This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories
Subcategories:History/traditions: Democracy
3005 found
Search inside:
(import / add options)   Order:
1 — 50 / 3005
Material to categorize
  1. Fabrizia Abbate (2005). L'occhio Della Compassione: Immaginazione Narrativa E Democrazia Globalizzata in Martha Nussbaum. Studium.
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
     
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  2. Miguel Abensour (2002). Savage Democracy and Principle of Anarchy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 28 (6):703-726.
    This essay offers only a broad description of a possible comparison between 'savage democracy' in the terms of Claude Lefort and the 'principle of anarchy' according to Reiner Schurmann. First, I shall try to define savage democracy. Then, in a second move, after having clarified Schurmann's principle of anarchy, I shall outline the terms for a possible confrontation of their respective views. The point here is to show the extent to which the contextualization of democracy with anarchy, considered as principle, (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  3. George L. Abernethy (1942). Book Review:Left-Wing Democracy in the English Civil War: A Study of the Social Philosophy of Gerrard Winstanley. David W. Petergorsky. [REVIEW] Ethics 52 (3):378-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  4. A. Abizadeh (2010). Democratic Legitimacy and State Coercion: A Reply to David Miller. Political Theory 38 (1):121-130.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   2 citations  
  5. A. Abizadeh (2008). Democratic Theory and Border Coercion: No Right to Unilaterally Control Your Own Borders. Political Theory 36 (1):37-65.
    The question of whether or not a closed border entry policy under the unilateral control of a democratic state is legitimate cannot be settled until we first know to whom the justification of a regime of control is owed. According to the state sovereignty view, the control of entry policy, including of movement, immigration, and naturalization, ought to be under the unilateral discretion of the state itself: justification for entry policy is owed solely to members. This position, however, is inconsistent (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   5 citations  
  6. Arash Abizadeh, Border Coercion and Democratic Legitimacy: Freedom of Association, Territorial Dominion, and Self-Defence.
  7. Arash Abizadeh (2012). On the Demos and its Kin: Nationalism, Democracy, and the Boundary Problem. American Political Science Review 106 (4):867-882.
    Cultural-nationalist and democratic theory both seek to legitimize political power via collective self-rule: their principle of legitimacy refers right back to the very persons over whom political power is exercised. But such self-referential theories are incapable of jointly solving the distinct problems of legitimacy and boundaries, which they necessarily combine, once it is assumed that the self-ruling collectivity must be a pre-political, in-principle bounded, ground of legitimacy. Cultural nationalism claims that political power is legitimate insofar as it expresses the nation’s (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  8. Arash Abizadeh (2010). Closed Borders, Human Rights, and Democratic Legitimation. In David Hollenbach (ed.), Driven From Home: Human Rights and the New Realities of Forced Migration. Georgetown University Press
    Critics of state sovereignty have typically challenged the state’s right to close its borders to foreigners by appeal to the liberal egalitarian discourse of human rights. According to the liberty argument, freedom of movement is a basic human right; according to the equality or justice argument, open borders are necessary to reduce global poverty and inequality, both matters of global justice. I argue that human rights considerations do indeed mandate borders considerably more open than is the norm today but that, (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  9. Arash Abizadeh (2004). Historical Truth, National Myths and Liberal Democracy: On the Coherence of Liberal Nationalism. Journal of Political Philosophy 12 (3):291–313.
    The claim that liberal democratic normative commitments are compatible with nationalism is challenged by the widely acknowledged fact that national identities invariably depend on historical myths: the nationalist defence of such publicly shared myths is in tension with liberal democratic theory’s commitment to norms of publicity, public justification, and freedom of expression. Recent liberal nationalist efforts to meet this challenge by justifying national myths on liberal democratic grounds fail to distinguish adequately between different senses of myth. Once this is done (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  10. Arash Abizadeh (2002). Does Liberal Democracy Presuppose a Cultural Nation? Four Arguments. American Political Science Review 96 (3):495-509.
    This paper subjects to critical analysis four common arguments in the sociopolitical theory literature supporting the cultural nationalist thesis that liberal democracy is viable only against the background of a single national public culture: the arguments that (1) social integration in a liberal democracy requires shared norms and beliefs (Schnapper); (2) the levels of trust that democratic politics requires can be attained only among conationals (Miller); (3) democratic deliberation requires communicational transparency, possible in turn only within a shared national public (...)
    Remove from this list  
    Translate
      Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   11 citations  
  11. Carlo Invernizzi Accetti (forthcoming). Between Reason and Will: On Christopher Meckstroth’s The Struggle for Democracy. European Journal of Political Theory:1474885116652827.
    Christopher Meckstroth’s book The Struggle for Democracy poses and attempts to solve a central problem of democratic theory: what he calls the ‘paradox of authorization’, whereby the very activity of spelling out the political content of democracy is said to potentially contradict its object, since the democratic theorist may end up substituting himself or herself for ‘the people’ in deciding what this form government amounts to in practice. In order to avoid this problem, Meckstroth suggests that the political content of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  12. Carlo Invernizzi Accetti (2010). Can Democracy Emancipate Itself From Political Theology? Habermas and Lefort on the Permanence of the Theologico-Political. Constellations 17 (2):254-270.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  13. Carlo Invernizzi Accetti, Alessandro Mulieri, Hubertus Buchstein, Dario Castiglione, Lisa Disch, Jason Frank, Yves Sintomer & Nadia Urbinati (forthcoming). Debating Representative Democracy. Contemporary Political Theory 15 (2):205-242.
  14. B. A. Ackerly (2005). Is Liberalism the Only Way Toward Democracy?: Confucianism and Democracy. Political Theory 33 (4):547-576.
  15. Brooke A. Ackerly (2006). Deliberative Democratic Theory for Building Global Civil Society: Designing a Virtual Community of Activists. Contemporary Political Theory 5 (2):113-141.
    The questions of this article are: what can we learn from deliberative democratic theory, its critics, the practices of local deliberative communities, the needs of potential participants, and the experiences of virtual communities that would be useful in designing a technology-facilitated institution for global civil society that is deliberative and democratic in its values? And what is the appropriate design of such an online institution so that it will be attentive to the undemocratic forces enabled by power inequalities that can (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  16. Brooke A. Ackerly (2005). Is Liberalism the Only Way Toward Democracy? Confucianism and Democracy. Political Theory 33 (4):547 - 576.
    This article identifies a foundation for Confucian democratic political thought in Confucian thought. Each of the three aspects emphasized is controversial, but supported by views held within the historical debates and development of Confucian political thought and practice. This democratic interpretation of Confucian political thought leads to (1) an expectation that all people are capable of ren and therefore potentially virtuous contributors to political life; (2) an expectation that the institutions of political, social, and economic life function so as to (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   4 citations  
  17. H. B. Acton (1945). The Device of Government. An Essay in Civil Polity. By John Laird, LL.D., F.B.A. (Cambridge University Press. 1944. Pp. 173. Price, 6s. Net.). [REVIEW] Philosophy 20 (75):89-.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  18. H. Adam (1990). Transition to Democracy: South Africa And Eastern Europe. Télos 1990 (85):33-55.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  19. Harry Adams (2008). Against Plutocracies: Fighting Political Corruption. Constellations 15 (1):126-147.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  20. M. O. Adeniyi (2004). An Islamic Approach to the Sustainability of Democracy. Sophia 43 (2):95-103.
    The contemporary viewpoint of many scholars is that politics and religion are two parallel discourses which never meet; or that religion is a personal matter which should not be injected into politics. Their argument for taking this stand is that the two are incongruent and therefore, it is better these are left apart. But religion is associated with morals, truthfulness, honesty and a host of moral virtues all of which are mere playthings in the hands of so-called politicians, the consequence (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  21. Jonathan E. Adler (2008). Sticks and Stones: A Reply to Warren. Journal of Social Philosophy 39 (4):639-655.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  22. M. J. Adler (1941). The Theory of Democracy. The Thomist 3:588.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  23. Mortimer J. Adler (1945). Future of Democracy. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 20:1-22.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  24. Mortimer J. Adler (1941). The Demonstrability of Democracy. New Scholasticism 15 (2):162-168.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  25. Mortimer J. Adler (1941). The Demonstrability of Democracy: A Reply to Dr. O’Neil. New Scholasticism 15 (2):162-168.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  26. Mortimer J. Adler (1939). The Demonstration of Democracy. Proceedings of the American Catholic Philosophical Association 15:122-165.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  27. Giorgio Agamben (2004). State of Exception. University of Chicago Press.
    In this highly topical book, Agamben ultimately arrives at original ideas about the future of democracy and casts a new light on the hidden relationship that ties law to violence.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   46 citations  
  28. Giorgio Agamben, Alain Badiou, Daniel Bensaïd, Wendy Brown, Jean-Luc Nancy, Jacques Rancière, Kristin Ross & Slavoj Zizek (2011). Democracy in What State? Columbia University Press.
    "Is it meaningful to call oneself a democrat? And if so, how do you interpret the word?" -/- In responding to this question, eight iconoclastic thinkers prove the rich potential of democracy, along with its critical weaknesses, and reconceive the practice to accommodate new political and cultural realities. Giorgio Agamben traces the tense history of constitutions and their coexistence with various governments. Alain Badiou contrasts current democratic practice with democratic communism. Daniel Bensaid ponders the institutionalization of democracy, while Wendy Brown (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  29. Walter Raymond Agard (1942). What Democracy Meant to the Greeks. Madison, University of Wisconsin Press.
    This book aims merely to study the human values that were sought and realized by Greek democracy, the chief problems that it faced, the measure of success and ...
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  30. Kwasi Agyeman (2003). The Quest for Moral Democracy. In J. Obi Oguejiofor (ed.), Philosophy, Democracy, and Responsible Governance in Africa. Delta Publications 1--333.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  31. Kristoffer Ahlstrom-Vij (forthcoming). The Epistemic Benefits of Democracy: A Critical Perspective. In N. J. L. L. Pedersen, M. Fricker, P. Graham & D. Henderson (eds.), The Routledge Companion to Social Epistemology.
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  32. I. Ahmad (2011). Democracy and Islam. Philosophy and Social Criticism 37 (4):459-470.
    The dominant debate on Islam and democracy continues to operate in the realm of normativity. This article engages with key literature showing limits of such a line of inquiry. Through the case study of India’s Islamist organization, Jamaat-e-Islami, I aim at shifting the debate from textual normativity to demotic praxis. I demonstrate how Islam and democracy work in practice, and in so doing offer a fresh perspective to enhance our understandings of both Islam and democracy. A key proposition of this (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (7 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  33. Timo Airaksinen (2000). Isolation and Radicalism in Democracy. Acta Philosophica Fennica 65:9-26.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  34. Timo Airaksinen (1982). Moral Education and Democracy in the School. Synthese 51 (1):117 - 134.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  35. F. Akpan (2008). Political Parties, Political Culture and Democracy in Nigeria. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 10 (1).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  36. F. Akpan (2008). The Eccentricity of the Nigerian Democratic Practices and Political Violence. Sophia: An African Journal of Philosophy 9 (2).
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  37. Robert P. Alcala (2011). Learning From the Law Democratic Education and the Requirements of Public Reason. Dissertation, Proquest
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  38. Hanan A. Alexander (2003). Moral Education and Liberal Democracy: Spirituality, Community, and Character in an Open Society. Educational Theory 53 (4):367-387.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   6 citations  
  39. Hartley B. Alexander (1917). Liberty and Democracy. International Journal of Ethics 27 (2):131-149.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  40. Hartley Burr Alexander (1918). Art and the Democracy. International Journal of Ethics 29 (1):63-87.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  41. Robert Alexy (1994). Basic Rights and Democracy in Jurgen Habermas's Procedural Paradigm of the Law. Ratio Juris 7 (2):227-238.
  42. Hamid Algar (2010). Islam, Secularism and Liberal Democracy: Toward a Democratic Theory for Muslim Societies by Nader Hashemi, 2009. [REVIEW] Journal of Shi‘a Islamic Studies 3:344-347.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  43. James Allan (2006). Thin Beats Fat yet Again – Conceptions of Democracy. Law and Philosophy 25 (5):533 - 559.
    An earlier version of this paper was presented in Sydney, Australia at the 2005 Australian Society of Legal Philosophy annual conference. The author wishes to thank all those who commented upon and criticized the paper. The author also wishes to thank two anonymous referees from this journal for their helpful suggestions.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (8 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  44. Yann Allard-Tremblay (2015). Trust and Distrust in the Achievement of Popular Control. The Monist 98 (4):375-390.
    This paper aims to deflate the idea that democracy would be in essence a privileged locus of civic trust. Three claims are defended: (1) there is nothing specific to democracy regarding the affirmation that trust is required for social cooperation; (2) democracy, when conceived discursively, depends on guarded epistemic trust and; (3) popular control may require, in some contexts, institutions that express and foster distrust towards a specific section of the population. The conclusion to be drawn is that the appropriateness (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  45. Barry Allen (2012). Experiments In Democracy. Contemporary Pragmatism 9 (2):75-92.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  46. Danielle Allen (2015). Book Review: Sharing Democracy, by Michaele L. Ferguson. [REVIEW] Political Theory 43 (6):850-854.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  47. Michael P. Allen (2006). Hegel Between Non-Domination and Expressive Freedom: Capabilities, Perspectives, Democracy. Philosophy and Social Criticism 32 (4):493-512.
    Hegel may be read as endorsing a republican conception of freedom as non-domination. This may then be allied to an expressive conception of freedom not as communal integration and non-alienation, but rather as the development of new powers and capabilities. To this extent, he may be understood as occupying a position between nondomination and expressive freedom. This not only informs contemporary discussions of republicanism and democracy, but also suggests a ‘capabilities solution’ to the otherwise intractable problem of the rabble. Key (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography   1 citation  
  48. Ernie Alleva (1990). Democracy and the Welfare State, Amy Gutmann . Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1988, Ix + 290 Pages. [REVIEW] Economics and Philosophy 6 (2):322.
  49. Peter Alter (1990). Protest and Democracy in West Germany. Extra-Parliamentary Opposition and the Democratic Agenda. History of European Ideas 12 (3):424-425.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
  50. Altman Andrew & Heath Wellman Christopher (2008). The Deontological Defense of Democracy: An Argument From Group Rights. Pacific Philosophical Quarterly 89 (3):279-293.
    Abstract: Democracy is regularly heralded as the only form of government that treats political subjects as free and equal citizens. On closer examination, however, it becomes apparent that democracy unavoidably restricts individual freedom, and it is not the only way to treat all citizens equally. In light of these observations, we argue that the non-instrumental reasons to support democratic governance stem, not from considerations of individual freedom or equality, but instead from the importance of respecting group self-determination. If this is (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    My bibliography  
1 — 50 / 3005