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  1. Russell Daylight, What If Derrida Was Wrong About Saussure?Marco Altamirano - 2012 - Journal of French and Francophone Philosophy 20 (1):147-152.
    Review of Russell Daylight, What If Derrida Was Wrong About Saussure?
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  2. Traité de Tous les Noms (What Is Called Naming).Gil Anidjar - 2006 - Epoché: A Journal for the History of Philosophy 10 (2):287-301.
    What’s in a name after Derrida? What’s in a name after all? What is a name such that it always already remains, after all is said and done? And who or what is itthat one calls name, names, or by name? Is it possible not to have a name of one’s own? Or to have another? The same as another? Is it possible to call and recall, in the name of memory and remembrance, indifference or convention, one name for another, (...)
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  3. "Our Place in Al-Andalus": Kabbalah, Philosophy, Literature in Arab Jewish Letters.Gil Anidjar - 2002 - Stanford University Press.
    The year 1492 is only the last in a series of “ends” that inform the representation of medieval Spain in modern Jewish historical and literary discourses. These ends simultaneously mirror the traumas of history and shed light on the discursive process by which hermetic boundaries are set between periods, communities, and texts. This book addresses the representation of the twelfth and thirteenth centuries as the end of al-Andalus (Islamic Spain). Here, the end works to locate and separate Muslim from Christian (...)
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  4. Logocentrism and the Gathering Λόγος: Heidegger, Derrida, and the Contextual Centers of Meaning.Jussi Backman - 2012 - Research in Phenomenology 42 (1):67-91.
    Abstract Derrida's deconstructive strategy of reading texts can be understood as a way of highlighting the irreducible plurality of discursive meaning that undermines the traditional Western “logocentric“ desire for an absolute point of reference. While his notion of logocentrism was modeled on Heidegger's articulation of the traditional ontotheological framework of Aristotelian metaphysics, Derrida detects a logocentric remnant in Heidegger's own interpretation of gathering ( Versammlung ) as the basic movement of λόγος, discursiveness. However, I suggest that Derrida here touches upon (...)
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  5. The Truth (and Untruth) of Language: Heidegger, Ricoeur, and Derrida on Disclosure and Displacement. By Gert‐Jan van der Heiden. Pp. 244, Pittsburgh, PA, Duquesne University Press, 2010, $20.54. [REVIEW]Lauren Swayne Barthold - 2014 - Heythrop Journal 55 (4):739-742.
  6. Inventing Nature: Re-Writing Time and Agency in a More-Than-Human World.Michelle Bastian - 2009 - Australian Humanities Review 47:99-116.
    This paper is a response to Val Plumwoods call for writers to engage in ‘the struggle to think differently’. Specifically, she calls writers to engage in the task of opening up an experience of nature as powerful and as possessing agency. I argue that a critical component of opening up who or what can be understood as possessing agency involves challenging the conception of time as linear, externalised and absolute, particularly in as much as it has guided Western conceptions of (...)
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  7. Listening to Phonocentrism with Deaf Eyes: Derrida's Mute Philosophy of (Sign) Language.H. Bauman - 2008 - Essays in Philosophy 9 (1):2.
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  8. De-Divinization and the Vindication of Everyday Life: Reply to Rorty.J. M. Bernstein - 1992 - Tijdschrift Voor Filosofie 54 (4):668 - 692.
    This essay originated as a reply to Richard Rorty's ”Habermas, Derrida, and the Functions of Philosophy“. In it, I contest Rorty's deployment of the categories of private selfcreation and the collective political enterprise of increasing freedom, first developed in Contingency, Irony and Solidarity, to demonstrate that the philosophical projects of Habermas and Derrida are complementary rather than antagonistic. The focus of my critique is two-fold: firstly, I contend that so-called critiques of metaphysics are always simutaneously engaging with some form of (...)
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  9. Übergangsholismus. Holismus, Veränderung und Kontinuität in den Sprachphilosophien von Davidson und Derrida.Georg W. Bertram - 2002 - Zeitschrift für Philosophische Forschung 56 (3):388 - 413.
    "Übergangsholismus" entwickelt Ansätze zu einer begrifflichen Rekonstruktion des semantischen Holismus nach Davidson und Derrida. Ich argumentiere dafür, dass eine solche Rekonstruktion ohne den Begriff des Ganzen auskommt. Den Ausgangspunkt bildet Derridas Konzept der différance, das als Konzept für die Beziehungen in holistischen Strukturen vorgestellt wird. Die Elemente einer holistischen Struktur werden demnach durch die Beziehungen, in denen sie stehen, bestimmt. Solche Bestimmung aber ist, wie ich im Anschluss diskutiere, an Praktiken mit sprachlichen Ausdrücken gebunden. Mit Derrida wird so ein unauftrennbarer (...)
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  10. Meaning, Truth, and Phenomenology.Mark Bevir - 2000 - Metaphilosophy 31 (4):412-426.
    This essay approaches Derrida through a consideration of his writings on Saussure and Husserl. Derrida is right to insist, following Saussure, on a relational theory of meaning: words do not have a one-to-one correspondence with their referents. But he is wrong to insist on a purely differential theory of meaning: words can refer to reality within the context of a body of knowledge. Similarly, Derrida is right to reject Husserl's idea of presence: no truths are simply given to consciousness. But (...)
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  11. The Truth (and Untruth) of Language: Heidegger, Ricoeur, and Derrida on Disclosure and Displacement Gert-Jan van der Heiden Pittsburgh, PA: Duquesne University Press, 2010; 296 Pp.; $25.00 (Paperback). [REVIEW]Garrett Zantow Bredeson - 2011 - Dialogue 50 (2):407-409.
  12. Meaning and Reality: A Cross-Traditional Encounter.Lajos L. Brons - 2013 - In Bo Mou & R. Tieszen (eds.), Constructive Engagement of Analytic and Continental Approaches in Philosophy. Brill. pp. 199-220.
    (First paragraph.) Different views on the relation between phenomenal reality, the world as we consciously experience it, and noumenal reality, the world as it is independent from an experiencing subject, have different implications for a collection of interrelated issues of meaning and reality including aspects of metaphysics, the philosophy of language, and philosophical methodology. Exploring some of these implications, this paper compares and brings together analytic, continental, and Buddhist approaches, focusing on relevant aspects of the philosophy of Donald Davidson, Jacques (...)
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  13. The End of Comparative Philosophy and the Task of Comparative Thinking: Heidegger, Derrida, and Daoism.Steven Burik - 2009 - State University of New York Press.
    A work of and about comparative philosophy that stresses the importance of language in intercultural endeavors.
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  14. The Purloined Hegel: Semiology in the Thought of Saussure and Derrida.Tony Burns - 2000 - History of the Human Sciences 13 (4):1-24.
    This paper explores the thought of Hegel, Saussure and Derrida regarding the nature of the linguistic sign. It argues that Derrida is right to maintain that Hegel is an influence on Saussure. However, Derrida misrepresents both Hegel and Saussure by interpreting them as falling within the Platonic rather than the Aristotelian philosophical tradition.
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  15. Nothing Outside the Text: Derrida and Brandom on Language and World.Stephen S. Bush - 2009 - Contemporary Pragmatism 6 (2):45-69.
    The terms deconstruction and différence are central to both Jacques Derrida's work and to poststructuralism generally. These terms attempt to provide an alternative to metaphysical construals of linguistic meaning. I compare Derrida's discussion of linguistic meaning and reference with the contemporary pragmatist, Robert Brandom, arguing that Brandom has important similarities to Derrida. However, whereas Derrida remains committed to metaphysics even as he tries to contest it, Brandom, to his credit, more thoroughly rejects metaphysics.
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  16. Breves consideraciones acerca del concepto de escritura en la propuesta post-estructuralista de Jaques Derrida: Aportes sobre algunos problemas del lenguaje.Cristian Cardozo - 2010 - Astrolabio: Nueva Época 1.
    Breves consideraciones acerca del concepto de escritura en la propuesta post-estructuralista de Jaques Derrida: Aportes sobre algunos problemas del lenguaje.
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  17. Living Metaphor.Clive Cazeaux - 2011 - Studi Filosofici 34 (1):291-308.
    The concept of ‘living metaphor’ receives a number of articulations within metaphor theory. A review of four key theories – Nietzsche, Ricoeur, Lakoff and Johnson, and Derrida – reveals a distinction between theories which identify a prior, speculative nature working on or with metaphor, and theories wherein metaphor is shown to be performatively always, already active in thought. The two cannot be left as alternatives because they exhibit opposing theses with regard to the ontology of metaphor, but neither can an (...)
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  18. Metaphor and Continental Philosophy: From Kant to Derrida.Clive Cazeaux - 2007 - Routledge.
    Over the last few decades there has been a phenomenal growth of interest in metaphor as a device which extends or revises our perception of the world. Clive Cazeaux examines the relationship between metaphor, art and science, against the backdrop of modern European philosophy and, in particular, the work of Kant, Heidegger and Merleau-Ponty. He contextualizes recent theories of the cognitive potential of metaphor within modern European philosophy and explores the impact which the notion of cognitive metaphor has on key (...)
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  19. Untimely Politics.Samuel Allen Chambers - 2003 - New York University Press.
    "[T]he richness of his analysis, [...] his poststrucuralist emphasis on genealogy, historicity, temporality, and discourse can supplement the sometimes arid terms of the agency/structure debate. [...] An invitation to readers who might not normally turn to Continental theory for methodological inspiration, to learn from Chamber's splendid, and, yesy, timely volume." -Diana Coole, Queen Mary University of London , from a book review in the June 04 Perspectives The standard, linear view of history is founded on the belief that political outcomes (...)
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  20. Notes Towards a Semiotics of Parasitism.Han-Liang Chang - 2003 - Sign Systems Studies 31 (2):421-438.
    The metaphor of parasites or parasitism has dominated literary critical discourse since the 1970s, prominent examples being Michel Serres in France and J. Hillis Miller in America. In their writings the relationship between text and paratext, literature and criticism, is often likened to that between host and parasite, and can be therefore deconstructed. Their writings, along with those by Derrida, Barthes, and Thom, seem to be suggesting the possibility of a semiotics of parasitism. Unfortunately, none of these writers has drawn (...)
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  21. Herman Rapaport, Heidegger & Derrida: Reflections on Time and Language Reviewed By.Deborah Cook - 1990 - Philosophy in Review 10 (10):427-429.
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  22. Metaphor and Derrida's Philosophy of Language.David E. Cooper - 2008 - In Robert Eaglestone & Simon Glendinning (eds.), Derrida's Legacies: Literature and Philosophy. Routledge.
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  23. Derrida and Bhartrhari's Vākyapadīya on the Origin of Language.Harold Coward - 1990 - Philosophy East and West 40 (1):3-16.
  24. Derrida and Indian Philosophy.Harold Coward - 1990 - State University of New York Press.
    Coward (religious studies, U. of Calgary) explores the similarities and differences between the language theories of modern French philosopher Jacques Derrida and several traditional Indian schools of thought.
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  25. Deconstruction and Translation: The Passage Into Philosophy.Marc Crépon - 2006 - Research in Phenomenology 36 (1):299-313.
    In taking up the question of translation as its guiding thread, this essay considers the extent to which deconstruction consists in a radical calling into question of the type of thought and practice of translation implied in what Derrida has called "the passage into philosophy." At the same time, a whole other thought of translation —of the very kind that Derrida put into practice—is demanded insofar as something like the survival of works and the very possibility of a tradition are (...)
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  26. Inspiration, Sublimation and Speech.Clayton Crockett - 2008 - Philosophy in the Contemporary World 15 (2):62-71.
    Ralph Ellis discusses inspiration in important philosophical and psychological ways, and this response to his essay both appreciates and amplifies his discussion and its conclusions by framing them in terms of sublimation and speech, using insights from the work of Jacques Lacan, Jacques Derrida, and Gilles Deleuze. Inspiration is not derived from another plane of existence, but refers to tbe creation of human meaning and value. Inspiration as a form of sublimation conceives sublimation as a process of substitution that avoids (...)
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  27. Husserl, Derrida, and the Phenomenology of Expression.Steven Galt Crowell - 1996 - Philosophy Today 40 (1-4):61-70.
    This article examines the presuppositions underlying Derrida's criticisms of Husserl's theory of expression, and philosophy of language generally. I argue that Derrida's claim that indication (and so the sign-function) is present at the heart of phenomenological "expression" is based on an unwarranted substitution of a Hegelian structure of reflection for Husserl's own phenomenological concept of reflection and evidence. I then criticize a different sort of unclarity in Husserl's analysis of the noetic and noematic relations between "expressive" (linguistic) and "preexpressive" sense. (...)
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  28. Telling Time: Sketch of a Phenomenological Chronology.Françoise Dastur - 2000 - Althone Press.
    Telling Time takes up Heidegger's ideas of a "phenomenological chronology" in an attempt to pose the question of the possibility of a phenomenological language that would be given over to the "temporality of being" and the finitude of existence. The book combines a discussion of approaches to language in the philosophical tradition with readings of Husserl on temporality and the early and late texts of Heidegger's on logic, truth and the nature of language. As well as Heidegger's "deconstruction" of logic (...)
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  29. On Speech and Temporality: Derrida and Husserl.Bernard P. Dauenhauer - 1974 - Philosophy Today 18 (3):171-180.
    This paper provides evidence, Against an important husserlian thesis, Showing that the constitution of meaningful expression intrinsically involves both a plurality of temporal moments and other egos. Likewise against derrida, This evidence points away from the claim that all meaningful expression is constituted only in full empirical intersubjective dialogue. This evidence is developed by examining molly bloom's soliloquy. The tentative conclusions reached are: 1) all sayable meanings belong to a range of expressions whose scope is bound up with the distinctness (...)
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  30. The imposible of the death – of Jacques Derrida. [Spanish].Erik Del Bufalo - 2005 - Eidos: Revista de Filosofía de la Universidad Del Norte 3:132-140.
    Recientemente ha muerto Jacques Derrida. Nos deja su obra y nos deja con un nombre que es más que su obra. Su nombre que, como todo nombre, es el nombre de alguien. Este texto trata de mostrar que el propio nombre de Derrida, ahora un alguien más allá de la vida, es también otra imposibilidad de la ontología y otra desconstrucción de la pretensión del juego metafísico de la presencia y su representación. Tratamos de mostrar aquí cómo este alguien ausente (...)
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  31. Eyes of the University: Right to Philosophy.Jacques Derrida - 2004 - Stanford University Press.
    Completing the translation of Derrida’s monumental work Right to Philosophy (the first part of which has already appeared under the title of Who’s Afraid of Philosophy?), Eyes of the University brings together many of the philosopher’s most important texts on the university and, more broadly, on the languages and institutions of philosophy. In addition to considerations of the implications for literature and philosophy of French becoming a state language, of Descartes’ writing of the Discourse on Method in French, and of (...)
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  32. Monolingualism of the Other: Or, the Prosthesis of Origin.Jacques Derrida - 1998 - Stanford University Press.
    " This book intertwines theoretical reflection with historical and cultural particularity to enunciate, then analyze this conundrum in terms of the distinguished author's own relationship to the French language.
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  33. The Archeology of the Frivolous: Reading Condillac.Jacques Derrida - 1980 - University of Nebraska Press.
    In 1746 the French philosophe Condillac published his Essay on the Origin of Human Knowledge , one of many attempts during the century to determine how we organize and validate ideas as knowledge. In investigating language, especially written language, he found not only the seriousness he sought but also a great deal of frivolity whose relation to the sober business of philosophy had to be addressed somehow. If the mind truly reflects the world, and language reflects the mind, why is (...)
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  34. Edmund Husserl's Origin of Geometry: An Introduction.Jacques Derrida - 1978 - University of Nebraska.
    Derrida's introduction to his French translation of Husserl's essay "The Origin of Geometry," arguing that although Husserl privileges speech over writing in an account of meaning and the development of scientific knowledge, this privilege is in fact unstable.
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  35. Le retrait du métaphore.Jacques Derrida - 1977 - Analecta Husserliana 14:273-300.
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  36. Stars and Constellations: The Difference Between Gadamer and Derrida.Donatella Di Cesare - 2004 - Research in Phenomenology 34 (1):73-102.
    What is the difference between hermeneutics and deconstruction? This essay provides an answer by following the guiding thread of understanding that was already brought to the fore in Paris during the "improbable debate" between Gadamer and Derrida. Maybe there was and still is a "dialogue" between the two most important currents of continental philosophy, as Derrida suggests in his talk commemorating Gadamer at Heidelberg in 2002. It is a dialogue that passes through poetry, and above all the poems of Celan. (...)
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  37. Uwagi na temat koncepcji semantyki Jerzego Kmity.Artur Dobosz - 2012 - Filo-Sofija 12 (18).
    SOME REMARKS ON JERZY KMITA’S CONCEPT OF SEMANTICS This article presents the evolution of the concept of semantics by Jerzy Kmita. Three stages could be distinguished in his conception; the first stage is present in his two works, Szkice z teorii poznania naukowego and Z problemów epistemologii historycznej. His book Kultura i poznanie represents the second stage, and the third stage was developed in Jak słowa łączą się ze światem. “Krytyczne stadium neopragmatyzmu,” which is an article on the concept already (...)
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  38. Gadamerian Hermeneutics and Irony: Between Strauss and Derrida.Robert Dostal - 2008 - Research in Phenomenology 38 (2):247-269.
    Against the background of Gadamer's hermeneutics of trust, for which the primary concern of the hermeneutical enterprise is the matter under discussion, the Sache, this essay raises the question of Gadamer's treatment of irony. Gadamer and Gadamerians have criticized the hermeneutics of suspicion—a hermeneutics that always looks under the surface of what is said to see what is hidden. This would seem to make irony a problematic aspect of texts and discourse for a Gadamerian hermeneutics. Nowhere in Gadamer's corpus can (...)
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  39. Condillac, Essai Sur l'Origine des Connaissances Humaines, Précédé de L'archéologie du Frivole, Par Jacques Derrida. Auvers-Sur-Oise, Éditions Galilée, 1973. 301 Pages. [REVIEW]François Duchesneau - 1975 - Dialogue 14 (4):704-706.
  40. Hegel and Derrida on the Subject. [REVIEW]Andrew Dunstall - 2017 - Derrida Today 10 (2):243-251.
    A review essay on Simon Lumsden’s (UNSW) Self-Consciousness and the Critique of the Subject (Columbia University Press, 2014), assessing Lumsden’s Hegelian account of Self-Consciousness in comparison with Derrida’s in “The Pit and the Pyramid” (in Margins of Philosophy). Lumsden de-emphasises the teleology of presence in Hegel’s work, especially the Phenomenology of Spirit. Instead, he concentrates on how processes of intuition and concept for Hegel demonstrate the continued change of historical meaning. The result is an account that is very close to (...)
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  41. Badiou Versus Derrida: Truth, Sets, and Sophistry.David Fiorovanti - 2012 - Philosophical Forum 43 (1):51-64.
    This article explores the question of truth in the work of Jacques Derrida and Alain Badiou. Specifically, it investigates Badiou’s claim that deconstruction is a form of sophistry. Badiou positions himself against Derrida in preference for a philosophy committed to Truth, Being and the event. The sophist, in contrast to the philosopher, denies the existence of truths and the category of truth. Despite this hostility, Badiou argues that the two must coexist. Badiou also explores the relationship between existence and inexistence (...)
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  42. Language, Exception, Messianism: The Thematics of Agamben on Derrida.David Fiorovanti - 2010 - The Bible and Critical Theory 6 (1):5.1-5.12.
    This paper revisits Giorgio Agamben’s text The Time That Remains and through a comparative analysis contrasts the author’s reading of St Paul’s Romans to relevant Derridean thematics prevalent in the text. Specific themes include language, the law, and the subject. I illustrate how Agamben attempts to revitalise the idea of philosophical anthropology by breaking away from the deconstructive approach. Agamben argues that language is an experience but is currently in a state of nihilism. Consequently, the subject has become lost; or, (...)
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  43. Denegation, Nonduality, and Language in Derrida and Dōgen.Toby Avard Foshay - 1994 - Philosophy East and West 44 (3):543-558.
  44. The Law of Language and the Anarchy of Meaning in the Searle-Derrida Controversy.M. Frank - 1984 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 38 (151):396-421.
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  45. Hermeneutics, Deconstruction, and Linguistic Theory.Dieter Freundlieb - 1990 - Journal for General Philosophy of Science / Zeitschrift für Allgemeine Wissenschaftstheorie 21 (1):183-203.
    This paper is an exposition as well as a critical examination of M. Frank's response to the Derrida/Searle debate. It argues that Frank's critique of Derrida and Searle is partly justified but suffers from a number of shortcomings. The author agrees with Frank's argument that Derrida fails to explain how linguistic meaning is possible on the basis of purely differential relations between signs (différance) and supports his view that the human subject, in spite of its lack of complete self-transparency, is (...)
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  46. Derrida's Language-Games.Newton Garver - 1991 - Topoi 10 (2):187-198.
    In previous essays (1973, 1975, 1977) I have praised Derrida's contributions to philosophical dialogue and also insisted on their limitations. The considerations raised in this present essay do not lead me to a position that is less ambivalent. Philosophy is a particular language-game. Like any other, it has its constitutive rules; or, perhaps better: its practice has certain distinctive features by means of which we recognize philosophizing and distinguish it from other linguistic activities. None of this can be set down (...)
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  47. On Being with Others: Heidegger, Wittgenstein, Derrida.Simon Glendinning - 1998 - Routledge.
    On Being With Others is an outstanding exploration of this key philosophical question. Simon Glendinning shows how traditional positions in the philosophy of mind can do little to rebuff the accusation that in fact we have little claim to have knowledge of minds other than our own. On Being With Others sets out to refute this charge and disentangle many of the confusions in contemporary philosophy of mind and language that have led to such scepticism. Simon Glendinning explores why early (...)
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  48. Analysis of a Text and its Representations.Miriam Green - 2009 - Philosophy of Management 7 (3):27-42.
    This paper is concerned with the representation in academic journal articles and textbooks of an organisation theory. In the case of Burns’ and Stalker’s book The Management of Innovation (1961,1966), summaries of the text by other scholars have arguably differed from the original authors and among themselves in their emphases. Similar points have been made about representations of other theorists such as Kurt Lewin and, perhaps most famously, Adam Smith. They all raise issues about the meanings of texts and where (...)
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  49. No Letters: Hobbes and 20th-Century Philosophy of Language.W. P. Grundy - 2008 - Philosophy of the Social Sciences 38 (4):486-512.
    The author argues that Thomas Hobbes anticipates a set of questions about meaning and semantic order that come to fuller expression in the 20th century, in the writings of W.V.O. Quine, Ludwig Wittgenstein, Donald Davidson, Jacques Derrida, and Richard Rorty. Despite their different points of departure, these 20th-century writers pose a number of profound questions about the conditions for the stability of meaning, and about the conditions that govern the use of the term “language” itself. Though the more recent debate (...)
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  50. The Birth of Language Out of the Spirit of Improvisation.Andrew Haas - 2012 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 20 (3):331-347.
    Abstract What is the origin of language? For Levinas, from Aristotle to von Humboldt, the tradition of Western metaphysics has understood language as a representation of reality, going beyond or transcending experience. In this way, language is a metaphor that substitutes for experience?and all language is originally metaphorical. Experience however, is essentially inexpressible?for it not only transcends language, but it does so because experience is always experience of the other, of that which remains infinitely other. And language reminds us of (...)
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