This category needs an editor. We encourage you to help if you are qualified.
Volunteer, or read more about what this involves.
Related categories

26 found
Order:
  1. added 2015-02-20
    Between Dialectic, Eristic and Deconstruction : Of Socratic Methods and Higher Education in the 21st Century.Raymond Aaron Younis - 2008 - Studies in Learning, Evaluation, Innovation and Development 5 (4):51-62.
  2. added 2015-02-20
    Language Games, Postmodernism and Deconstruction.Raymond Aaron Younis - 2006 - In M. Freund M. O’Loughlin & J. Mackenzie (eds.), Politics, Business and Education: the Aims of Education in the Twenty First Century. PESA.
  3. added 2014-08-10
    Continental Philosophy of Social Science: Hermeneutics, Genealogy, Critical Theory.Yvonne Sherratt - 2006 - Cambridge University Press.
    Continental Philosophy of Social Science demonstrates the unique and autonomous nature of the continental approach to social science and contrasts it with the Anglo-American tradition. Yvonne Sherratt argues for the importance of an historical understanding of the Continental tradition in order to appreciate its individual, humanist character. Examining the key traditions of hermeneutic, genealogy, and critical theory, and the texts of major thinkers such as Gadamer, Ricoeur, Derrida, Nietzsche, Foucault, the Early Frankfurt School and Habermas, she also contextualizes contemporary developments (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  4. added 2014-08-09
    Derrida and Cavaillès: Mathematics and the Limits of Phenomenology.Michael Roubach - 2010 - International Journal of Philosophical Studies 18 (2):243-254.
    This paper examines Derrida's interpretation of Jean Cavaill s's critique of phenomenology in On Logic and the Theory of Science . Derrida's main claim is that Cavaill s's arguments, especially the argument based on G del's incompleteness theorems, need not lead to a total rejection of Husserl's phenomenology, but only its static version. Genetic phenomenology, on the other hand, not only is not undermined by Cavaill s's critique, but can even serve as a philosophical framework for Cavaill s's own position. (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  5. added 2014-08-06
    Derrida, Badiou and the Formal Imperative.Christopher Charles Norris - unknown
    In this path-breaking study Christopher Norris proposes a transformed understanding of the much-exaggerated differences between analytic and continental philosophy. While keeping the analytic tradition squarely in view, his book focuses on the work of Jacques Derrida and Alain Badiou, two of the most original and significant figures in the recent history of ideas. Norris argues that these thinkers have decisively reconfigured the terrain of contemporary philosophy and, between them, pointed a way beyond some of those seemingly intractable issues that have (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  6. added 2014-08-06
    Deconstruction, Science, and the Logic of Enquiry.Christopher Norris - 2010 - Derrida Today 3 (2):178-200.
    In this essay I set out to place Derrida's work – especially his earlier (pre-1980) books and essays – in the context of related or contrasting developments in analytic philosophy of science over the past half-century. Along the way I challenge the various misconceptions that have grown up around that work, not only amongst its routine detractors in the analytic camp but also amongst some of its less philosophically informed disciples. In particular I focus on the interlinked issues of realism (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  7. added 2014-08-06
    Fiction, Philosophy and Literary Theory: Will the Real Saul Kripke Please Stand Up?Christopher Charles Norris - unknown
    This book brings together three main topics - deconstruction, philosophy of language, and literary theory - that have figured centrally in Christopher Norris's work over the past two decades. It offers a refreshingly clear and vigorous statement of his views as to how ‘theory' might profit from a greater awareness of current philosophical debates while philosophy might likewise gain by adopting a more open-minded attitude toward developments in literary theory. Most significant here is Norris's continuing exploration of the various points (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  8. added 2014-08-06
    Language, Logic, and Epistemology: A Modal-Realist Approach.Christopher Norris - 2004 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Norris presents a series of closely linked chapters on recent developments in epistemology, philosophy of language, cognitive science, literary theory, musicology and other related fields. While to this extent adopting an interdisciplinary approach, Norris also very forcefully challenges the view that the academic "disciplines" as we know them are so many artificial constructs of recent date and with no further role than to prop up existing divisions of intellectual labour. He makes his case through some exceptionally acute revisionist readings of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  9. added 2014-08-06
    Algebras, Geometries, and Topologies of the Fold : Deleuze, Derrida, and Quasi-Mathematical Thinking (with Leibniz and Mallarmé).Arkady Plotnitsky - 2003 - In Paul Patton & John Protevi (eds.), Between Deleuze and Derrida. Continuum.
  10. added 2014-08-06
    Deconstruction, Anti–Realism and Philosophy of Science—an Interview with Christopher Norris.Christopher Norris & Marianna Papastephanou - 2002 - Journal of Philosophy of Education 36 (2):265–289.
    In this interview, Christopher Norris discusses a wide range of issues having to do with postmodernism, deconstruction and other controversial topics of debate within present-day philosophy and critical theory. More specifically he challenges the view of deconstruction as just another offshoot of the broader postmodernist trend in cultural studies and the social sciences. Norris puts the case for deconstruction as continuing the 'unfinished project of modernity' and—in particular—for Derrida's work as sustaining the values of enlightened critical reason in various spheres (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  11. added 2014-08-06
    Structure and Genesis in Scientific Theory: Husserl, Bachelard, Derrida.Christopher Norris - 2000 - British Journal for the History of Philosophy 8 (1):107 – 139.
    (2000). STRUCTURE AND GENESIS IN SCIENTIFIC THEORY: HUSSERL, BACHELARD, DERRIDA. British Journal for the History of Philosophy: Vol. 8, No. 1, pp. 107-139. doi: 10.1080/096087800360247.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  12. added 2014-08-06
    Deconstruction, Ontology, and Philosophy of Science: Derrida on Aristotle.C. Norris - 1998 - Revue Internationale de Philosophie 52 (205):411-449.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  13. added 2014-08-06
    Supplementarity and Deviant Logics: Derrida Contra Quine.C. Norris - 1998 - Philosophical Forum 29 (2):1-27.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  14. added 2014-07-16
    Derrida and Formal Logic: Formalising the Undecidable.Paul Livingston - 2010 - Derrida Today 3 (2):221-239.
    Derrida's key concepts or pseudo-concepts of différance, the trace, and the undecidable suggest analogies to some of the most significant results of formal, symbolic logic and metalogic. As early as 1970, Derrida himself pointed out an analogy between his use of ‘undecidable’ and Gödel's incompleteness theorems, which demonstrate the existence, in any sufficiently complex and consistent system, of propositions which cannot be proven or disproven (i.e., decided) within that system itself. More recently, Graham Priest has interpreted différance as an instance (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  15. added 2014-07-05
    Science and Transcendence: Westphal, Derrida, and Responsibility.Nathan Kowalsky - 2012 - Zygon 47 (1):118-139.
    Abstract. On the naive reading, “radical social constructivism” would be the result of “deconstructing” science. Science would simply be a contingent construction in accordance with social determinants. However, postmodernism does not necessarily abandon fidelity to the objects of thought. Merold Westphal's Derridean philosophy of religion emphasizes that even theology need not eliminate the transcendence of the divine other. By drawing an analogy between natural and supernatural transcendence, I argue that science is similarly called to responsibility in the encounter with that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  16. added 2014-07-05
    Original Science: Nature Deconstructing Itself.Vicki Kirby - 2010 - Derrida Today 3 (2):201-220.
    This article explores Derrida's suggestion in Of Grammatology that deconstruction might be considered a positive science. The implication here is that ‘no outside of text’ does not evoke an enclosure whose limits can't be breached, an enclosure that discovers human exceptionalism in linguistic and technological capacities. Instead, this sense of a system and its involvements (différance) is already entangled in any ‘atom’ of its expression, whereby ‘no outside of text’ can be read as ‘no outside of Nature’. The logic that (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   2 citations  
  17. added 2014-07-05
    System and Writing in the Philosophy of Jacques Derrida.Christopher Johnson - 1993 - Cambridge University Press.
    This is an important new critical analysis of Derrida's theory of writing, based on close readings of key texts. It reveals a dimension of Derrida's thinking that has been neglected in favor of those "deconstructionist" cliches favored by much recent literary criticism. Christopher Johnson highlights the special character of Derrida's philosophy that comes from his contact with contemporary natural science and with systems theory. This study casts new light on an exacting set of intellectual issues facing philosophy and critical theory (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  18. added 2014-07-04
    Schelling’s Empiricism.Michael Halley - 2007 - Idealistic Studies 37 (2):105-120.
    The viability of Schelling’s Philosophy of Identity depends on the maintenance and cultivation of a reciprocal relationship between internal and objective reality. To stay on course Schelling assiduously checked the conceptual answers he derived from subjective thought against the objective measurements of contemporary physics. As the physicists of his day came to question the materiality of light, Schelling conceptualized it as the outer limit of what the intelligence is capable of grasping intuitively. At the same time he criticized Hegel for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (4 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  19. added 2014-07-04
    Schelling’s Empiricism.Michael Halley - 2007 - Idealistic Studies 37 (2):105-120.
    The viability of Schelling’s Philosophy of Identity depends on the maintenance and cultivation of a reciprocal relationship between internal and objective reality. To stay on course Schelling assiduously checked the conceptual answers he derived from subjective thought against the objective measurements of contemporary physics. As the physicists of his day came to question the materiality of light, Schelling conceptualized it as the outer limit of what the intelligence is capable of grasping intuitively. At the same time he criticized Hegel for (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (5 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  20. added 2014-06-25
    Writing the History of the Mind: Philosophy and Science in France, 1900 to 1960s.Cristina Chimisso - unknown
    From the Series Editor's Introduction: For much of the twentieth century, French intellectual life was dominated by theoreticians and historians of mentalite. Traditionally, the study of the mind and of its limits and capabilities was the domain of philosophy, however in the first decades of the twentieth century practitioners of the emergent human and social sciences were increasingly competing with philosophers in this field: ethnologists, sociologists, psychologists and historians of science were all claiming to study 'how people think'. Scholars, including (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (2 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   5 citations  
  21. added 2014-06-23
    Meillassoux’s Speculative Philosophy of Science: Contingency and Mathematics.Fabio Gironi - 2011 - Pli 22:26-61.
    In this paper I will offer a survey of Quentin Meillassoux’s thought, focusing on what I identify as the central node of his thought, the link between mathematics and contingency. I will then proceed to question the compatibility of his principle of radical contingency with the philosophy—and the practice—of science, and I will propose a possible solution to this problem by pushing Meillassoux along the Pythagorean path. Finally, I will argue that 1) his project of evacuating metaphysical necessity via a (...)
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   1 citation  
  22. added 2014-03-27
    Originary Technicity: The Theory of Technology From Marx to Derrida.Arthur Bradley - 2011 - Palgrave-Macmillan.
    Life -- Labour -- Psyche -- Being -- The other -- Time -- Death.
    Remove from this list  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  23. added 2014-03-07
    Introduction: The Meeting of Deconstruction and Science.Nicole Anderson & H. Peter Steeves - 2010 - Derrida Today 3 (2):175-177.
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark  
  24. added 2014-03-07
    Quantum Entanglements and Hauntological Relations of Inheritance: Dis/Continuities, SpaceTime Enfoldings, and Justice-to-Come.Karen Barad - 2010 - Derrida Today 3 (2):240-268.
    How much of philosophical, scientific, and political thought is caught up with the idea of continuity? What if it were otherwise? This paper experiments with the disruption of continuity. The reader is invited to participate in a performance of spacetime (re)configurings that are more akin to how electrons experience the world than any journey narrated though rhetorical forms that presume actors move along trajectories across a stage of spacetime (often called history). The electron is here invoked as our host, an (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   4 citations  
  25. added 2014-03-05
    Epimetheus Bound: Stiegler on Derrida, Life, and the Technological Condition.Tracy Colony - 2011 - Research in Phenomenology 41 (1):72-89.
    Bernard Stiegler's account of technology as constitutive of the human as such is without precedent. However, Stiegler's work must also be understood in terms of its explicit appropriations from the thought of Jacques Derrida. An important, yet overlooked, context for framing Stiegler's relation to Derrida is the question of nonhuman life thought in terms of différance . As I argue, Stiegler's account does not unfold the most profound implications of Derrida's understanding of nonhuman life as différance . While Stiegler describes (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (6 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark   3 citations  
  26. added 2013-08-20
    Disclosure and Inscription: Heidegger, Derrida, and the Technological Difference.Tom Paul Barker - unknown
    The relationship of Jacques Derrida and Martin Heidegger has always been complex, encompassing an entanglement of two already immense networks and suspended between proximities and distances from infinitesimal to radical. Its peculiarity is evident in the way in which Derrida strategically inscribes his own text at the margin of Heidegger's thought via a double or cl6tural gesture which articulates the paradox that Derrida writes with Heidegger against Heidegger. One of the most decisive aspects of this gesture is Derrida's deconstruction of (...)
    Remove from this list   Direct download (3 more)  
     
    Export citation  
     
    Bookmark