in both its negative and positive aspects, such as the notion of biopolitics. As a negative figure, the monster would represent the dehumanized subject produced by exclusion mechanisms operating in destructive version of biopolitics, resulting in thanatopolitics, and in this sense provokes horror and abjection. Here I will use the analyses of the anthropological machine (Agamben), the device of the person (Esposito) and indefinite detention (Butler). As a positive figure, the (...)
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  49. Seeing Human: Distinct and Overlapping Neural Signatures Associated with Two Forms of Dehumanization.Anthony I. Jack, Abigail J. Dawson & Megan E. Norr - 2013 - NeuroImage 79:313-328.
    The process of dehumanization, or thinking of others as less than human, is a phenomenon with significant societal implications. According to Haslam's model, two concepts of humanness derive from comparing humans with either animals or machines: individuals may be dehumanized by likening them to either animals or machines, or humanized by emphasizing differences from animals or machines. Recent work in cognitive neuroscience emphasizes understanding cognitive processes in terms of interactions between distributed cortical networks. It has been found that reasoning about (...)
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  50. Intellectual Disability: Ethics, Dehumanization, and a New Moral Community.Heather E. Keith - 2013 - J. Wiley.
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