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  1. added 2020-06-16
    Essay Review: Psychiatry Declares Consciousness an Illusion. Manufacturing Depression: The Secret History of a Modern Disease by Gary Greenberg.Henry Bauer - 2015 - Journal of Scientific Exploration 29 (2).
    Of course psychiatry is not asserting explicitly that consciousness is just an illusion; but Gary Greenberg demonstrates that this assertion underlies implicitly what has become standard psychiatric practice: the dispensing of pills to treat purported mental illness. So the title of this book does not do justice to the depth and breadth of its contents. Still, “depression” is the book’s explicit focus throughout. History illustrates that the task of defining mental illness in general is impossible: What are the criteria for (...)
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  2. added 2020-06-15
    A Renewed, Ethical Defense of Placebo-Controlled Trials of New Treatments for Major Depression and Anxiety Disorders.B. W. Dunlop & J. Banja - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (6):384-389.
    The use of placebo as a control condition in clinical trials of major depressive disorder and anxiety disorders continues to be an area of ethical concern. Typically, opponents of placebo controls argue that they violate the beneficent-based, “best proven diagnostic and therapeutic method” that the original Helsinki Declaration of 1964 famously asserted participants are owed. A more consequentialist, oppositional argument is that participants receiving placebo might suffer enormously by being deprived of their usual medication(s). Nevertheless, recent findings of potential for (...)
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  3. added 2020-06-13
    Shame, Depression, and Social Melancholy.Kelly Oliver - 2020 - Sophia 59 (1):31-38.
    The pathologization of women’s depression covers over the social and institutional causes of that symptomology. Insofar as patriarchal values continue to devalue and debase women and mothers in ways that colonize psychic space, and depression becomes a cover for what I call ‘social melancholy.’ This is not the melancholy of traditional psychoanalysis, but a form of melancholy that results from oppression, domination, and the colonization of psychic space. Social melancholy differs from both Freud’s notion of melancholy in that it is (...)
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  4. added 2020-06-08
    Reliability and Validity of the Global Assessment of Functioning Scale in Clinical Outpatients with Depressive Disorders.Esther M. V. Grootenboer, Erik J. Giltay, Rosalind van der Lem, Tineke van Veen, Nic J. A. van der Wee & Frans G. Zitman - 2012 - Journal of Evaluation in Clinical Practice 18 (2):502-507.
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  5. added 2020-05-20
    The Omnipotent Word of Medical Diagnosis and the Silence of Depression: An Argument for Kristeva's Therapeutic Approach.Carolyn Culbertson - 2016 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 9 (1):1-26.
    It is common today to think about depression as an illness best understood and thus best managed by medical specialists. Indeed, the medical language of depression increasingly provides people with a way of signaling to others that what they suffer from needs no further elaboration. It is what it is: hormonal, genetic, a disease, words whose authority is all the more accepted the more they’re left up to specialists to interpret. Such an approach to managing sadness has its appeals. Insofar (...)
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  6. added 2020-05-15
    When Does Depression Become a Mental Disorder?Mario Maj - 2012 - In Kenneth S. Kendler & Josef Parnas (eds.), Philosophical Issues in Psychiatry Ii: Nosology. Oxford University Press.
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  7. added 2020-05-15
    Psychosocial Vulnerabilities to Depression After Acute Coronary Syndrome: The Pivotal Role of Rumination in Predicting and Maintaining Depression.Ellen-ge D. Denton, Nina Rieckmann, Karina W. Davidson & William F. Chaplin - 2012 - Frontiers in Psychology 3.
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  8. added 2020-04-30
    Epidemic Depression and Burtonian Melancholy.Jennifer Radden - 2007 - Philosophical Papers 36 (3):443-464.
    Data indicate the ubiquity and rapid increase of depression wherever war, want and social upheaval are found. The goal of this paper is to clarify such claims and draw conceptual distinctions separating the depressive states that are pathological from those that are normal and normative responses to misfortune. I do so by appeal to early modern writing on melancholy by Robert Burton, where the inchoate and boundless nature of melancholy symptoms are emphasized; universal suffering is separated from the disease states (...)
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  9. added 2020-04-29
    Melancholia: The Disease of the Soul.D. Skorzewski & A. Wiercinski (eds.) - 2014 - KUL.
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  10. added 2020-04-24
    An Expert System for Depression Diagnosis.Izzeddin A. Alshawwa, Mohammed Elkahlout, Hosni Qasim El-Mashharawi & Samy S. Abu-Naser - 2019 - International Journal of Academic Health and Medical Research (IJAHMR) 3 (4):20-27.
    Background: Depression (major depressive disorder) is a common and serious medical illness that negatively affects how you feel, the way you think and how you act. Fortunately, it is also treatable. Depression causes feelings of sadness and/or a loss of interest in activities once enjoyed. It can lead to a variety of emotional and physical problems and can decrease a person’s ability to function at work and at home. Depression affects an estimated one in 15 adults (6.7%) in any given (...)
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  11. added 2020-04-23
    Acedia and Its Relation to Depression.Derek McAllister - forthcoming - In Josefa Ros Velasco (ed.), The Faces of Depression in Literature. Bern, Switzerland: pp. 3-27.
    There has been recent work on acedia and its relationship to depression, but the results are a mixed bag. In this essay, I engage some recent scholarship comparing acedia with depression, endeavouring to clarify the concept of acedia using literature from theology, philosophy, psychiatry, and even a 16th-century treatise on witchcraft. Along the way, I will show the following key theses. First, the concept of acedia is not identical to the concept of depression. Acedia is not merely a primitive psychological (...)
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  12. added 2020-04-22
    Is Depressive Rumination Rational?Timothy Lane & Georg Northoff - 2016 - In T. W. Hung & T. J. Lane (eds.), Rationality: Constraints and Contexts. Oxford, UK: Elsevier. pp. 121-145.
    Most mental disorders affect only a small segment of the population. On the reasonable assumption that minds or brains are prone to occasional malfunction, these disorders do not seem to pose distinctive explanatory problems. Depression, however, because it is so prevalent and costly, poses a conundrum that some try to explain by characterizing it as an adaptation—a trait that exists because it performed fitness-enhancing functions in ancestral populations. Heretofore, proposed evolutionary explanations of depression did not focus on thought processes; instead, (...)
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  13. added 2020-04-21
    Models of Mental Illness.Jacqueline Sullivan - 2016 - In Harold Kincaid, Jeremy Simon & Miriam Solomon (eds.), The Routledge Companion to the Philosophy of Medicine. Routledge. pp. 455-464.
    This chapter has two aims. The first aim is to compare and contrast three different conceptual-explanatory models for thinking about mental illness with an eye towards identifying the assumptions upon which each model is based, and exploring the model’s advantages and limitations in clinical contexts. Major Depressive Disorder is used as an example to illustrate these points. The second aim is to address the question of what conceptual-theoretical framework for thinking about mental illness is most likely to facilitate the discovery (...)
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  14. added 2020-02-24
    Mending Minds: A Guide to the New Psychiatry of Depression, Anxiety, and Other Serious Mental Disorders. [REVIEW]William Roweton - 1992 - Journal of Mind and Behavior 13 (3):309-310.
    Leonard L. Heston, M.D. is a Professor of Psychiatry at The University of Washington and is the Director of The Washington Institute for Mental Illness Training and Research. Dr. Heston writes about "a QUIET revolution [which] has been occurring in psychiatry" . Dr. Heston's "new psychiatry" focuses on the "actual study of the brain as a biologic tissue" and avoids "elaborate theorizing, guru-isms, blaming of mothers for unhappiness, backbiting among contending schools, or [popular and simple] prescriptions for instant mental health. (...)
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  15. added 2020-01-30
    What Pessimism Is.Paul Prescott - 2012 - Journal of Philosophical Research 37:337-356.
    On the standard view, pessimism is a philosophically intractable topic. Against the standard view, I hold that pessimism is a stance, or compound of attitudes, commitments and intentions. This stance is marked by certain beliefs—first and foremost, that the bad prevails over the good—which are subject to an important qualifying condition: they are always about outcomes and states of affairs in which one is personally invested. This serves to distinguish pessimism from other views with which it is routinely conflated— including (...)
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  16. added 2019-12-18
    Depression’s Threat to Self-Governance.August Gorman - 2020 - Social Theory and Practice 46 (2):277-297.
    Much of the literature on impairment to self-governance focuses on cases in which a person either lacks the ability to protect herself from errant urges or cases in which a person lacks the capacity to initiate self-reflective agential processes. This has led to frameworks for thinking about self-governance designed with only the possibility of these sorts of impairments in mind. I challenge this orthodoxy using the case of melancholic depression to show that there is a third way that self-governance can (...)
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  17. added 2019-11-17
    Intimations of Immortality.Peter Fifield & Matthew Broome - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (2):141-144.
    Young’s paper (2012) offers an interesting and fruitful extension to recent work on Cotard’s syndrome, and in particular, a philosophical investigation of how and why beliefs around death and non-existence frequently co-occur with beliefs around immortality. In this brief response, we discuss a few issues from the paper. Namely, the issue of Cotard delusion being a natural kind, the seeming paradox of death and immortality and its relation to wider culture and literature, and the utility of the concept of misplaced (...)
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  18. added 2019-11-17
    From Lab Bench to Bedside... To Nowhere: Premises, Problems, and Paths.Mark D. Rego - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (2):137-141.
  19. added 2019-11-17
    Towards a Design-Based Analysis of Emotional Episodes.Ian Wright, Aaron Sloman & Luc Beaudoin - 1996 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (2):101-126.
    he design-based approach is a methodology for investigating mechanisms capable of generating mental phenomena, whether introspectively or externally observed, and whether they occur in humans, other animals or robots. The study of designs satisfying requirements for autonomous agency can provide new deep theoretical insights at the information processing level of description of mental mechanisms. Designs for working systems (whether on paper or implemented on computers) can systematically explicate old explanatory concepts and generate new concepts that allow new and richer interpretations (...)
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  20. added 2019-11-15
    Commentary on Towards a Design-Based Analysis of Emotional Episodes.Dan Lloyd - 1996 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 3 (2):127-128.
  21. added 2019-11-13
    Philosophy of Psychiatry.Dominic Murphy - 2010 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
  22. added 2019-11-13
    Dominic Murphy Psychiatry in the Scientific Image.Robin Brown - 2009 - British Journal for the Philosophy of Science 60 (3):673-678.
  23. added 2019-11-13
    Drugs, Not Hugs : Antidepressant Medication Trials and Suicidality in Children : A Case History in the Philosophy of Science as an Argument for the Need for Improved Technology in Psychiatry.Stuart Kaplan - 2008 - In James Phillips (ed.), Philosophical Perspectives on Technology and Psychiatry. Oxford University Press.
  24. added 2019-11-10
    Subjective Knowledge, Mental Disorders, and Meds: How to Parse the Equation.Mark D. Rego - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):57-60.
  25. added 2019-11-10
    The Importance of What Psychiatrists Care About.John M. Talmadge - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):241-243.
  26. added 2019-11-10
    Mourning or Melancholia.J. Melvin Woody - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):245-247.
  27. added 2019-11-10
    Explication or Explanation?Giovanni Stanghellini & Mario Rossi Monti - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):237-239.
  28. added 2019-11-10
    Truth and Healing a Veteran's Depression.Mike W. Martin - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (3):229-231.
  29. added 2019-11-08
    Husserlian Phenomenology and the Treatment of Depression: Commentary and Critique.Marilyn Nissim-Sabat - 2010 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 17 (1):53-56.
  30. added 2019-11-08
    On the Evolution of Depression.Mike W. Martin - 2002 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 9 (3):255-259.
  31. added 2019-11-07
    Is This Dame Melancholy?: Equating Today's Depression and Past Melancholia.Jennifer Radden - 2003 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 10 (1):37-52.
  32. added 2019-11-06
    Schizophrenia and the Epistemology of Self-Knowledge.Hanna Pickard - 2010 - European Journal of Analytic Philosophy 6 (1):55 - 74.
    Extant philosophical accounts of schizophrenic alien thought neglect three clinically signifi cant features of the phenomenon. First, not only thoughts, but also impulses and feelings, are experienced as alien. Second, only a select array of thoughts, impulses, and feelings are experienced as alien. Th ird, empathy with experiences of alienation is possible. I provide an account of disownership that does justice to these features by drawing on recent work on delusions and selfknowledge. Th e key idea is that disownership occurs (...)
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  33. added 2019-11-06
    Implicit and Explicit Temporality.Thomas Fuchs - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (3):195-198.
  34. added 2019-11-06
    What Are (and What Are Not) The Existential Implications of Antidepressant Use?Mark D. Rego - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (2):119-128.
  35. added 2019-11-06
    The Uses of Borrowed Knowledge: Chaos Theory and Antidepressants.Stephen H. Kellert - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (3):239-242.
  36. added 2019-11-06
    Antidepressants and the Chaotic Brain: Implications for the Respectful Treatment of Selves.Douglas W. Heinrichs - 2005 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 12 (3):215-227.
  37. added 2019-11-06
    Classifying Madness: A Philosophical Examination of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders.Rachel Cooper - unknown
    Classifying Madness (Springer, 2005) concerns philosophical problems with the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, more commonly known as the D.S.M. The D.S.M. is published by the American Psychiatric Association and aims to list and describe all mental disorders. The first half of Classifying Madness asks whether the project of constructing a classification of mental disorders that reflects natural distinctions makes sense. Chapters examine the nature of mental illness, and also consider whether mental disorders fall into natural kinds. The (...)
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  38. added 2019-11-05
    The Elephant in the Room.Somogy Varga - 2013 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (2):165-167.
    This Article is a response to thoughtful commentaries by Jennifer Radden (2013) and Louis A. Sass and Elizabeth Pienkos (2013) on my paper, which investigates the continuity between melancholia and depression. In the following, I address the challenges presented by the commentators and attempt to clarify and deepen my position. In my paper, I have explored the history of melancholia and depression with special emphasis on the question of their possible continuity—with the knowledge that any such attempt inevitably brings with (...)
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  39. added 2019-11-05
    From Melancholia to Depression: Ideas on a Possible Continuity.Somogy Varga - 2013 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (2):141-155.
    Although the Historical concept of melancholia has undergone numerous metamorphoses, it has maintained a place in psychiatric classification and currently refers to a specific melancholic subtype of major depression (American Psychiatric Association 2000, 419). Although melancholia—as a description of pathological states—constitutes the focus of this paper, it must be pointed out that the range of states encompassed by melancholia cover a far wider spectrum than that covered by the term ‘disease.’ As Jennifer Radden notes, melancholia (and melancholy) referred to “both (...)
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  40. added 2019-11-05
    Madness and Melancholia.Louis A. Sass & Elizabeth Pienkos - 2013 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 20 (2):161-164.
    It is a Pleasure to comment on Somogy Varga’s intriguing paper, which offers welcome insight into the historical sources, changing uses, and underlying assumptions pertaining to the concept of ‘melancholia,’ especially in relationship to ‘depression.’ We found Varga’s discussion of the relationship between affect and cognition in past discussions of melancholia and depression to be illuminating, especially given the emphasis on cognitive distortions in contemporary psycho-pathology. His explanation of the gradual evolution of the depression concept from melancholia sheds interesting light (...)
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  41. added 2019-11-04
    Attachment Narratives in Depression A Neurocognitive Approach.Anna Buchheim, Roberto Viviani & Henrik Walter - 2013 - Journal of Consciousness Studies 20 (7-8):7-8.
    Attachment is the way we relate to others. The way we attach to others is developed early in childhood, can be impaired by early traumatic life events, and is disturbed in many psychiatric disorders. Here we give a short overview about attachment patterns in psychiatric disorders with a focus on depression, and discuss two recent empirical studies of our own that have investigated attachment related brain activation using fMRI. In the first study with patients with borderline personality disorder we used (...)
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  42. added 2019-11-04
    Learned Helplessness, Human Depression, and Perhaps Endorphins?Salvador Algarabel - 1985 - Behavioral and Brain Sciences 8 (2):369-369.
  43. added 2019-10-29
    Commentary on "Karl Jaspers and Edmund Husserl".Ruth F. Chadwick - 1995 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 2 (1):83-84.
  44. added 2019-10-17
    "Commentary on" Suicide, Euthanasia, and the Psychiatrist".Mary Warnock - 1998 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 5 (2):127-130.
  45. added 2019-10-16
    From the Transcendental to the Enactive.Shaun Gallagher - 2012 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 19 (2):119-121.
  46. added 2019-10-16
    Belonging to the World Through the Feeling Body.Matthew Ratcliffe - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (2):205-211.
  47. added 2019-10-16
    Human Bodily Ambivalence: Precondition for Social Cognition and its Disruption in Neuropsychiatric Disorders.Aaron L. Mishara - 2009 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 16 (2):133-137.
  48. added 2019-10-16
    The Translation:" The Phenomenology of Abnormal Emotions of Happiness".W. Mayer-Gross - 2000 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (4):298-309.
  49. added 2019-10-16
    Ecstasy and Abnormal Happiness: The Two Main Syndromes Defined by Mayer-Gross.Martin Roth - 2000 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (4):317-322.
  50. added 2019-10-16
    Spandrels, Vestigial Organs, and Such: Reply to Murphy and Woolfolk's" The Harmful Dysfunction Analysis of Mental Disorder".Jerome C. Wakefield - 2000 - Philosophy, Psychiatry, and Psychology 7 (4):253-269.
    The harmful dysfunction (HD) analysis of "disorder" holds that disorders are harmful failures of "designed" (that is, naturally selected) functions. Murphy and Woolfolk (2000) present a series of proposed counterexamples to the HD analysis to support their claim that it fails to provide a necessary condition for disorder. They argue that disorder can exist where there is no failed function, as in failed spandrels and inflamed vestigial organs, and that there can be disorders when everything is working as designed, as (...)
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1 — 50 / 139