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  1. added 2020-05-19
    Mapping the Psychotic Mind: A Review on the Subjective Structure of Thought Insertion.Pablo Lopez-Silva - 2018 - The Psychiatry Quarterly 89 (4).
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  2. added 2020-05-19
    The Typology Problem and the Doxastic Approach to Delusions.Pablo Lopez-Silva - 2017 - Filosofia Unisinos 17 (2).
  3. added 2020-05-19
    DSM-V and the Diagnostic Role of Psychotic.Pablo Lopez-Silva - 2017 - Archives of Clinical Psychiatry 44 (6).
  4. added 2020-04-18
    Delusion, Reality, and Intersubjectivity: A Phenomenological and Enactive Analysis.Thomas Fuchs - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (1):61-79.
    Normal convictions are formed in a context of social living and common knowledge. Immediate experience of reality survives only if it can fit into the frame of what is socially valid or can be critically tested. … Each single experience can always be corrected but the total context of experience is something stable and can hardly be corrected at all. The source for incorrigibility therefore is not to be found in any single phenomenon by itself but in the human situation (...)
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  5. added 2020-04-18
    Description Is Not Enough: The Real Challenge of Enactivism for Psychiatry.Henrik Walter - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (1):85-87.
    In his article, "Delusion, Reality, and Inter-subjectivity," Thomas Fuchs gives an "enactivist" account of how primary delusions in early schizophrenia evolve. First, subjects experience the "loss of familiar, commonsensical meanings"—known as delusional mood. Consecutively they experience new "revelatory significances," in perception as well as in social interaction, with all experiences becoming radically "subjectivized." Out of these "uncanny, spurious and made" experiences delusions develop. Suddenly the formerly uncanny experiences make sense. This new subjective reality, however, is "rigid." Subjects are no longer (...)
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  6. added 2020-04-09
    Delusion, Reality, and Excentricity: Comment on Thomas Fuchs.Louis A. Sass - 2020 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 27 (1):81-83.
    In "Delusion, Reality, and Intersubjectivity," Thomas Fuchs offers a superb presentation of an enactive/phenomenological approach to schizophrenic delusions—an approach that is clearly superior to the poor-reality-testing formula that has dominated thinking about delusion in psychiatry, psychoanalysis, and cognitive-behavioral theory. As he convincingly argues, two key tendencies go a long way toward accounting for the distinctive features of delusion in schizophrenia: 1) withdrawal from practical, sensori-motoric interaction with the physical environment; and 2) failure to experience reality in intersubjective terms—as a realm (...)
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  7. added 2020-03-28
    Cotard Syndrome, Self-Awareness, and I-Concepts.Rocco J. Gennaro - 2020 - Philosophy and the Mind Sciences 1 (1).
    Various psychopathologies of self-awareness, such as somatoparaphrenia and thought insertion in schizophrenia, might seem to threaten the viability of the higher-order thought (HOT) theory of consciousness since it requires a HOT about one’s own mental state to accompany every conscious state. The HOT theory of consciousness says that what makes a mental state a conscious mental state is that there is a HOT to the effect that “I am in mental state M.” I have argued in previous work that a (...)
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  8. added 2020-02-11
    Social Reforms: As Related to Realities and Delusions; an Examination of the Increase and Distribution of Wealth, From 1801 to 1910. W. H. Mallock.Hugh Dalton - 1914 - International Journal of Ethics 25 (1):119-121.
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  9. added 2020-01-21
    Delusion, Proper Function, and Justification.Parker Crutchfield - forthcoming - Neuroethics:1-12.
    Among psychiatric conditions, delusions have received significant attention in the philosophical literature. This is partly due to the fact that many delusions are bizarre, and their contents interesting in and of themselves. But the disproportionate attention is also due to the notion that by studying what happens when perception, cognition, and belief go wrong, we can better understand what happens when these go right. In this paper, I attend to delusions for the second reason—by evaluating the epistemology of delusions, we (...)
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  10. added 2019-12-11
    Transparent Delusion.Vladimir Krstić - 2020 - Review of Philosophy and Psychology 11 (1):183-201.
    In this paper, I examine a kind of delusion in which the patients judge that their occurrent thoughts are false and try to abandon them precisely because they are false, but fail to do so. I call this delusion transparent, since it is transparent to the sufferer that their thought is false. In explaining this phenomenon, I defend a particular two-factor theory of delusion that takes the proper integration of relevant reasoning processes as vital for thought-evaluation. On this proposal, which (...)
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  11. added 2019-12-04
    Inference and Consciousness.Anders Nes & Timothy Chan (eds.) - 2020 - London: Routledge.
    Inference has long been a concern in epistemology, as an essential means by which we extend our knowledge and test our beliefs. Inference is also a key notion in influential psychological or philosophical accounts of mental capacities, from perception via utterance comprehension to problem-solving. Consciousness, on the other hand, has arguably been the defining interest of philosophy of mind over recent decades. Comparatively little attention, however, has been devoted to the significance of consciousness for the proper understanding of the nature (...)
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  12. added 2019-11-17
    Possibilities of Misidentification.Lauren Ashwell - 2018 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 25 (3):161-164.
    We seem to have a special, seemingly direct, relationship to our own thoughts that we do not have to the thoughts of others; I can become aware of my thoughts in a way that I cannot become aware of yours: through introspection. Those who have delusions of thought-insertion, however, claim not only to be aware of another's thoughts, but to have another's thoughts in their own mind. These thoughts, of course, cannot actually be someone else's thoughts. However, if we take (...)
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  13. added 2019-11-17
    Reality, Realness, and the Natural Attitude.Matthew Broome - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (2):115-118.
  14. added 2019-11-17
    Intimations of Immortality.Peter Fifield & Matthew Broome - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (2):141-144.
    Young’s paper (2012) offers an interesting and fruitful extension to recent work on Cotard’s syndrome, and in particular, a philosophical investigation of how and why beliefs around death and non-existence frequently co-occur with beliefs around immortality. In this brief response, we discuss a few issues from the paper. Namely, the issue of Cotard delusion being a natural kind, the seeming paradox of death and immortality and its relation to wider culture and literature, and the utility of the concept of misplaced (...)
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  15. added 2019-11-15
    Alien Control: From Phenomenology to Cognitive Neurobiology.Sean A. Spence - 2001 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 8 (2-3):163-172.
    People experiencing alien control report that their thoughts, movements, actions, and emotions have been replaced by those of an "other." The latter is commonly a perceived persecutor of the patient. Here I describe the clinical phenomenology of alien control, mechanistic models that have been used to explain it, problems inherent in these models, the brain deficits and functional abnormalities associated with this symptom, and the means by which disordered agency may be examined in this perplexing condition. Our current state of (...)
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  16. added 2019-11-13
    Philosophy of Psychiatry.Dominic Murphy - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  17. added 2019-11-13
    Dominic Murphy Psychiatry in the Scientific Image.Robin Brown - 2009 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (3):673-678.
  18. added 2019-11-13
    Underconstraint and Overconstraint in Psychiatry.Elena Bezzubova & Gordon Globus - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):788-789.
    Hallucination lies at an intriguing border between psychiatry and philosophy. Although Behrendt & Young (B&Y) tie their proposal to Kantian transcendental idealism, other philosophical positions are equally consistent. Cognition is underconstrained by reality not only in hallucination but also in autism and dreaming. Sensory underconstraint is insufficient to encompass schizophrenia. There is also a breakdown in integrative capacity on the cognitive side. From a wider clinical perspective than schizophrenia, there can be underconstraint or overconstraint in sensory and cognitive functionalities.
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  19. added 2019-11-13
    Underconstrained Perception or Underconstrained Theory?André Aleman, Edward H. F. de Haan & René S. Kahn - 2004 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 27 (6):787-788.
    Although the evidence remains tentative at best, the conception of hallucinations in schizophrenia as being underconstrained perception resulting from intrinsic thalamocortical resonance in sensory areas might complement current models of hallucination. However, in itself, the approach falls short of comprehensively explaining the neurogenesis of hallucinations in schizophrenia, as it neglects the role of external attributional biases, mental imagery, and a disconnection between frontal and temporal areas.
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  20. added 2019-11-13
    Top-Down Modulation, Emotion, and Hallucination.André Aleman & René S. Kahn - 2002 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 25 (5):578-578.
    We argue that the pivotal role assigned by Northoff to the principle of top-down modulation in catatonia might successfully be applied to other symptoms of schizophrenia, for example, hallucinations. Second, we propose that Northoff's account would benefit from a more comprehensive analysis of the cognitive level of explanation. Finally, contrary to Northoff, we hypothesize that “top-down modulation” might play as important a role as “horizontal modulation” in affective-behavioral alterations.
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  21. added 2019-11-11
    Teresian Visions.Rogelio Luque & José M. Villagrán - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (3):273-276.
    Immédiates, efficaces et inépuisables comme des sensations, mais indépendantes du dehors et maîtresses de l’espace comme des images, les visions «imaginatives» de Thérèse, pour voisines qu’elles soient de nos visions sensorielles, méritent pourtant une place à part et ne sont ni des hallucinations vulgaires, indiscernables des sensations, ni des hallucinations psychiques. Ce sont les hallucinations thérésiennes. (Pierre Quercy 1930).
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  22. added 2019-11-08
    One Stage Is Not Enough.Andrew W. Young & Karel W. de Pauw - 2002 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (1):55-59.
  23. added 2019-11-08
    Psychosis Good and Bad: Values-Based Practice and the Distinction Between Pathological and Nonpathological Forms of Psychotic Experience.Mike Jackson & K. W. M. Fulford - 2002 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (4):387-394.
  24. added 2019-11-06
    Commentary on Connectionist Hysteria.James Phillips & J. Melvin Woody - 1994 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 1 (2):89-90.
  25. added 2019-11-06
    Classifying Madness: A Philosophical Examination of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.Rachel Cooper - unknown
    Classifying Madness (Springer, 2005) concerns philosophical problems with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, more commonly known as the D.S.M. The D.S.M. is published by the American Psychiatric Association and aims to list and describe all mental disorders. The first half of Classifying Madness asks whether the project of constructing a classification of mental disorders that reflects natural distinctions makes sense. Chapters examine the nature of mental illness, and also consider whether mental disorders fall into natural kinds. The (...)
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  26. added 2019-11-05
    Therapeutic Effects of Hallucinogens.Michael Winkelman - 1991 - Anthropology of Consciousness 2 (3-4):15-19.
  27. added 2019-11-04
    Nothing but Neurons? Examining the Ontological Dimension of Schizophrenia in the Case of Auditory Hallucinations.Mike Luedmann - 2010 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 31 (1-2):49-63.
    Using the example of auditory hallucinations which especially occur in the psychopathology of schizophrenia this text tries to bridge the gap between empirical research in psychology or psychiatry and philosophical reflection on the mind–body problem. It is a fact that the neuronal manifestations of schizophrenia are significantly associated with psychic characteristics of this disorder. But nevertheless, it is questionable how these dimensions of schizophrenia are related to each other, exactly. The suggested intuitive plausible dualistic solutions of the mind–body problem are (...)
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  28. added 2019-10-17
    In Defense of Estrangement.Garry Young - 2007 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 14 (1):51-56.
  29. added 2019-10-16
    From the Transcendental to the Enactive.Shaun Gallagher - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (2):119-121.
  30. added 2019-10-16
    Depression: Insight, Illusion, and Psychopharmacological Calvinism.S. Nassir Ghaemi - 1999 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 6 (4):287-294.
  31. added 2019-10-03
    No One is Psychotic in My Presence.S. Nassir Ghaemi - 2008 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 15 (4):315-319.
  32. added 2019-10-03
    The Phenomenology of Abnormal Belief: A Philosophical and Psychiatric Inquiry.Edgar Jones - 1999 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 6 (1):1-16.
  33. added 2019-10-01
    Response to Commentaries.Edgar Jones - 1999 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 6 (1):27-28.
  34. added 2019-09-23
    Principles of Psychopathology Two Worlds, Two Minds, Two Hemispheres.J. Cutting - 1997 - Oxford University Press UK.
    Psychopathology is the study of the signs and symptoms of psychiatric disorders - delusions, hallucinations, phobias, depression, for example. This book gives an account of the terms currently in use and attempts an in-depth analysis of the nature of each. The matter is examined both from a philosophical perspective and from the point of view of what is known about the function of the hemispheres of the brain.
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  35. added 2019-09-20
    Clinical Anecdotes: A Logic in Madness.Aaron J. Hauptman - 2015 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 22 (4):303-305.
    The ultimate language of madness is that of reason.In short, under the chaotic and manifest delirium reigns the order of a secret delirium. In this second delirium, which is, in a sense, pure reason, reason delivered of all the external tinsel of dementia, is located the paradoxical truth of madness. And this in a double sense, since we find here both what makes madness true and what makes it truly madness.At the urging of his parents, Mr. A, a college-age young (...)
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  36. added 2019-09-16
    Folk and Philosophical Epistemologies: A Double Bookkeeping of Sorts by Delusion’s Theoreticians?Clarissa de Rosalmeida Dantas - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (2):121-123.
    Delusions are typically regarded as beliefs of a certain kind, both by psychiatrists and by lay people. In “Double Bookkeeping and Doxasticism about Delusion,” Porcher formulates and assesses two kinds of arguments against doxasticism about delusions, the theoretical stance according to which delusions are a kind of belief. Those arguments, which Porcher calls “the argument from action guidance and the argument from phenomenology” are motivated by a phenomenon sometimes associated with delusions: double bookkeeping, a kind of ambivalence of patients, who (...)
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  37. added 2019-09-13
    Somatoparaphrenia, Anosognosia, and Higher-Order Thoughts.Rocco J. Gennaro - 2015 - In Disturbed Consciousness: New Essays on Psychopathology and Theories of Consciousness. Cambridge, MA: MIT Press. pp. 55-74.
    Somatoparaphrenia is a pathology of self characterized by the sense of alienaton from parts of one’s body. It is usually construed as a kind of delusional disorder caused by extensive right hemisphere lesions. Lesions in the temporoparietal junction are common in somatoparaphrenia but deep cortical regions (for example, the posterior insula) and subcortical regions (for example, the basal ganglia) are also sometimes implicated (Valler and Ronschi 2009). Patients are often described as feeling that a limb belongs to another person and (...)
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  38. added 2019-09-11
    Self-Deception in and Out of Illness: Are Some Subjects Responsible for Their Delusions?Quinn Hiroshi Gibson - 2017 - Palgrave Communications 15 (3):1-12.
    This paper raises a slightly uncomfortable question: are some delusional subjects responsible for their delusions? This question is uncomfortable because we typically think that the answer is pretty clearly just ‘no’. However, we also accept that self-deception is paradigmatically intentional behavior for which the self-deceiver is prima facie blameworthy. Thus, if there is overlap between self-deception and delusion, this will put pressure on our initial answer. This paper argues that there is indeed such overlap by offering a novel philosophical account (...)
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  39. added 2019-08-17
    Nonrational Belief Paradoxes as Byzantine Failures.Ryan Miller - manuscript
    David Christensen and others argue that Dutch Strategies are more like peer disagreements than Dutch Books, and should not count against agents’ conformity to ideal rationality. I review these arguments, then show that Dutch Books, Dutch Strategies, and peer disagreements are only possible in the case of what computer scientists call Byzantine Failures—uncorrected Byzantine Faults which update arbitrary values. Yet such Byzantine Failures make agents equally vulnerable to all three kinds of epistemic inconsistencies, so there is no principled basis for (...)
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  40. added 2019-08-14
    Continuing Commentary : Challenges or Misunderstandings? A Defence of the Two-Factor Theory Against the Challenges to its Logic.Chenwei Nie - 2019 - Cognitive Neuropsychiatry 24 (4):300-307.
    Corlett, P. R. (2019. Factor one, familiarity and frontal cortex: A challenge to the two-factor theory of delusions. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, 24(3), 165–177. doi:10.1080/13546805.2019.1606706 ) raises two groups of challenges against the two-factor theory of delusions: One focuses on weighing “the evidence for … the two-factor theory”; the other aims to question “the logic of the two-factor theory” (ibid., p. 166). McKay, R. (2019. Measles, magic and misidentifications: A defence of the two-factor theory of delusions. Cognitive Neuropsychiatry, 24(3), 183–190. doi:10.1080/13546 805.2019.1607273) (...)
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  41. added 2019-08-14
    Delusional Beliefs, Two-Factor Theories, and Bizarreness.Chenwei Nie - 2016 - Frontiers of Philosophy in China 11 (2):263-278.
    In order to explain delusional beliefs, one must first consider what factors should be included in a theory of delusion. Unlike a one-factor theory, a two-factor theory of delusion argues that not only anomalous experience (the first factor) but also an impairment of the belief-evaluation system (the second factor) is required. Recently, two-factor theorists have adopted various Bayesian approaches in order to give a more accurate description of delusion formation. By reviewing the progression from a one-factor theory to a two-factor (...)
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  42. added 2019-06-20
    The Feeling of Embodiment: A Case Study in Explaining Consciousness.Glenn Carruthers - 2019 - Palgrave MacMillian.
    This book proposes a novel and rigorous explanation of consciousness. It argues that the study of an aspect of our self-consciousness known as the ‘feeling of embodiment’ teaches us that there are two distinct phenomena to be targeted by an explanation of consciousness. First is an explanation of the phenomenal qualities – 'what it is like' – of the experience; and second is the subject's awareness of those qualities. Glenn Carruthers explores the phenomenal qualities of the feeling of embodiment using (...)
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  43. added 2019-06-18
    Double Bookkeeping and Doxasticism About Delusion.José Eduardo Porcher - 2019 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 26 (2):111-119.
    Clinical delusions are commonly thought of and characterized as beliefs, both by psychiatrists and by the general population. That fact is encoded in the definition of delusion in the Glossary of Technical Terms of the most recent edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders :A false belief based on incorrect inference about external reality that is firmly held despite what almost everyone else believes and despite what constitutes incontrovertible and obvious proof or evidence to the contrary.Although almost (...)
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  44. added 2019-06-14
    Philip Gerrans the Measure of Madness: Philosophy of Mind, Cognitive Neuroscience, and Delusional Thought.Lisa Bortolotti & Rachel Gunn - 2016 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 67 (3):919-923.
  45. added 2019-06-06
    Folie À Deux and its Lessons for Two‐Factor Theorists.Robyn Langdon - 2013 - Mind and Language 28 (1):72-82.
    In folie à deux, a ‘primary’ patient transmits a delusional belief to one or more ‘secondary’ patients who then adopt and share the belief. This paper applies the two‐factor theory of delusion to retrospectively analyse published cases of folie à deux. Lessons from this retrospective analysis include, firstly, that two‐factor theorists need to shift their focus from endogenous processes to consider the exogenous source of delusional content in most secondaries. Secondly, secondaries who come to share the belief via normal processes (...)
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  46. added 2019-06-06
    Explaining Schizophrenia: Auditory Verbal Hallucination and Self‐Monitoring.Wayne Wu - 2012 - Mind and Language 27 (1):86-107.
    Do self‐monitoring accounts, a dominant account of the positive symptoms of schizophrenia, explain auditory verbal hallucination? In this essay, I argue that the account fails to answer crucial questions any explanation of auditory verbal hallucination must address. Where the account provides a plausible answer, I make the case for an alternative explanation: auditory verbal hallucination is not the result of a failed control mechanism, namely failed self‐monitoring, but, rather, of the persistent automaticity of auditory experience of a voice. My argument (...)
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  47. added 2019-06-06
    Who Designed the Designer?: A Dialogue on Richard Dawkins's the God Delusion: Groothuis Who Designed the Designer?Douglas Groothuis - 2009 - Think 8 (21):71-81.
    In The God Delusion, Richard Dawkins argues that any designer capable of creating the universe and the things we find in it would have to be at least as complex as his creation. If complexity requires a designer, then the designer will require a designer, and so on to infinity. Rather than actually providing an explanation for complexity we see around us, those who invoke a cosmic designer merely postpone the problem. Here, Douglas Groothuis challenges Dawkins's argument.
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  48. added 2019-06-06
    The Dangers of Democratic Delusions.Kishore Mahbubani - 2009 - Ethics and International Affairs 23 (1):19-25.
    A "League of Democracies," according to Mahbubani, will divide the world at the very time that a new global consensus needs to be created to address pressing global challenges.
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  49. added 2019-06-06
    The God Delusion. By Richard Dawkins: Book Reviews. [REVIEW]Peter Milward - 2008 - Heythrop Journal 49 (4):696-700.
  50. added 2019-06-06
    Comments on Ingra Shellenberg’s “How Paranoid Delusions Support ‘Simulation Theory’”.Nicoletta Orlandi - 2008 - Southwest Philosophy Review 24 (2):33-36.
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