Disability

Edited by Jami L. Anderson (University of Michigan - Flint)
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  1. Ideals of Respect: Identity, Dignity and Disability.Adam Cureton - 2020 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), Ethics in Practice: An Anthology (5th Edition). Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 454-464.
    My aim in this essay is to partially characterize an ideal kind of respectful attitude that we should aspire to have towards all people and to explain why some of the ways we often regard and treat those with disabilities may be incompatible with realizing this ideal. My proposal is roughly that that one kind of respect, which I call ‘identity respect’, is directed at the identity or self-conception of persons; that this kind of respect involves regarding the identity of (...)
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  2. Hiding a Disability and Passing as Non-Disabled.Adam Cureton - 2018 - In Adam Cureton & Jr Hill (eds.), Disability in Practice: Attitudes, Policies and Relationships. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 18-32.
    I draw on my experiences of passing as non-disabled to explain how a disabled person can hide his disability, why he might do so, and what costs and risks he and others might face along the way. Passing as non-disabled can bring greater social acceptance and inclusion in joint-projects, an enhanced sense of belonging, pride and of self-worth, and an easier time forming and maintaining personal relationships. Yet hiding one’s disability can also undermine some of these same values when doing (...)
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  3. Jo Campling Essay Prize, Postgraduate Winner, 2019Whose Knowledge Counts? Rewriting the Literature Review to Include Marginalised Voices.Francesca Ribenfors - forthcoming - Ethics and Social Welfare:1-8.
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  4. Disabled Lives in Deliberative Systems.Afsoun Afsahi - forthcoming - Political Theory:009059172091309.
    This essay argues that the systemic turn in deliberative democracy has opened up avenues to think about disabled citizenship within discursive processes. I highlight the systemic turn’s recognition of the interdependence of individuals and institutions upon each other in a system as key to this project. This recognition has led to three transformations: a more generous account of deliberative speech acts and behaviors; recognition of the role of enclaves; and incorporating the role of discursive representatives. These changes normalize the participation (...)
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  5. The minority body: A theory of disability.Margrit Shildrick - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (1):82-85.
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  6. Diderot’s Letter on the Blind as Disability Political Theory.Nancy J. Hirschmann - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (1):84-108.
    This essay considers Denis Diderot’s Letter on the Blind for the Use of Those Who Can See as a work that can contribute to a disability political theory. By recounting the experiences of visually impaired persons in their own words, Diderot opens up possibilities for a disability politics of self-representation, maintaining that sighted persons should listen to blind persons’ accounts of their own experience rather than relying on their own imaginings and assumptions. By using blind experiences to challenge a philosophical (...)
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  7. The Harm of Ableism: Medical Error and Epistemic Injustice.David M. Peña-Guzmán & Joel Michael Reynolds - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 29 (3):205-242.
    This paper argues that epistemic errors rooted in group- or identity- based biases, especially those pertaining to disability, are undertheorized in the literature on medical error. After sketching dominant taxonomies of medical error, we turn to the field of social epistemology to understand the role that epistemic schemas play in contributing to medical errors that disproportionately affect patients from marginalized social groups. We examine the effects of this unequal distribution through a detailed case study of ableism. There are four primary (...)
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  8. Killing in the Name of Care.Joel Michael Reynolds - 2018 - Levinas Studies 12:141-164.
    On 26 July 2016, Satoshi Uematsu murdered 19 and injured 26 at a caregiving facility in Sagamihara, Japan, making it the country’s worst mass killing since WWII. In this article, I offer an analysis of the Sagamihara 19 massacre. I draw on the work of Julia Kristeva and Emmanuel Levinas to argue that claims about disability experience are insufficient to justify normative projects. In short, disability is normatively ambiguous.
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  9. Being Disabled and Disability Theology.Pia Matthews - 2019 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 16 (2):295-317.
  10. Evidence Amalgamation, Plausibility, and Cancer Research.Marta Bertolaso & Fabio Sterpetti - 2019 - Synthese 196 (8):3279-3317.
    Cancer research is experiencing ‘paradigm instability’, since there are two rival theories of carcinogenesis which confront themselves, namely the somatic mutation theory and the tissue organization field theory. Despite this theoretical uncertainty, a huge quantity of data is available thanks to the improvement of genome sequencing techniques. Some authors think that the development of new statistical tools will be able to overcome the lack of a shared theoretical perspective on cancer by amalgamating as many data as possible. We think instead (...)
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  11. The Rights Approach to Mental Illness.Tom Campbell - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 18:221-253.
    The concept of rights is now so dominant in the language of politics that it is becoming difficult to identify its use with any particular approach to the solution of social problems or to gain a clear picture of its significance, its advantages and its disadvantages as a way of conceptualizing and resolving contentious political issues. None the less there is a perceptible shift towards an emphasis on rights in contemporary politics which many welcome and encourage and others question and (...)
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  12. Replies.Martha Nussbaum - 2006 - The Journal of Ethics 10 (4):463-506.
    John Fischer challenges me to defend my arguments regarding the badness of death; I sharpen my position, but make some concessions, discussing the possibility of postmortem harm. In response to John Deigh, I defend the account of disgust given in Hiding from Humanity, together with the research of Paul Rozin that I follow there, I discuss Patrick Devlin's conservative position, agree that we need to object to its emphasis on solidarity, not only to its emphasis on disgust, and argue that (...)
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  13. Rawlsian Social-Contract Theory and the Severely Disabled.Henry S. Richardson - 2006 - Journal of Ethics 10 (4):419-462.
    Martha Nussbaum has powerfully argued in Frontiers ofJustice and elsewhere that John Rawls’s sort of social-contract theory cannot usefully be deployed to deal with issues pertaining to justice for the disabled. To counter this claim, this article deploys Rawls’s sort of social-contract theory in order to deal with issues pertaining to justice for the disabled—or, since, as Nussbaum stresses, we all have some degree of disability—for the severely disabled. In this way, rather than questioning one by one Nussbaum’s interpretive claims (...)
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  14. What is a Psychiatric Disability?Abraham Rudnick - 2014 - Health Care Analysis 22 (2):105-113.
    This article aims to clarify the notion of a psychiatric disability. The article uses conceptual analysis, examining and applying established definitions of (general) disability to psychiatric disabilities. This analysis reveals that disability as inability to perform according to expectations or norms is related to impairment as deviation from the (statistical) norm, while disability as inability to achieve (personal) goals is related to impairment as deviation from the (personal) ideal. These two views of impairment and disability are distinct from the self-organization (...)
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  15. Disability, Depression, Diagnosis, and Harm: Reflections on Two Personal Scenarios.G. Thomas Couser - 2019 - Journal of Medical Humanities 40 (2):239-251.
    In this article I draw on two scenarios from my personal life—the diagnosis of my newborn grandnephew with CHARGE syndrome and the diagnosis of my father with depression—to reflect on whether and when diagnosis may be harmful to patients. Despite the great differences between the two scenarios, I argue that in both cases the tendency of diagnosis to generalize, categorize, and stigmatize can lead to insidious and counterproductive effects. The perspective of disability studies can help physicians to anticipate, minimize or (...)
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  16. UnMuted: Conversations on Prejudice, Oppression, and Social Justice.Myisha Cherry - 2019 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Why do people hate one another? Who gets to speak for whom? Why do so many people combat prejudice based on their race, sexual orientation, or disability? What does segregation look like today? Many of us ponder and discuss urgent questions such as these at home, and see them debated in the media, the classroom, and our social media feeds, but many of us don't have access to the important new ways philosophers are thinking about these very issues. Enter UnMute, (...)
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  17. You Didn't Build That: Equality and Productivity in a Complex Society.Sean Aas - 2019 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 98 (1):69-88.
    This paper argues for Serious Distributive Egalitarianism – the view that some material inequalities are seriously objectionable as such; not merely, say, because such inequalities tend to generate inequalities in status. Social justice requires equality, I argue, because basic social institutions produce important goods and are produced in turn by the relevantly equal contributions of all those that comply with them. E.g., basic social institutions make it much easier to produce cooperatively than it would be in their absence; therefore, these (...)
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  18. Book Review: Mental Disorder, Work Disability, and the Law. [REVIEW]Michael L. Perlin - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (4):310-313.
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  19. Philosophy of Dance and Disability.Joshua M. Hall - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (12):e12551.
    The emerging field of the philosophy of dance, as suggested by Aili Bresnahan, increasingly recognizes the problem that (especially pre‐modern) dance has historically focused on bodily perfection, which privileges abled bodies as those that can best make and perform dance as art. One might expect that the philosophy of dance, given the critical and analytical powers of philosophy, might be helpful in illuminating and suggesting ameliorations for this tendency in dance. But this is particularly a difficult task since the analytic (...)
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  20. The Media Role in Building the Disability Community.Jack A. Nelson - 2000 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 15 (3):180-193.
    It is obvious that technology is rapidly changing the world around us. Nowhere is that change more evident than in the revolution occurring for those with physical and mental limitations-their portrayal in the media, their use of the media to achieve group aims and their use of the new on-line media to communicate with others who have limitations and the non-disabled world. In a very real way the growing sense of community among those with disabilities has been linked to the (...)
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  21. Empirical Support for the United States Supreme Court's Protection of the Psychotherapist-Patient Privilege.Jennifer Evans Marsh - 2003 - Ethics and Behavior 13 (4):385-400.
    This study explored relations between willingness to disclose in 5 psychotherapy scenarios and 2 independent variables. Scenarios involved suicidal, gravely disabled, physically abusive, and sexually abusive patients, and a police officer patient who shot a suspect. For each of the 5 scenarios, participants in the privilege condition had significantly higher willingness-to-disclose scores than participants in the no-privilege condition. There were no significant differences between willingness-to-disclose scores of participants with and without therapy experience; neither was there a significant interaction between privilege (...)
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  22. Conceptualising Person-Centered Advance Care Planning for People with Intellectual Disabilities: A Multifaceted Theoretical Approach.Jacqueline M. McGinley & Victoria Knoke - 2018 - Ethics and Social Welfare 12 (3):244-258.
  23. When Caring Is Just and Justice is Caring: Justice and Mental Retardation.Eva Feder Kittay - 2001 - Public Culture 13 (3):557-580.
    Among the various human forms alluded to in the Hebrew prayer, mental retardation appears to be one of the most difficult to celebrate. It is the disability that other disabled persons do not want attributed to them. It is the disability for which prospective parents are most likely to use selective abortion (Wertz 2000). And it is the disability that prompted one of the most illustrious United States Supreme Court Justices to endorse forced sterilization, because "three generations of imbeciles are (...)
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  24. Renewing Medicine’s Basic Concepts: On Ambiguity.Joel Michael Reynolds - 2018 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 13 (1):8.
    In this paper, I argue that the concept of normality in medical research and clinical practice is inextricable from the concept of ambiguity. I make this argument in the context of Edmund Pellegrino's call for a renewed reflection on medicine’s basic concepts and by drawing on work in critical disability studies concerning Deafness and body integrity identity disorder. If medical practitioners and philosophers of medicine wish to improve their understanding of the meaning of medicine as well as its concrete practice, (...)
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  25. Disability, Disease, and Health Sufficiency.Sean Aas - 2016 - In Carina Fourie & Annette Rid (eds.), What is Enough?: Sufficiency, Justice, and Health. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This chapter argues that standard accounts of health are ill-suited to constructing a plausible theory of health justice, particularly a sufficientarian theory. The problem in these accounts is revealed by their treatment of disability. Theorists of health justice need to define “health” more narrowly to capture the legitimate claims of people with disabilities. Following Ronald Amundson and Peter Hucklenbroich, this chapter proposes such a definition. Health, as defined in this chapter, is the absence of conditions that directly cause, or threaten (...)
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  26. Discrimination and Disability.Sean Aas & David Wasserman - 2017 - In Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Ethics of Discrimination. New York: Routledge.
  27. Interdependency: The Fourth Existential Insult to Humanity.Tom Malleson - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory 17 (2):160-186.
    Sigmund Freud famously described three existential insults to humanity stemming from heliocentrism, evolution, and psychoanalysis. In recent years we are, perhaps, beginning to see the emergence of a fourth: interdependency. Over the last several centuries, Anglo-American culture has modelled itself on a vision of the independent individual – strong, autonomous, and self-sufficient. Yet from feminist theory, communitarianism, disability theory, institutionalist economics, and elsewhere, the evidence mounts that independence is, in most contexts, a myth. We are, in fact, fundamentally social beings: (...)
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  28. Mental Illness Stigma and Epistemic Credibility in Advance.Abigail Gosselin - forthcoming - Social Philosophy Today.
  29. Special Supplement: The Disability Rights Critique of Prenatal Genetic Testing Reflections and Recommendations.Erik Parens & Adrienne Asch - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (5):S1.
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  30. Women and Disability. [REVIEW]Robin Tolmach Lakoff - 1989 - Feminist Studies 15 (2):365.
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  31. At Law: International Human Rights Law and Mental Disability.Lawrence O. Gostin - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (2):11.
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  32. Book ReviewsMartha C Nussbaum,. Frontiers of Justice: Disability, Nationality, Species Membership.Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, Belknap Press, 2006. Pp. 487. $35.00 ; $18.95. [REVIEW]Margaret Urban Walker - 2008 - Ethics 118 (4):742-746.
  33. Book ReviewsJonathan Glover,. Choosing Children: Genes, Disability, and Design. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2006. Pp. 121. $17.95. [REVIEW]Marc Workman - 2007 - Ethics 118 (1):155-160.
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  34. Using Codes of Ethics for Disabled Children Who Communicate Non-Verbally – Some Challenges and Implications for Social Workers.Malcolm Carey & Katherine Anne Prynallt-Jones - 2018 - Ethics and Social Welfare 12 (1):78-83.
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  35. From the Crooked Timber of Humanity, Beautiful Things Should Be Made!Anita Silvers - 2011 - APA Newsletter on Philosophy and Medicine 10 (2):1-5.
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  36. Paying for Sex—Only for People with Disabilities?Brian D. Earp & Ole Martin Moen - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (1):54-56.
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  37. Is Disability Mere Difference?Greg Bognar - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (1):46-49.
    Some philosophers and disability advocates argue that disability is not bad for you. Rather than treated as a harm, it should be considered and even celebrated as just another manifestation of human diversity. Disability is mere difference. To most of us, these are extraordinary claims. Can they be defended?
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  38. Enhancement, Disability and the Riddle of the Relevant Circumstances.Hazem Zohny - 2016 - Journal of Medical Ethics 42 (9).
    The welfarist account of enhancement and disability holds enhanced and disabled states on a spectrum: the former are biological or psychological states that increase the chances of a person leading a good life in the relevant set of circumstances, while the latter decrease those chances. Here, I focus on a particular issue raised by this account: what should we count as part of an individual’s relevant set of circumstances when thinking about enhanced and disabled states? Specifically, is social prejudice relevant (...)
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  39. Disabled People’s Independent Living Movement in Scotland: A Time for Reflection.Jim Elder-Woodward - 2016 - Ethics and Social Welfare 10 (3):252-266.
  40. Whole or Incomplete: The Myth of Body Perfection.Abha Khetarpal - 2017 - Research and Humanities in Medical Education 4:54-57.
    The media’s and society’s prejudice in favor of ‘ablesim’ propagates the myth of body perfection. As a result we pursue perfection – the concept of ableism invades our minds as well as our culture and we all succumb to it’s lure. Disability is socially constructed; it is ableism that compels people to believe that perfection is normal. This belief is nothing less than social oppression. Even the rehabilitation therapies send out strong signals that persons with disabilities are ‘deficient’ and ‘abnormal’, (...)
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  41. This Nigger's Broken: Hyper‐Masculinity, the Buck, and the Role of Physical Disability in White Anxiety Toward the Black Male Body.Tommy J. Curry - 2017 - Journal of Social Philosophy 48 (3):321-343.
  42. Parents with Disabilities.Adam Cureton - 2017 - In Leslie Francis (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of Reproductive Ethics. New York: Oxford University Press. pp. 407-427.
    Having and raising children is widely regarded as one of the most valuable projects a person can choose to undertake. Yet many disabled people find it difficult to share in this value because of obstacles that arise from widespread social attitudes about disability. A common assumption is that having a disability tends to make someone unfit to parent. This assumption may seem especially relevant as a factor in decisions about whether to allow, encourage and assist disabled people to reproduce and (...)
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  43. The Right-to-Die Exception: How the Discourse of Individual Rights Impoverishes Bioethical Discussions of Disability and What We Can Do About It.Margaret P. Wardlaw - 2010 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):43-62.
    "Tell the health professionals why people with disabilities get depressed and suicidal. Tell them about institutions. Let them know the real reasons people with disabilities give up."The disability studies perspective has been consistently marginalized in twentieth-century American bioethical discourse. Like Ralph Ellison's nameless protagonist who is "invisible … simply because people refuse to see me" (Ellison 1995, 3), both disabled people and disability studies perspectives have been conspicuously absent from mainstream contemporary bioethical inquiries. Considerations of provision, accommodation, and institutionalization have (...)
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  44. Hidden Labor: Disabled/Nondisabled Encounters, Agency, and Autonomy.Jackie Leach Scully - 2010 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):25-42.
    When I used to walk all the time, and especially before I started using a stick, I found most people acted at best as if I was not there, and at worst as if I was a drunk who deserved all I got.… [They] found it particularly hard to deal with my speech impairment, especially if they met me when I was sitting down, and hence had no prior warning … they would go red, look away or sometimes even walk (...)
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  45. Infertility in the Developing World: The Combined Role for Feminists and Disability Rights Proponents.Kavita Shah & Frances Batzer - 2010 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):109-125.
    Many of the millions of women in the developed world who experience infertility have difficulty coping with its psychological and social consequences, as well as attaining a resolution to these potentially devastating effects. Nevertheless, these women enjoy a relative benefit vis-à-vis infertile women in the developing world insofar as they live in a society that does not force them out of their own houses, curse at them in the streets, or condemn them to a life of poverty and destitution due (...)
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  46. Illness, Disease and Sin: The Connection Between Genetics and Spirituality.Matthias Beck - 2007 - Christian Bioethics 13 (1):67-89.
    The New Testament, while rejecting any superficial connection between illness and sin, does not reject a possible connection between illness and a person's relationship with God. An example can be seen in the story of the young blind man who was healed (St. John 9:3). His blindness does not result from any fault he or his parents had committed but apparently from God's wish to reveal his own healing power. The inner blindness of the Pharisees is a different type of (...)
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  47. The Matter of Disability.David T. Mitchell & Sharon L. Snyder - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (4):487-492.
    By ruling out questions of impairment from the social critique of disability, Disability Studies analyses establish a limit point in the field. Of course the setting of “limits” enables possibilities in multiple directions as well as fortifies boundaries of refusal. For instance, impairment becomes in DS simultaneously a productive refusal to interpret disabled bodies as inferior to non-disabled bodies and a bar to thinking through more active engagements with disability as materiality. Disability materiality such as conditions produced by ecological toxicities (...)
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  48. Disability and Depression.A. Cvetkovich & A. Wilkerson - 2016 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 13 (4):497-503.
    Here, Ann Cvetkovich, interviewed by Abby Wilkerson, brings Cvetkovich’s influential cultural studies analysis of depression explicitly into conversation with disability studies. Cvetkovich understands “feeling bad” as a defining affective state under neoliberalism. Drawing on a distinctive historical/cultural archive, she challenges the atomism of the neoliberal medical model that frames depression and affective distress more generally as the result of faulty brain chemistry—individual organisms gone awry. Instead, she traces these common experiences to sociopolitical phenomena ranging from current neoliberal demands for productivity (...)
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  49. Ethics: Philosophy Meets Disability.P. Louhiala - 2009 - Journal of Medical Ethics 35 (9):570-572.
    The question “what is disability” and its implications are addressed in a new book Arguing about disability: philosophical perspectives, which aims to fill the gap between disability studies and philosophy. The structure of the book has been organised roughly on the basis of three branches of philosophy: metaphysics, political philosophy and ethics. One of the main themes of the book is the characterisation of a third way of thinking about disability, a way between two extremes, the medical and social models (...)
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  50. Opening Research to Intensities: Rethinking Disability Research with Deleuze and Guattari.Daniela Mercieca & Duncan Mercieca - 2010 - Philosophy of Education 44 (1):79-92.
    This paper begins by illustrating how the social model of disability currently dominant in emancipatory disability research projects a reality ‘out there’. Drawing on John Law's writing on how statements are turned into taken-for-granted assumptions, we argue that the model of research exemplified by Colin Barnes stifles rather than enables the emancipatory understanding of disability. We explore how disability research might be otherwise conceived through Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari's concepts of series, layers and rhizomes. We suggest that by engaging (...)
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