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  1. The Shackles of Reason: Sufi/Deconstructive Opposition to Rational Thought.Ian Almond - 2003 - Philosophy East and West 53 (1):22-38.
    : The status of Ibn 'Arabi and Derrida as thinkers is examined: their disagreements with rational/metaphysical thought on the basis of différance and what Ibn 'Arabi calls al-haqq or the Real. Advantage is taken of the fact that both writers speak of emancipatory projects in their work-the freeing of writing from the shackles of logocentric thought and of the unthinkably Divine (the Real) from the constructs of philosophers and theologians. Just as Ibn 'Arabi believes that no thinker can provide ''a (...)
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  2. Interpretation and Difference: The Strangeness of Care.Alan Bass - 2006 - Stanford University Press.
    This book is the companion to Difference and Disavowal: The Trauma of Eros (Stanford University Press, 2000), which dealt with the psychoanalytic clinical problem of resistance to interpretation. The key to this resistance is the unconscious registration and repudiation (disavowal) of the reality of difference. The surprising generality of this resistance intersects with Nietzsche's, Heidegger's, and Derrida's understanding of how and why difference is in general the “unthought of metaphysics.” All three see metaphysics engaged with a “registration and repudiation of (...)
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  3. Derrida en de fenomenologie : Supplement AlS oorsprong.Rudolf Bernet - 1983 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 45 (1):63 - 89.
    La lecture de Husserl proposée par Jacques Derrida s'inspire avant tout de Heidegger. Si Husserl s'intéresse au phénomène dans sa fonction constituante, Heidegger interroge plutôt ce qui constitue le phénomène. Le présupposé ou l'impensé majeur de toute philosophie de la subjectivité constituante et, plus largement, de la tradition dite onto-théologique, c'est le dévoilement de l'Etre entendu comme présence. Une philosophie nouvelle qui se veut attentive à la conjonction de l'Etre et du Temps et qui se laisse solliciter par la différence (...)
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  4. Two Versions of Continental Holism: Derrida and Structuralism.Giovanna Borradori - 2000 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 26 (4):1-22.
    The difficulty to pin down the philosophical content of structuralism depends on the fact that it operates on an implicit metaphysics; such a metaphysics can be best unfolded by examining Jacques Derrida’s deconstructionist critique of it. The essay argues that both structuralism and Derrida’s critique rely on holistic premises. From an initial externalist definition of structure, structuralism’s metaphysics emerges as a kind of ‘immanent’ holism, similar to the one pursued, in the contemporary analytic panorama, by Donald Davidson. By contrast, Derrida’s (...)
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  5. A Thing of This World: A History of Continental Anti-Realism.Lee Braver - 2007 - Northwestern University Press.
    At a time when the analytic/continental split dominates contemporary philosophy, this ambitious work offers a careful and clear-minded way to bridge that divide. Combining conceptual rigor and clarity of prose with historical erudition, A Thing of This World shows how one of the standard issues of analytic philosophy—realism and anti-realism—has also been at the heart of continental philosophy. Using a framework derived from prominent analytic thinkers, Lee Braver traces the roots of anti-realism to Kant's idea that the mind actively organizes (...)
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  6. Meaning and Reality: A Cross-Traditional Encounter.Lajos L. Brons - 2013 - In Bo Mou & R. Tieszen (eds.), Constructive Engagement of Analytic and Continental Approaches in Philosophy. Brill. pp. 199-220.
    (First paragraph.) Different views on the relation between phenomenal reality, the world as we consciously experience it, and noumenal reality, the world as it is independent from an experiencing subject, have different implications for a collection of interrelated issues of meaning and reality including aspects of metaphysics, the philosophy of language, and philosophical methodology. Exploring some of these implications, this paper compares and brings together analytic, continental, and Buddhist approaches, focusing on relevant aspects of the philosophy of Donald Davidson, Jacques (...)
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  7. The Ends of Philosophy.Lawrence Cahoone - 1995 - State University of New York Press.
    This is a critique of Peirce, Nietzsche, Wittgenstein, Buchler, Derrida, and Rorty as anti-realists, showing that each of these philosophers affirms some form of self-undermining relativism that cannot account for itself.
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  8. Three Transgressions: Nietzsche, Heidegger, Derrida.John D. Caputo - 1985 - Research in Phenomenology 15 (1):61-78.
    Nietzsche, Heidegger and Derrida: these are not merely the names of three authors, but of three matters for thought, of three ways beyond metaphysics, three transgressions. I want to offer here a reflection, first, upon the dynamics of these transgressions—how each conceives metaphysics and where each makes its move against metaphysics—and, then, upon the relationships of the three to one another, on the interplay of their transgressive practices.
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  9. Metaphor and Continental Philosophy: From Kant to Derrida.Clive Cazeaux - 2007 - Routledge.
    Over the last few decades there has been a phenomenal growth of interest in metaphor as a device which extends or revises our perception of the world. Clive Cazeaux examines the relationship between metaphor, art and science, against the backdrop of modern European philosophy and, in particular, the work of Kant, Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty. He contextualizes recent theories of the cognitive potential of metaphor within modern European philosophy and explores the impact which the notion of cognitive metaphor has on key (...)
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  10. La phénoménologie et la clôture de la métaphysique”[1966].Jacques Derrida - 2000 - Alter. Revue de Phénoménologie 8:69-84.
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  11. Hegel and Derrida on the Subject. [REVIEW]Andrew Dunstall - 2017 - Derrida Today 10 (2):243-251.
    A review essay on Simon Lumsden’s (UNSW) Self-Consciousness and the Critique of the Subject (Columbia University Press, 2014), assessing Lumsden’s Hegelian account of Self-Consciousness in comparison with Derrida’s in “The Pit and the Pyramid” (in Margins of Philosophy). Lumsden de-emphasises the teleology of presence in Hegel’s work, especially the Phenomenology of Spirit. Instead, he concentrates on how processes of intuition and concept for Hegel demonstrate the continued change of historical meaning. The result is an account that is very close to (...)
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  12. Badiou Versus Derrida: Truth, Sets, and Sophistry.David Fiorovanti - 2012 - Philosophical Forum 43 (1):51-64.
    This article explores the question of truth in the work of Jacques Derrida and Alain Badiou. Specifically, it investigates Badiou’s claim that deconstruction is a form of sophistry. Badiou positions himself against Derrida in preference for a philosophy committed to Truth, Being and the event. The sophist, in contrast to the philosopher, denies the existence of truths and the category of truth. Despite this hostility, Badiou argues that the two must coexist. Badiou also explores the relationship between existence and inexistence (...)
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  13. Is Self-Consciousness a Case of Presence À Soi? Towards a Meta-Critique of the Recent French Critique of Metaphysics.Manfred Frank - 1992 - In David Wood (ed.), Derrida: A Critical Reader. Blackwell. pp. 218--34.
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  14. Meillassoux’s Speculative Philosophy of Science: Contingency and Mathematics.Fabio Gironi - 2011 - Pli 22:26-61.
    In this paper I will offer a survey of Quentin Meillassoux’s thought, focusing on what I identify as the central node of his thought, the link between mathematics and contingency. I will then proceed to question the compatibility of his principle of radical contingency with the philosophy—and the practice—of science, and I will propose a possible solution to this problem by pushing Meillassoux along the Pythagorean path. Finally, I will argue that 1) his project of evacuating metaphysical necessity via a (...)
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  15. On the Problematic Origin of the Forms: Plotinus, Derrida, and the Neoplatonic Subtext of Deconstruction's Critique of Ontology.Matthew C. Halteman - 2006 - Continental Philosophy Review 39 (1):35-58.
    My aim in this paper is to draw Plotinus and Derrida together in a comparison of their respective appropriations of the famous “receptacle” passage in Plato's Timaeus (specifically, Plotinus' discussion of intelligible matter in Enneads 2.4 and Derrida's essay on Timaeus entitled “Kh ō ra”). After setting the stage with a discussion of several instructive similarities between their general philosophical projects, I contend that Plotinus and Derrida take comparable approaches both to thinking the origin of the forms and to problematizing (...)
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  16. Derrida and the Concept of Metaphysics.Irene E. Harvey - 1983 - Research in Phenomenology 13 (1):113-148.
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  17. Thinking "Difference" Differently: Cassirer Versus Derrida on Symbolic Mediation.Aud Sissel Hoel - 2011 - Synthese 179 (1):75 - 91.
    Cassirer's approach to symbolic mediation differs in some important ways from currently prevailing approaches to meaning and signification such as semiology and its more recent poststructuralist varieties. Cassirer's philosophy of symbolic forms offers a theory of symbols that does not amount to a sign theory or semiology. It sketches out, rather, a dynamic and nonrepresentational framework in which an alternative notion of difference takes centre stage. In order to make the original features of Cassirer's approach stand out, I will compare (...)
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  18. Review: A.W. Moore, The Evolution of Modern Metaphysics: Making Sense of Things. [REVIEW]Ingvar Johansson - 2013 - Metaphysica 14 (1):127-142.
    I find the book about metaphysics under review an important and remarkable book, some of my very critical remarks notwithstanding. It is divided into three parts of seven chapters each. The parts are called “The Early Modern Period” (Descartes, Spinoza, Leibniz, Hume, Kant, Fichte, Hegel), “The Analytic Tradition” (Frege, Early Wittgenstein, Later Wittgenstein, Carnap, Quine, Lewis, Dummett), and “The Non-analytic Tradition” (Nietzsche, Bergson, Husserl, Heidegger, Collingwood, Derrida, Deleuze). As can be seen, Moore has with respect to the third group deleted (...)
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  19. Realism, Discourse, and Deconstruction.Jonathan Joseph & John M. Roberts (eds.) - 2003 - Routledge.
    Theories of discourse bring to realism new ideas about how knowledge develops and how representations of reality are influenced. We gain an understanding of the conceptual aspect of social life and the processes by which meaning is produced. This collection reflects the growing interest realist critics have shown towards forms of discourse theory and deconstruction. The diverse range of contributions address such issues as the work of Derrida and deconstruction, discourse theory, Eurocentrism and poststructuralism. What unites all of the contributions (...)
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  20. Jewish Messianism and the History of Philosophy.Martin Kavka - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Jewish Messianism and the History of Philosophy contests the ancient opposition between Athens and Jerusalem by retrieving the concept of meontology - the doctrine of nonbeing - from the Jewish philosophical and theological tradition. For Emmanuel Levinas, as well as for Franz Rosenzweig, Hermann Cohen and Moses Maimonides, the Greek concept of nonbeing clarifies the meaning of Jewish life. These thinkers of 'Jerusalem' use 'Athens' for Jewish ends, justifying Jewish anticipation of a future messianic era as well as portraying the (...)
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  21. Language and Being: Crossroads of Modern Literary Theory and Classical Ontology.Henry McDonald - 2004 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 30 (2):187-220.
    My argument is that poststructuralist and postmodernist theory carries on and intensifies the main lines of a characteristically modern tradition of aesthetics whose most important point of reference is not French structuralism – as the term, ‘poststructuralism’, implies – but the tradition of 18th-century German romanticism and idealism that culminated in the work of Heidegger during the Weimar period in Germany between the world wars and afterward. What characterizes this modernist tradition of aesthetics is its valorization of language as a (...)
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  22. Cosmological Postmodernism in Whitehead, Deleuze, and Derrida.Sam Mickey - 2008 - Process Studies 37 (2):24-44.
    This essay presents some points of dialogue between process thinking and post-structuralism, particularly in light of the metaphysical cosmology of Alfred North Whitehead and the post-structuralist philosophies of Gilles Deleuze and Jacques Derrida. This dialogue facilitates the emergence of a cosmologicalpostmodernism. Through the creation of concepts that situate the human within the networks, processes, and mutually constitutive relations of the cosmos, cosmological postmodernism re-envisions the worldview of modernity and overcomes its reification and dichotomization of the human and the world. Four (...)
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  23. Derrida and Whitehead: Pathways of Process and the Critique of Essentialism.Tim Mooney - manuscript
    A rejection of the notion of substance, an emphasis on intraworldly experience and an incorporation of ideas from modern biology are just three of the distinctive features of Alfred North Whitehead’s process metaphysics or philosophy of organism. The last two features give his scheme a heavily naturalistic tinge, despite his positing of eternal objects or universal forms of definiteness, which - together with subjective aims or final causes - are instantiated in a divinity prior to worldly realization.1 Such a naturalism (...)
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  24. A Critical Response to Zhang Longxi.Timothy J. Nulty - 2002 - Asian Philosophy 12 (2):141 – 146.
    This is essay is a critical response to Zhang Longxi's argument that Taoist philosophy is susceptible to Derrida's arguments against logocentrism. I present two main arguments. First, I argue that Zhang fails to provide sufficient evidence that would show Taoism is logocentric. Moreover, even if Zhang could provide support for such a claim there cannot be a general deconstructive argument against logocentrism. Derrida's arguments against logocentrism work from within a specific text. The second argument offers reasons for believing Taoism is (...)
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  25. Deregionalizing Ontology: Derrida's Khōra.Herman Rapaport - 2008 - Derrida Today 1 (1):95-118.
    The purpose of the essay is to contextualize and explain the philosophical project that is under way in Jacques Derrida's Khōraof 1993. Upon a cursory reading, the book will appear to be merely the unpacking of yet another undecidable term that Derrida has located within the history of metaphysics. But, in fact, the stakes of this text are much higher in that Derrida's aim is to continue developing a project that was announced in the late 1960s, namely, to deregionalize ontology. (...)
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  26. A Hegelian Critique of Derrida's Deconstructionism.Giacomo Rinaldi - 1999 - Philosophy and Theology 11 (2):311-347.
    This article offers a general “immanent” critique of Derrida’s Deconstructionism, whose positive outcome is an argument for the continuing viability of a Hegel-oriented idealistic metaphysics. Derrida’s thought is construed as an unspokenly skeptical and nihilistic development of Heidegger’s existential ontology and of the sensu latiori “structuralist” trend of contemporary human sciences. The main difficulties pointed out hinge on (§ 1) the relationship deconstructionism establishes between thought and language, speech and writing, and phonetic and non-phonetic writing, (§ 2) its paradoxical concept (...)
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  27. Wittgenstein's Metaphysical Use and Derrida's Metaphysical Appurtenance.Rootham Mireille M. Truong - 1996 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 22 (2):27-46.
    Everything about Derrida suggests that he is for a radical reform or transformation of language, whilst Wittgenstein seems to vindicate a fidelity to ordinary language and to want to 'expunge' from language the 'metaphysical use' of words. But just how opposed are they? My contention in this paper is that Wittgenstein does not 'deconstruct', as some critics have rather loosely suggested, because, as we shall see, the expunging of metaphysical use favoured by Wittgenstein does not amount to the deconstruction of (...)
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  28. Writing Faith.Timothy Stanley - 2017 - Minneapolis: Fortress Press.
    This book provides a novel reevaluation of Jacques Derrida’s deconstructive account of writing. Derrida’s various essays on writing's materiality in books, scrolls, typewriters and digital displays, briefly touched on the question of religion. At times he directed his attention to the mediatic nature of Christianity. However, such comments have rarely been applied to formal aspects of religious texts. In response, this book investigates the rise of the Christian codex in its second-to-fifth-century-CE Jewish and Greco-Roman contexts. By better understanding the religious (...)
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Derrida: Differance
  1. The Young Derrida and French Philosophy, 1945–1968.Edward Baring - 2011 - Cambridge University Press.
    Machine generated contents note: Introduction; Part I. Derrida Post-Existentialist: 1. Humanist pretensions: Catholics, Communists and Sartre's struggle for existentialism in post-war France; 2. Derrida's 'Christian' existentialism; 3. Normalization: the École Normale Supe;rieure and Derrida's turn to Husserl; 4. Genesis as a problem: Derrida reading Husserl; 5. The God of mathematics: Derrida and the origin of geometry; Part II. Between Phenomenology and Structuralism: 6. A history of diffe;rance; 7. L'ambiguite; du concours: the deconstruction of commentary and interpretation in Speech and Phenomena; (...)
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  2. Handshake.Geoffrey Bennington - 2008 - Derrida Today 1 (2):167-184.
    How might Derrida be said to greet Jean-Luc Nancy in Le Toucher? What kind of handshake does he offer? Derrida explicitly mentions the handshake at the very centre of his book, in the tangent devoted to Merleau-Ponty. A reading of this moment reveals an exemplary case of what happens when Derrida reads apparently ‘fraternal’ texts, and opens up further levels of difference. What then if we consider Nancy's response to Derrida, when the recipient of the handshake shakes back? By examining (...)
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  3. Tragedy, Dialectics, and Différance: On Hegel and Derrida.Karin Boer - 2001 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 39 (3):331-357.
  4. A Taoist Interpretation of "Differance" in Derrida.Chung-Ying Cheng - 1990 - Journal of Chinese Philosophy 17 (1):19-30.
  5. Epimetheus Bound: Stiegler on Derrida, Life, and the Technological Condition.Tracy Colony - 2011 - Research in Phenomenology 41 (1):72-89.
    Bernard Stiegler's account of technology as constitutive of the human as such is without precedent. However, Stiegler's work must also be understood in terms of its explicit appropriations from the thought of Jacques Derrida. An important, yet overlooked, context for framing Stiegler's relation to Derrida is the question of nonhuman life thought in terms of différance . As I argue, Stiegler's account does not unfold the most profound implications of Derrida's understanding of nonhuman life as différance . While Stiegler describes (...)
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  6. The Trace of Legal Idealism in Derrida's Grammatology.William E. Conklin - 1996 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 22 (5):17-42.
    Against a background of Heidegger's project of tracing the other back through the history of metaphysics, Derrida attempts to think the other as outside of identity or presencing philosophy. The other is neither present nor absent. The other is differance with an 'a'. In his important essay 'Differance', Derrida suggests that whereas difference presupposes identity, differance with an 'a' is a 'middle voice' which precedes and sets up the opposition between identity and non-identity. The soft 'a' refers to the production (...)
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  7. Derrida's Differance and Plato's Different.Samuel C. Wheeler Iii - 1999 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 59 (4):999 - 1013.
    This essay shows that Derrida's discussion of "Differance," is remarkably parallel to Plato's discussion of Difference in the Parmenides. Plato's presentation of "Parmenides'" discussion of generation from a One which Is is a version of Derrida's preconceptual spacing. Derrida's implicit reference to Plato both interprets Plato and explains the obscure features of "Differance." Derrida's paradoxical remarks about Differance are very like what Plato implies about Difference. Derrida's Differance addresses the puzzle that concepts are required to construct the beings in a (...)
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  8. ›Une sorte de remontée vers le corps‹. Skizze einer Ästhetik der körperlichen Responsivität im Ausgang von Roland Barthes’ Überlegungen zur Pseudo-Schrift.Schwerzmann Katia - 2014 - Kodikas/Code. Ars Semeiotica 37 (3/4):249-260.
    The sensory dimension of writing, which is never fully neutralised in the process of semiosis, remains aporetic in Derrida’s philosophy. I show how Barthes’ observations on pseudo-writing lead to his understanding of writing as a gesture, opening up post-structuralism to the body as absolutely non-repeatable, as the opposite of semiosis. The examination of Barthes’ account of the relationship between writing and the body leads to an aesthetic of physical responsiveness, which challenges the distinction between work, creator and viewer. In this (...)
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  9. The Self as Resolution: Heidegger, Derrida and the Intimacy of the Question of the Meaning of Being.John Russon - 2008 - Research in Phenomenology 38 (1):90-110.
    Because Dasein, as conceived by Heidegger, is inherently temporal, the "who" of Dasein can never be defined simply in terms of a present identity but must have the character of what Derrida calls "différance." Dasein 's authenticity, then, must be an embracing of this, its character as différance. This means that the "self" is "neither a substance nor a subject " but a resolution. The anticipatory resoluteness of authenticity, however, is a unique kind of resolve: it is the resolve to (...)
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  10. Reading: Derrida in Hegel's Understanding.John Russon - 2006 - Research in Phenomenology 36 (1):181-200.
    Hegel's dialectic "Consciousness," Part A from the Phenomenology of Spirit, is interpreted in light of the concept of "reading." The logic of reading is especially helpful for interpreting the often misunderstood dialectic of understanding, as that is described in chapter 3 of the Phenomenology, "Force and Understanding: Appearance and the Supersensible World." Hegel's concept of "the Inverted World" in particular is clarified, and from it Hegel's notion of originary difference is developed. Derrida's notion of "differance" is used to illuminate Hegel's (...)
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  11. The Ghost of the Unnameable.Roy Sellars - 2012 - Derrida Today 5 (2):248-263.
    According to Jacques Derrida, there is a différance – his infamous mis-spelling of the French différence – that ‘has no name in our language’ (‘Différance’, in Margins of Philosophy); its name is not différance, and it is not just nameless but ‘unnameable’. ‘The a of différance’, he also tells us, ‘remains silent, secret and discreet as a tomb’. My essay, which is haunted throughout by Derrida, seeks to address the following question: if the a of différance is like a tomb, (...)
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  12. The Idea of Open in the Thought of Jacques Derrida.Mengxue Wu - manuscript
    Abstract: This Thesis is to examine Jacques Derrida’s idea of trace, différance, and supplement; to examine whether or not they have a structure of open. By closely reading Derrida’s Speech and Phenomena, “Violence and Metaphysics”, Of Grammatology, and “Différance,” I will discuss this question in two levels of inquiry: one is on the microscopic scope and the other one is on the large-scale scope. In the microscopic scope, Derrida’s trace, différance, and supplement can be regarded as open, because trace, différance, (...)
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  13. Derrida's Open and Its Closure: The Aporia of Différance and the Only Logic of Thinking.Mengxue Wu - 2018 - Language, Literature, Interdisciplinary Studies 2 (1):76-98.
    Derrida’s thought on “trace,” “différance,” “writing,” and “supplement” is always thought the breaking of logocentrism, the essence, the positive meaning, and the closure of the metaphysics of presence; this thinking is accordingly regarded the thinking with the fundamental structure of difference and openness. By tracking back to Saussure, Husserl and Levinas, this fundamental difference breaks the myth of ideal meaning as well as the illusion of the absolute open; its lack of ideality and absoluteness contains the fundamental difference within itself (...)
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Derrida: Iterability
  1. Iterability and Meaning: The Searle-Derrida Debate.Frank B. Farrell - 1988 - Metaphilosophy 19 (1):53–64.
  2. ›Une sorte de remontée vers le corps‹. Skizze einer Ästhetik der körperlichen Responsivität im Ausgang von Roland Barthes’ Überlegungen zur Pseudo-Schrift.Schwerzmann Katia - 2014 - Kodikas/Code. Ars Semeiotica 37 (3/4):249-260.
    The sensory dimension of writing, which is never fully neutralised in the process of semiosis, remains aporetic in Derrida’s philosophy. I show how Barthes’ observations on pseudo-writing lead to his understanding of writing as a gesture, opening up post-structuralism to the body as absolutely non-repeatable, as the opposite of semiosis. The examination of Barthes’ account of the relationship between writing and the body leads to an aesthetic of physical responsiveness, which challenges the distinction between work, creator and viewer. In this (...)
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  3. Sinn und Gedächtnis. Die Zeitlichkeit des Sinns und die Figuren ihrer Reflexion.Thomas Khurana - 2007 - München: Wilhelm Fink Verlag.
  4. Positing and Iterability: Jacques Derrida's Thought of the Performative.Mauro Senatore - unknown
    In Memoires for Paul de Man (1986) Derrida acknowledges the urgency, for any rigorous deconstruction, of closely confronting Austin's notion of the performative. This study aims to countersign Derrida' s acknowledgement by elaborating a certain deconstructive tradition of thinking the performativity of the performative and, thus, of retracing the performative (as auto-performative) back to the modem philosophical tradition of (self- )positing. In particular, it focuses on Derrida's thought of the iterability of the (auto-)performative, as the speech act of self-positing. The (...)
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Derrida: Time
  1. Bergson and Derrida: A Question of Writing Time as Philosophy's Other.Daniel Alipaz - 2011 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 19 (2):96-120.
    Following the 1988 publication of Bergsonism by Gilles Deleuze, many contemporary critics such as Leonard Lawlor and Paul Douglass have re-contextualized Bergson within poststructuralism. In so doing, Bergsonian theory enables us to readdress questions associated with concepts of temporality and their relation to language. In considering this re-appropriation, Suzanne Guerlac in Thinking in Time: an introduction to Henri Bergson (2006), asks why Bergson has never been considered in relation to Derrida, given that the two philosophers share fundamental concerns about time (...)
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  2. Quantum Entanglements and Hauntological Relations of Inheritance: Dis/Continuities, SpaceTime Enfoldings, and Justice-to-Come.Karen Barad - 2010 - Derrida Today 3 (2):240-268.
    How much of philosophical, scientific, and political thought is caught up with the idea of continuity? What if it were otherwise? This paper experiments with the disruption of continuity. The reader is invited to participate in a performance of spacetime (re)configurings that are more akin to how electrons experience the world than any journey narrated though rhetorical forms that presume actors move along trajectories across a stage of spacetime (often called history). The electron is here invoked as our host, an (...)
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  3. On Post-Heideggerean Difference: Derrida and Deleuze.Daniel Colucciello Barber - 2009 - Southern Journal of Philosophy 47 (2):113-129.
    This paper takes up the Heideggerean question of difference. I argue that while Heidegger raises this question, his response to the question remains ambiguous and that this ambiguity pivots around the question of time. The bulk of the paper then looks at how Derrida and Deleuze respectively attempt to advance beyond Heidegger’s ambiguity regarding the questions of difference and time. Derrida is able to demonstrate the manner in which time—as delay—is constitutive of any attempt to think difference. I argue, however, (...)
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  4. Fatally Confused: Telling the Time in the Midst of Ecological Crises.Michelle Bastian - 2012 - Journal of Environmental Philosophy 9 (1):23-48.
    Focusing particularly on the role of the clock in social life, this article explores the conventions we use to “tell the time.” I argue that although clock time generally appears to be an all-encompassing tool for social coordination, it is actually failing to coordinate us with some of the most pressing ecological changes currently taking place. Utilizing philosophical approaches to performativity to explore what might be going wrong, I then draw on Derrida’s and Haraway’s understandings of social change in order (...)
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  5. Inventing Nature: Re-Writing Time and Agency in a More-Than-Human World.Michelle Bastian - 2009 - Australian Humanities Review 47:99-116.
    This paper is a response to Val Plumwoods call for writers to engage in ‘the struggle to think differently’. Specifically, she calls writers to engage in the task of opening up an experience of nature as powerful and as possessing agency. I argue that a critical component of opening up who or what can be understood as possessing agency involves challenging the conception of time as linear, externalised and absolute, particularly in as much as it has guided Western conceptions of (...)
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