Disability

Edited by Jami L. Anderson (University of Michigan - Flint)
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  1. A Very British Domination Contract? Charles W. Mills's Theoretical Framework and Understanding Social Justice in Britain.Zara Bain - 2021 - In Daniel Newman & Faith Gordon (eds.), Leading Works in Law and Social Justice. London:
    Chapter 3 looks at the work of Charles Mills, taking in a range of his scholarship including his most famous work – The Racial Contract – and his latest work, Black Rights, White Wrongs. Zara Bain applies Mills to consider how social justice applies in the UK. She looks at the interactions and co-constitutions of racism, classism, and ableism, and the role they play in the production of poverty. The chapter argues that Mills offers us a non-ideal contractarian analysis that (...)
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  2. Effects of Teleassistance on the Quality of Life of People With Rare Neuromuscular Diseases According to Their Degree of Disability.Oscar Martínez, Imanol Amayra, Juan Francisco López-Paz, Esther Lázaro, Patricia Caballero, Irune García, Alicia Aurora Rodríguez, Maitane García, Paula María Luna, Paula Pérez-Núñez, Jaume Barrera, Nicole Passi, Sarah Berrocoso, Manuel Pérez & Mohammad Al-Rashaida - 2021 - Frontiers in Psychology 12.
    Rare neuromuscular diseases are a group of pathologies characterized by a progressive loss of muscular strength, atrophy, fatigue, and other muscle-related symptoms, which affect quality of life levels. The low prevalence, high geographical dispersion and disability of these individuals involve difficulties in accessing health and social care services. Teleassistance is presented as a useful tool to perform psychosocial interventions in these situations. The main aim of this research is to assess the effects of a teleassistance psychosocial program on the QoL (...)
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  3. "Taking the ‘Dis’ Out of ‘Disability’: Martyrs, Mothers, and Mystics in the Middle Ages".Christina VanDyke - 2020 - In Scott Williams (ed.), Disability in Medieval Christian Philosophy and Theology. New York: pp. 203-232.
    The Middles Ages are often portrayed as a time in which people with physical disabilities in the Latin West were ostracized, on the grounds that such conditions demonstrated personal sin and/or God’s judgment. This was undoubtedly the dominant response to disability in various times and places during the fifth through fifteenth centuries, but the total range of medieval responses is much broader and more interesting. In particular, the 13th-15th century treatment of three groups (martyrs, mothers, and mystics - whose physical (...)
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  4. Children, Fetuses, and the Non-Existent: Moral Obligations and the Beginning of Life.Elizabeth Jackson - forthcoming - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy.
    The morality of abortion is a longstanding controversy. One may wonder whether it’s even possible to make significant progress on an issue over which so much ink has already been split and there is such polarizing disagreement (Boyle 1994). The papers in this issue show that this progress is possible—there is more to be said about abortion and other crucial beginning-of-life issues. They do so largely by applying contemporary philosophical tools to moral questions involving life’s beginning. The first two papers (...)
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  5. Review of Perkins (2007): Pragmatic Impairment. [REVIEW]Cristina McKean - 2010 - Pragmatics and Cognition 18 (1):196-202.
  6. Ableism and Social Epistemology.Joel Michael Reynolds & Kevin Timpe - forthcoming - In Jennifer Lackey & Aidan McGlynn (eds.), The Oxford Handbook of Social Epistemology. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This chapter canvases a number of ways that issues surrounding disability intersect with social epistemology, particularly how dominate norms concerning communication and ability can epistemically disadvantage some disabled individuals. We begin with a discussion of how social epistemology as a field and debates concerning epistemic injustice in particular fail to take the problem of ableism seriously. In section two, we analyze the concept of an individual’s “knowledge capacity,” arguing that it can easily misconstrue the extended, social nature of both knowledge (...)
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  7. Out of Plumb, Out of Key, and Out of Whack: Social Ethics and Democracy for the New Normal [Pandemic Ethics and Politics] (2021).Steven Fesmire & Heather Keith - manuscript
    for The Deweyan Task Before Us: The New Global Paradigm for Philosophy, Education, and Democracy Emerging from the Pandemic (2021 edited volume under review) John Dewey proposed soon after the atomic bombings of Hiroshima and Nagasaki that citizens of techno-industrial nations suffer from "cultural lag" (LW 15:199-200; cf. LW 4:203-28). He had in mind a sort of moral jet lag, a condition in which most of the basic alternatives we have on hand to think and talk about moral and political (...)
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  8. Disabled Lives in Deliberative Systems.Afsoun Afsahi - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (6):751-776.
    This essay argues that the systemic turn in deliberative democracy has opened up avenues to think about disabled citizenship within discursive processes. I highlight the systemic turn’s recognition of the interdependence of individuals and institutions upon each other in a system as key to this project. This recognition has led to three transformations: a more generous account of deliberative speech acts and behaviors; recognition of the role of enclaves; and incorporating the role of discursive representatives. These changes normalize the participation (...)
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  9. Rebranding Death.Angela Wentz Faulconer - 2017 - BYU Journal of Public Law 31 (2):313-332.
    In this paper, I will argue that efforts to legalize aid-in-dying or physician-assisted suicide are attempts to rebrand this sort of death as a good choice. It is common to justify physician-assisted suicide through arguments for a) relieving suffering or b) allowing individual autonomy, but I will show that the problem with these justifications is that once this type of death is judged as acceptable, it is difficult to justify limiting it to a narrow group such as the mentally competent, (...)
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  10. Dementia-Related Behaviors: A Matter of Public Health, Not Criminal Prosecution.Marshall B. Kapp - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (2):328-330.
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  11. Opioids May Be Appropriate for Chronic Pain.Paul J. Christo - 2020 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 48 (2):241-248.
    Patients living with chronic pain require appropriate access to opioid therapy along with improved access to pain care and additional therapeutic options. It's both medically reasonable and ethical to consider opioid therapy as a treatment option in the management of chronic, non-cancer pain for a subset of patients with severe pain that is unresponsive to other therapies, negatively impacts function or quality of life, and will likely outweigh the potential harms. This paper will examine opioid therapy in the setting of (...)
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  12. Ideals of Respect: Identity, Dignity and Disability.Adam Cureton - 2020 - In Hugh LaFollette (ed.), Ethics in Practice: An Anthology (5th Edition). Oxford: Wiley-Blackwell. pp. 454-464.
    My aim in this essay is to partially characterize an ideal kind of respectful attitude that we should aspire to have towards all people and to explain why some of the ways we often regard and treat those with disabilities may be incompatible with realizing this ideal. My proposal is roughly that that one kind of respect, which I call ‘identity respect’, is directed at the identity or self-conception of persons; that this kind of respect involves regarding the identity of (...)
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  13. Hiding a Disability and Passing as Non-Disabled.Adam Cureton - 2018 - In Adam Cureton & Jr Hill (eds.), Disability in Practice: Attitudes, Policies and Relationships. Oxford: Oxford University Press. pp. 18-32.
    I draw on my experiences of passing as non-disabled to explain how a disabled person can hide his disability, why he might do so, and what costs and risks he and others might face along the way. Passing as non-disabled can bring greater social acceptance and inclusion in joint-projects, an enhanced sense of belonging, pride and of self-worth, and an easier time forming and maintaining personal relationships. Yet hiding one’s disability can also undermine some of these same values when doing (...)
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  14. Jo Campling Essay Prize, Postgraduate Winner, 2019Whose Knowledge Counts? Rewriting the Literature Review to Include Marginalised Voices.Francesca Ribenfors - forthcoming - Ethics and Social Welfare:1-8.
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  15. The minority body: A theory of disability.Margrit Shildrick - 2020 - Contemporary Political Theory 19 (1):82-85.
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  16. Diderot’s Letter on the Blind as Disability Political Theory.Nancy J. Hirschmann - 2020 - Political Theory 48 (1):84-108.
    This essay considers Denis Diderot’s Letter on the Blind for the Use of Those Who Can See as a work that can contribute to a disability political theory. By recounting the experiences of visually impaired persons in their own words, Diderot opens up possibilities for a disability politics of self-representation, maintaining that sighted persons should listen to blind persons’ accounts of their own experience rather than relying on their own imaginings and assumptions. By using blind experiences to challenge a philosophical (...)
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  17. Dehumanization, Disability, and Eugenics.Robert A. Wilson - forthcoming - In Maria E. Kronfeldner (ed.), Routledge Handbook of Dehumanization. New York, NY, USA:
    This paper explores the relationship between eugenics, disability, and dehumanization, with a focus on forms of eugenics beyond Nazi eugenics.
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  18. The Harm of Ableism: Medical Error and Epistemic Injustice.David M. Peña-Guzmán & Joel Michael Reynolds - 2019 - Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal 29 (3):205-242.
    This paper argues that epistemic errors rooted in group- or identity- based biases, especially those pertaining to disability, are undertheorized in the literature on medical error. After sketching dominant taxonomies of medical error, we turn to the field of social epistemology to understand the role that epistemic schemas play in contributing to medical errors that disproportionately affect patients from marginalized social groups. We examine the effects of this unequal distribution through a detailed case study of ableism. There are four primary (...)
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  19. Killing in the Name of Care.Joel Michael Reynolds - 2018 - Levinas Studies 12:141-164.
    On 26 July 2016, Satoshi Uematsu murdered 19 and injured 26 at a caregiving facility in Sagamihara, Japan, making it the country’s worst mass killing since WWII. In this article, I offer an analysis of the Sagamihara 19 massacre. I draw on the work of Julia Kristeva and Emmanuel Levinas to argue that claims about disability experience are insufficient to justify normative projects. In short, disability is normatively ambiguous.
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  20. Liberal Neutrality and the Nonidentity Problem: The Right to Procreate Deaf Children.Cristian Puga‐Gonzalez - 2019 - Journal of Social Philosophy 50 (3):363-381.
  21. Being Disabled and Disability Theology.Pia Matthews - 2019 - Journal of Catholic Social Thought 16 (2):295-317.
    A recent report in the UK, Being Disabled in Britain: A Journey Less Equal, highlights the many inequalities, threats to dignity and discriminatory attitudes faced by disabled people. No doubt these are replicated in other countries. Using the evidenced-based findings from this report and the report’s invitation for those concerned to join the conversation on disability, this paper explores both the way in which the experiences of people with disabilities can sharpen up an understanding of Catholic social teaching and the (...)
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  22. Evidence Amalgamation, Plausibility, and Cancer Research.Marta Bertolaso & Fabio Sterpetti - 2019 - Synthese 196 (8):3279-3317.
    Cancer research is experiencing ‘paradigm instability’, since there are two rival theories of carcinogenesis which confront themselves, namely the somatic mutation theory and the tissue organization field theory. Despite this theoretical uncertainty, a huge quantity of data is available thanks to the improvement of genome sequencing techniques. Some authors think that the development of new statistical tools will be able to overcome the lack of a shared theoretical perspective on cancer by amalgamating as many data as possible. We think instead (...)
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  23. The Rights Approach to Mental Illness.Tom Campbell - 1984 - Royal Institute of Philosophy Lectures 18:221-253.
    The concept of rights is now so dominant in the language of politics that it is becoming difficult to identify its use with any particular approach to the solution of social problems or to gain a clear picture of its significance, its advantages and its disadvantages as a way of conceptualizing and resolving contentious political issues. None the less there is a perceptible shift towards an emphasis on rights in contemporary politics which many welcome and encourage and others question and (...)
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  24. Replies.Martha Nussbaum - 2006 - The Journal of Ethics 10 (4):463-506.
    John Fischer challenges me to defend my arguments regarding the badness of death; I sharpen my position, but make some concessions, discussing the possibility of postmortem harm. In response to John Deigh, I defend the account of disgust given in Hiding from Humanity, together with the research of Paul Rozin that I follow there, I discuss Patrick Devlin's conservative position, agree that we need to object to its emphasis on solidarity, not only to its emphasis on disgust, and argue that (...)
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  25. Rawlsian Social-Contract Theory and the Severely Disabled.Henry S. Richardson - 2006 - The Journal of Ethics 10 (4):419-462.
    Martha Nussbaum has powerfully argued in Frontiers ofJustice and elsewhere that John Rawls’s sort of social-contract theory cannot usefully be deployed to deal with issues pertaining to justice for the disabled. To counter this claim, this article deploys Rawls’s sort of social-contract theory in order to deal with issues pertaining to justice for the disabled—or, since, as Nussbaum stresses, we all have some degree of disability—for the severely disabled. In this way, rather than questioning one by one Nussbaum’s interpretive claims (...)
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  26. What is a Psychiatric Disability?Abraham Rudnick - 2014 - Health Care Analysis 22 (2):105-113.
    This article aims to clarify the notion of a psychiatric disability. The article uses conceptual analysis, examining and applying established definitions of (general) disability to psychiatric disabilities. This analysis reveals that disability as inability to perform according to expectations or norms is related to impairment as deviation from the (statistical) norm, while disability as inability to achieve (personal) goals is related to impairment as deviation from the (personal) ideal. These two views of impairment and disability are distinct from the self-organization (...)
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  27. Disability, Depression, Diagnosis, and Harm: Reflections on Two Personal Scenarios.G. Thomas Couser - 2019 - Journal of Medical Humanities 40 (2):239-251.
    In this article I draw on two scenarios from my personal life—the diagnosis of my newborn grandnephew with CHARGE syndrome and the diagnosis of my father with depression—to reflect on whether and when diagnosis may be harmful to patients. Despite the great differences between the two scenarios, I argue that in both cases the tendency of diagnosis to generalize, categorize, and stigmatize can lead to insidious and counterproductive effects. The perspective of disability studies can help physicians to anticipate, minimize or (...)
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  28. Specialized professional skills for the attention to the infantile disability.María Cristina Pérez Guerrero - 2019 - Humanidades Médicas 19 (1):80-96.
    RESUMEN La discapacidad que afecta a la población infantil constituye un problema emergente; diagnosticarla y tratarla de manera integral es parte del trabajo diario del profesional de Enfermería en la atención primaria de salud. Durante el estudio se identificaron carencias en las habilidades profesionales de los licenciados en Enfermería respecto a este saber. Se aplicó un entrenamiento encaminado al desarrollo de habilidades profesionales especializadas para la atención integral a la discapacidad infantil en este personal. Por ello el objetivo del presente (...)
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  29. UnMuted: Conversations on Prejudice, Oppression, and Social Justice.Myisha Cherry - 2019 - New York: Oxford University Press.
    Why do people hate one another? Who gets to speak for whom? Why do so many people combat prejudice based on their race, sexual orientation, or disability? What does segregation look like today? Many of us ponder and discuss urgent questions such as these at home, and see them debated in the media, the classroom, and our social media feeds, but many of us don't have access to the important new ways philosophers are thinking about these very issues. Enter UnMute, (...)
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  30. You Didn't Build That: Equality and Productivity in a Complex Society.Sean Aas - 2019 - Philosophy and Phenomenological Research 98 (1):69-88.
    This paper argues for Serious Distributive Egalitarianism – the view that some material inequalities are seriously objectionable as such; not merely, say, because such inequalities tend to generate inequalities in status. Social justice requires equality, I argue, because basic social institutions produce important goods and are produced in turn by the relevantly equal contributions of all those that comply with them. E.g., basic social institutions make it much easier to produce cooperatively than it would be in their absence; therefore, these (...)
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  31. Medicaid's Role for Children with Special Health Care Needs.MaryBeth Musumeci - 2018 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 46 (4):897-905.
    This commentary explores Medicaid's role for children with special health care needs today and considers how changes to Medicaid's federal financing structure under a per capita cap or block grant could affect coverage for these children.
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  32. Book Review: Mental Disorder, Work Disability, and the Law. [REVIEW]Michael L. Perlin - 1997 - Journal of Law, Medicine and Ethics 25 (4):310-313.
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  33. Kant, Emotion and Autism: Towards an Inclusive Approach to Character Education.Katy Dineen - 2018 - Ethics and Education 14 (1):1-14.
    ABSTRACTModern Kantians often address the conception of Kant as ‘cold hearted rationalist’ by arguing that there is a place, in Kantian moral theory, for the emotions. This theme of reconciling Kantianism with the emotions is concurrent with a recent interest, on the part of some Kantians, in issues pertaining to character education. This paper will argue that Kantianism has much to offer character education; in particular, inclusiveness of those who might have difficulty experiencing appropriate moral emotion. Nevertheless, I will argue (...)
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  34. Philosophy of Dance and Disability.Joshua M. Hall - 2018 - Philosophy Compass 13 (12):e12551.
    The emerging field of the philosophy of dance, as suggested by Aili Bresnahan, increasingly recognizes the problem that (especially pre‐modern) dance has historically focused on bodily perfection, which privileges abled bodies as those that can best make and perform dance as art. One might expect that the philosophy of dance, given the critical and analytical powers of philosophy, might be helpful in illuminating and suggesting ameliorations for this tendency in dance. But this is particularly a difficult task since the analytic (...)
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  35. The Media Role in Building the Disability Community.Jack A. Nelson - 2000 - Journal of Mass Media Ethics 15 (3):180-193.
    It is obvious that technology is rapidly changing the world around us. Nowhere is that change more evident than in the revolution occurring for those with physical and mental limitations-their portrayal in the media, their use of the media to achieve group aims and their use of the new on-line media to communicate with others who have limitations and the non-disabled world. In a very real way the growing sense of community among those with disabilities has been linked to the (...)
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  36. Empirical Support for the United States Supreme Court's Protection of the Psychotherapist-Patient Privilege.Jennifer Evans Marsh - 2003 - Ethics and Behavior 13 (4):385-400.
    This study explored relations between willingness to disclose in 5 psychotherapy scenarios and 2 independent variables. Scenarios involved suicidal, gravely disabled, physically abusive, and sexually abusive patients, and a police officer patient who shot a suspect. For each of the 5 scenarios, participants in the privilege condition had significantly higher willingness-to-disclose scores than participants in the no-privilege condition. There were no significant differences between willingness-to-disclose scores of participants with and without therapy experience; neither was there a significant interaction between privilege (...)
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  37. Conceptualising Person-Centered Advance Care Planning for People with Intellectual Disabilities: A Multifaceted Theoretical Approach.Jacqueline M. McGinley & Victoria Knoke - 2018 - Ethics and Social Welfare 12 (3):244-258.
  38. Considering the Role Marked Variation Plays in Classifying Humans: A Normative Approach.Catherine Kendig - 2018 - Philosophy, Theory, and Practice in Biology 13 (10):1-15.
    The purpose of this paper is to contribute to the ongoing analyses that aim to confront the problem of marked variation. Negatively marked differences are those natural variations that are used to cleave human beings into different categories (e.g., of disablement, of medicalized pathology, of subnormalcy, or of deviance). The problem of marked variation is: Why are some rather than other variations marked as epistemically or culturally significant or as a diagnostic of pathology, and What is the epistemic background that (...)
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  39. A Case for Greater Risk Tolerance in Internet Use by Adults with Intellectual Disabilities: A Comment on Chalghoumi Et Al.David Wasserman - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):223-226.
    This comment argues for increased tolerance of privacy risks in the Internet activity of adults with intellectual disabilities. Excessive caution about such risks denies those individuals not only the great benefits of Internet use but also the difficult but valuable experiences of loss, disappointment, and hurt associated with those risks. A level of risk-aversion appropriate for small children will be disrespectful for adults with intellectual disabilities. To the extent that additional safeguards are justified, they are better achieved through individualized security (...)
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  40. When Caring Is Just and Justice is Caring: Justice and Mental Retardation.Eva Feder Kittay - 2001 - Public Culture 13 (3):557-580.
    Among the various human forms alluded to in the Hebrew prayer, mental retardation appears to be one of the most difficult to celebrate. It is the disability that other disabled persons do not want attributed to them. It is the disability for which prospective parents are most likely to use selective abortion (Wertz 2000). And it is the disability that prompted one of the most illustrious United States Supreme Court Justices to endorse forced sterilization, because "three generations of imbeciles are (...)
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  41. Renewing Medicine’s Basic Concepts: On Ambiguity.Joel Michael Reynolds - 2018 - Philosophy, Ethics, and Humanities in Medicine 13 (1):8.
    In this paper, I argue that the concept of normality in medical research and clinical practice is inextricable from the concept of ambiguity. I make this argument in the context of Edmund Pellegrino's call for a renewed reflection on medicine’s basic concepts and by drawing on work in critical disability studies concerning Deafness and body integrity identity disorder. If medical practitioners and philosophers of medicine wish to improve their understanding of the meaning of medicine as well as its concrete practice, (...)
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  42. Disability, Disease, and Health Sufficiency.Sean Aas - 2016 - In Carina Fourie & Annette Rid (eds.), What is Enough?: Sufficiency, Justice, and Health. Oxford: Oxford University Press.
    This chapter argues that standard accounts of health are ill-suited to constructing a plausible theory of health justice, particularly a sufficientarian theory. The problem in these accounts is revealed by their treatment of disability. Theorists of health justice need to define “health” more narrowly to capture the legitimate claims of people with disabilities. Following Ronald Amundson and Peter Hucklenbroich, this chapter proposes such a definition. Health, as defined in this chapter, is the absence of conditions that directly cause, or threaten (...)
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  43. Discrimination and Disability.Sean Aas & David Wasserman - 2017 - In Kasper Lippert-Rasmussen (ed.), Routledge Handbook of the Ethics of Discrimination. New York: Routledge.
  44. Interdependency: The Fourth Existential Insult to Humanity.Tom Malleson - 2018 - Contemporary Political Theory 17 (2):160-186.
    Sigmund Freud famously described three existential insults to humanity stemming from heliocentrism, evolution, and psychoanalysis. In recent years we are, perhaps, beginning to see the emergence of a fourth: interdependency. Over the last several centuries, Anglo-American culture has modelled itself on a vision of the independent individual – strong, autonomous, and self-sufficient. Yet from feminist theory, communitarianism, disability theory, institutionalist economics, and elsewhere, the evidence mounts that independence is, in most contexts, a myth. We are, in fact, fundamentally social beings: (...)
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  45. Mental Illness Stigma and Epistemic Credibility in Advance.Abigail Gosselin - forthcoming - Social Philosophy Today.
  46. Persons with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities and Information Technologies. Some Ethical Observations—A Comment on Chalgoumi Et Al.Fiachra O’Brolcháin & Bert Gordijn - 2019 - Ethics and Behavior 29 (3):218-222.
    This comment on Chalgoumi et al.’s article “Information Privacy for Technology Users with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities: Why Does It Matter?” focuses on the concept of autonomy in order to expand the scope of the ethical discussion. First we explore the conceptual and practical relations between privacy and autonomy. Following this, we address the issue of underfunding of information technology for persons with intellectual and developmental disabilities in terms of distributive justice and provide some potential policy solutions.
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  47. Special Supplement: The Disability Rights Critique of Prenatal Genetic Testing Reflections and Recommendations.Erik Parens & Adrienne Asch - 1999 - Hastings Center Report 29 (5):S1.
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  48. Women and Disability. [REVIEW]Robin Tolmach Lakoff - 1989 - Feminist Studies 15 (2):365.
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  49. At Law: International Human Rights Law and Mental Disability.Lawrence O. Gostin - 2004 - Hastings Center Report 34 (2):11.
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  50. Book ReviewsMartha C Nussbaum,. Frontiers of Justice: Disability, Nationality, Species Membership.Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, Belknap Press, 2006. Pp. 487. $35.00 ; $18.95. [REVIEW]Margaret Urban Walker - 2008 - Ethics 118 (4):742-746.
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