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  1. Is Forgiveness a Good Thing?Maria Magoula Adamos - 2012 - Forgiveness: Promise, Possibility and Failure.
    While most scholars focus on the advantages of forgiveness, the negative effects of hasty forgiveness have been largely neglected in the literature. In this essay I shall argue that in certain contexts granting forgiveness to a wrongdoer could be morally questionable, and sometimes it could even be morally wrong. Following Aristotle’s view of emotion, and, in particular, his notion of virtuous anger, I shall claim that appropriate, righteous anger is instrumental for justice, and, as a result, inappropriate, or imprudent forgiveness (...)
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  2. What Do We Mean by 'Forgiveness?': Some Answers From the Ancient Greeks.Maria Magoula Adamos & Julia B. Griffin - 2013 - Forgiveness:Philosophy, Psychology, and the Arts.
    There seems to be confusion and disagreement among scholars about the meaning of interpersonal forgiveness. In this essay we shall venture to clarify the meaning of forgiveness by examining various literary works. In particular, we shall discuss instances of forgiveness from Homer’s The Iliad, Euripides’ Hippolytus, and Aristotle’s Nicomachean Ethics and we shall focus on the changes that the concept of forgiveness has gone through throughout the centuries, in the hope of being able to understand, and therefore, of being able (...)
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  3. Luckless Desert is Different Desert.Jonathan E. Adler - 1987 - Mind 96 (382):247-249.
  4. Justice, Claims and Prioritarianism: Room for Desert?Matthew Adler - manuscript
    Does individual desert matter for distributive justice? Is it relevant, for purposes of justice, that the pattern of distribution of justice’s “currency” (be it well-being, resources, preference-satisfaction, capabilities, or something else) is aligned in one or another way with the pattern of individual desert? -/- This paper examines the nexus between desert and distributive justice through the lens of individual claims. The concept of claims (specifically “claims across outcomes”) is a fruitful way to flesh out the content of distributive justice (...)
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  5. A Review of "Disability & Justice: The Capabilities Approach in Practice", by Christopher A. Riddle. [REVIEW]Alexander Agnello - 2014 - Dialogue 7:1-3.
  6. A Buffet of Deserts: An Examination of the Underlying Principles of Desert in Job.Zachary Alexander - 2009 - Kairos: Evangelical Journal of Theology 3 (1):23-34.
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  7. Desert and the Control Asymmetry.David Alm - 2010 - Ethical Theory and Moral Practice 13 (4):361 - 375.
    According to what we could call the "liberal" theory of distributive justice, people do not deserve the money they are able to make in the market for contributing to the economy. Yet the standard arguments for that view, which center on the fact that persons have very limited control over the size of their contributions, would also seem to imply that persons cannot deserve admiration, appreciation, esteem, praise and so on for these and other contributions. The control asymmetry is this: (...)
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  8. Critiquing The Veil Of Ignorance.John Altmann - manuscript
    The present work is to be a critique of Rawls’ Veil of Ignorance as well as putting forth an alternative analytical tool when constructing societies known as the L’echelle Naturelle. My paper hopes to argue that inequalities in a society are not only essential in society contrary to Rawls’ Egalitarian ideology, but do in fact contain equality so long as the autonomy of the citizen is fully exercisable. I contend that institutions such as government and their extensions namely the law, (...)
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  9. Being Lucky and Being Deserving, and Distribution.Anthony Amatrudo - 2010 - Heythrop Journal 51 (4):658-669.
    This paper examines the concepts of desert and luck, familiar in political theory but neglected by sociologists. I argue that the idea of desert is composed of both personal performance and the degree of responsibility a person has over that performance. Distribution ought to be in accordance with the indebtedness created by the person's performance. This can be compromised by luck; that is, personal desert is undermined where lack of performance scuttles the applicability of the contributory model. This paper examines (...)
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  10. Desert and Equality.Richard J. Arneson - 2007 - In Nils Holtug & Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (eds.), Egalitarianism: New Essays on the Nature and Value of Equality. Clarendon Press. pp. 262--293.
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  11. Institutions and the Normativity of Desert.Sorin Baiasu - 2007 - Contemporary Political Theory 6 (2):175-195.
    The question of whether desert depends on institutions or institutions on desert continues to divide politicians and political theorists, particularly in disputes over the justification of the welfare state. Even though it is a significant question with direct relevance for issues of economic justice, little has been done so far to evaluate the various positions in dispute and to make explicit the concepts involved. In this paper, I first present the main senses in which the concepts of desert, dependence and (...)
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  12. Discoveries in the Judaean Desert Volume Vii.: Qumran Grotte 4: Iii.M. Baillet - 1982 - Oxford University Press UK.
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  13. From Nozick to Welfare Rights: Self‐Ownership, Property, and Moral Desert.Adrian Bardon - 2000 - Critical Review 14 (4):481-501.
    Abstract The Kantian moral foundations of Nozickian libertarianism suggest that the claim that self?ownership grounds only negative rights to property should be rejected. The moral foundations of Nozick's libertarianism better support basing property rights on moral desert. It is neither incoherent nor implausible to say that need can be a basis for desert. By implication, the libertarian contention that persons ought to be respected as persons living self?shaping lives is inconsistent with the libertarian refusal to accept that claims of need (...)
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  14. Redistribution.Christian Barry - 2011 - Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    When philosophers, social scientists, and politicians seek to determine the justice of institutional arrangements, their discussions have often taken the form of questioning whether and under what circumstances the redistribution of wealth or other valuable goods is justified. This essay examines the different ways in which redistribution can be understood, the diverse political contexts in which it has been employed, and whether or not it is a useful concept for exploring questions of distributive justice.
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  15. Young on Responsibility and Structural Injustice. [REVIEW]Christian Barry & Luara Ferracioli - 2013 - Criminal Justice Ethics 32 (3):247-257.
    Our aim in this essay is to critically examine Iris Young’s arguments in her important posthumously published book against what she calls the liability model for attributing responsibility, as well as the arguments that she marshals in support of what she calls the social connection model of political responsibility. We contend that her arguments against the liability model of conceiving responsibility are not convincing, and that her alternative to it is vulnerable to damaging objections.
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  16. Who Should Pay for the Damage of the Global Financial Crisis?Christian Barry & Matt Peterson - 2011 - In Ned Dobos Christian Barry & Thomas Pogge (eds.), Global Financial Crisis:The Ethical Issues. Palgrave.
  17. Why Remittances to Poor Countries Should Not Be Taxed.Christian Barry & Gerhard Øverland - 2010 - NYU Journal of International Law and Politics 42 (1):1180-1207.
    Remittances are private financial transfers from migrant workers back to their countries of origin. These are typically intra-household transfers from members of a family who have emigrated to those who have remained behind. The scale of such transfers throughout the world is very large, reaching $338 billion U.S. in 20081—several times the size of overseas development assistance (ODA) and larger even than foreign direct investment (FDI). The data on migration and remittances is too poor to warrant very firm conclusions about (...)
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  18. David Schmidtz, The Elements of Justice. [REVIEW]Robert Bass - 2012 - Journal of Value Inquiry 46 (2):255-257.
    From Schmidtz, one might expect a theory of justice, basically along libertarian lines. The book may surprise, though not disappoint, for that is not quite what one would find. Instead, the title is apt. Schmidtz says that there is a terrain of justice, the terrain of what people are due, and it has a certain kind of unity.
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  19. Defending the One Percent?Peter Baumann - 2014 - The Harvard Review of Philosophy 21:106-112.
    This paper discusses and criticizes Greg Mankiw's recent defense of "the one percent".
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  20. Reciprocity.Lawrence C. Becker - 1986 - Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    In one form or another, social norms governing reciprocal behavior between individuals exist in all human societies of record. Such norms are institutionalized in social, political, and legal practices; they are internalized as expectations and behavioral dispositions in individuals. But the content of those norms differs widely from society to society, individual to individual. This book gives a normative argument for a particular content for the norms of reciprocity – a particular account of the meaning of making a fitting and (...)
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  21. Property Rights: Philosophic Foundations.Lawrence C. Becker - 1977 - Routledge & Kegan Paul.
    This book begins with a distinction between a general, a specific, and a particular justification of property rights. Then after a brief review of Hohfeld's analysis of legal rights, and Honore's analysis of legal ownership, various standard general justifications are assessed: first occupancy; personality; Locke's labor theory of original acquisition; utilitarian property theory (value theory and economic versions); and accounts based on a strong principle of personal liberty.. This is followed by remarks on anti--property arguments. The book concludes with a (...)
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  22. What Do We Deserve. A Reader on Justice and Desert. Edited by Louis P. Pojman and Owen McLeod.André Berten - 2001 - Revue Philosophique De Louvain 99 (3):511-513.
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  23. Mercy and Desert.Andrew Brien - 1991 - Philosophical Papers 20 (3):193-201.
  24. Desert as a Principle of Distributive Justice A Reconsideration.Roberto Brigati - 2014 - Philosophy and Social Criticism 40 (7):705-722.
    Can desert be the foundation of justice? Recent attempts to redefine distributive justice in the light of the notions of desert and merit depend largely upon how much independent moral force can be attributed to these notions. This is why a number of theorists, following in Joel Feinberg’s wake, assume desert to be a natural feature (of an action, or a person, or a performance), independently of the institutions that may reward it, and of the socio-political background against which it (...)
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  25. Putting Educational Equality in its Place.Harry Brighouse & Adam Swift - 2008 - Educational Policy and Finance 3 (4):444-466.
  26. Global Distributive Justice, Entitlement, and Desert.Gillian Brock - 2005 - Canadian Journal of Philosophy 35 (sup1):109-138.
  27. Current Controversies in Political Philosophy.Thom Brooks (ed.) - 2015 - Routledge.
    Current Controversies in Political Philosophy brings together an international team of leading philosophers to explore and debate four key and dynamic issues in the field in an accessible way. Should we all be cosmopolitans? – Gillian Brock and Cara Nine Are rights important? – Rowan Cruft and Sonu Bedi Is sexual objectification wrong and, if so, why? – Lina Papadaki and Scott Anderson What to do about climate change? – Alexa Zellentin and Thom Brooks These questions are the focus of (...)
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  28. Punishment.Thom Brooks - 2012 - Routledge.
    Punishment is a topic of increasing importance for citizens and policy makers. Why should we punish criminals? Which theory of punishment is most compelling? Is the death penalty ever justified? These questions and many others are addressed in this highly engaging guide. Punishment is a critical introduction to the philosophy of punishment offering a new and refreshing approach that will benefit readers of all backgrounds and interests. This is the first critical guide to examine all leading contemporary theories of punishment, (...)
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  29. Shame on You, Shame on Me? Nussbaum on Shame Punishment.Thom Brooks - 2008 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 25 (4):322-334.
    abstract Shame punishments have become an increasingly popular alternative to traditional punishments, often taking the form of convicted criminals holding signs or sweeping streets with a toothbrush. In her Hiding from Humanity, Martha Nussbaum argues against the use of shame punishments because they contribute to an offender's loss of dignity. However, these concerns are shared already by the courts which also have concerns about the possibility that shaming might damage an offender's dignity. This situation has not led the courts to (...)
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  30. Serena Olsaretti , Desert and Justice , Pp. Xi + 269.Kimberley Brownlee - 2006 - Utilitas 18 (4):449.
  31. Desert Channels: The Impulse to Conserve.Jane Carruthers - 2011 - Transactions of the Royal Society of South Africa 66 (1):54-55.
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  32. Pasolini in the Desert.Cesare casarino - 2004 - Angelaki 9 (1):97 – 102.
  33. Desert.Peter Celello - 2014 - Internet Encyclopedia of Philosophy.
    Desert Desert is a normative concept that is used in day-to-day life. Many believe that being treated as one deserves to be treated is a matter of justice, fairness, or rightness. Although desert claims come in a variety of forms, generally they are claims about some positive or negative treatment that someone or something ought […].
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  34. Against Desert as a Forward-Looking Concept.Peter Celello - 2009 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 26 (2):144-159.
    Fred Feldman and, more recently, David Schmidtz have challenged the standard view that a person's desert is based strictly on past and present facts about him. I argue that Feldman's attempt to overturn this 'received wisdom' about desert's temporal orientation is unsuccessful, since his examples do not establish that what a person deserves now can be based on what will occur in the future. In addition, his forward-looking account introduces an unnecessary asymmetry regarding desert's temporal orientation in different contexts. Schmidtz (...)
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  35. Jambhoji Messiah of the Thar Desert.M. S. Chandla - 1998 - Aurva Publications.
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  36. EQUALITY, COMMUNITY, AND THE SCOPE OF DISTRIBUTIVE JUSTICE: A PARTIAL DEFENSE OF COHEN's VISION.Dong-Ryul Choo - 2014 - Socialist Studies 10 (1):152-173.
    Luck egalitarians equalize the outcome enjoyed by people who exemplify the same degree of distributive desert by removing the influence of luck. They also try to calibrate differential rewards according to the pattern of distributive desert. This entails that they have to decide upon, among other things, the rate of reward, i.e., a principled way of distributing rewards to groups exercising different degrees of the relevant desert. However, the problem of the choice of reward principle is a relatively and undeservedly (...)
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  37. Is Desert in the Details?Christopher Freiman Shaun Nichols - 2011 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 82 (1):121-133.
  38. “Inhospitable Desert”: Inhabiting the Inn in Early Modern Spanish Theater.Noelia Cirnigliaro - 2011 - Mediaevalia 32 (1):197-220.
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  39. The So-Called Fertile Crescent and Desert Bay.Albert Clay - 1924 - Journal of the American Oriental Society 44:186-201.
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  40. Breasts, Bodies, Canvas: Central Desert Art as Experience. [REVIEW]Elizabeth Coleman - 2008 - Colloquy 15:259-266.
  41. Jennifer Loureide Biddle. Breasts, Bodies, Canvas : Central Desert Art as Experience.Elizabeth Coleman - unknown
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  42. The Architect and the Ditch Digger.Cruz Cora - manuscript
    “You have an architect and a ditch-digger working together on a construction project. Who gets paid more, and why?” Does a tendency toward abstraction and quantification, a pretense of objectivity, obscure the character, situation and bias from which all economic and political theorems stem? Following the principle that arguments neither arise nor persist in a vacuum, that they live and die by their context and character, we can describe two sorts of response corresponding to two rather timeless worldviews, along with (...)
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  43. Badain Jaran: The Forgotten Desert.Carlos Crespo - 2013 - Scheidegger & Spiess.
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  44. Moral Agents and Political Spectators. On Some Virtues and Vices of Rawls’s Liberalism.Giovanni De Grandis - 2007 - Politics and Ethics Review 2 (3):217-235.
    The paper defends the theoretical strength and consistency of Rawls's constructivism, showing its ability to articulate and convincingly weave together several key ethical ideas; yet it questions the political relevance of this admirable normative architecture. After having illustrated Rawls's conception of moral agency and practical reason, the paper tackles two criticisms raised by Scheffler. First the allegation of naturalism based on Rawls's disdain of common sense ideas on desert is rebutted. It is then shown that, contrary to Scheffler's contention, Rawls (...)
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  45. Discoveries in the Judaean Desert Volume Vi. Qumran Grotte 4: Ii.R. de Vaux & J. T. Milik - 1977 - Oxford University Press UK.
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  46. The Mediterranean Was a Desert: A Voyage of the Glomar ChallengerKenneth J. Hsü.Margaret B. Deacon - 1989 - Isis 80 (2):343-343.
  47. Choices, Consequences and Desert.Teun J. Dekker - 2009 - Inquiry : An Interdisciplinary Journal of Philosophy 52 (2):109 – 126.
    It is a commonly held position in the literature on distributive justice that choices individuals make from an equalized background may lead to inequalities of outcome. This raises the question of how to assign consequences to particular types of behaviour. Theories of justice based on the concept of moral responsibility offer considerable guidance as to how society should be structured, but they rarely address the question of what the consequences of making a particular choice should be. To fill this lacuna, (...)
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  48. New Cairo. Photos of an Emerging Gated City in the Desert.Manuel Alvarez Diestro - 2013 - Topos: European Landscape Magazine 82:49.
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  49. An Amethyst Mine in Egypt's Eastern Desert.Wadi Abu Diyeiba - 2004 - Minerva 15 (6):12-14.
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  50. OKIN's FEMINIST CHALLENGE TO RAWLS's THEORY OF JUSTICE. FROM THEORY TO PUBLIC ACTION.Alexandra Dobra - 2011 - Studia Philosophica (1):51-64.
    The present paper aims to analyze Okin’s critique of Rawls’s theory of justice via a held argumentative dialogue. This critique is centred on Rawls’s dichotomy between public and private sphere, and its commitment to a purely political liberalism, both hindering the application of justice within the family. Hence, gender inequality is not inhibited at its origin, at the level of the patriarchal family. In order to achieve this inhibition, Okin aspires to use Rawls’s theory of justice as an epitome in (...)
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