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  1. Natural and Social Inequality.Sean Aas & David Wasserman - 2016 - Journal of Moral Philosophy 13 (5).
    _ Source: _Page Count 26 This paper examines the moral import of a distinction between natural and social inequalities. Following Thomas Nagel, it argues for a “denatured” distinction that relies less on the biological vs. social causation of inequalities than on the idea that society is morally responsible for some inequalities but not others. It maintains that securing fair equality of opportunity by eliminating such social inequalities has particularly high priority in distributive justice. Departing from Nagel, it argues that society (...)
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  2. Disability Life Writing and the Problem of Dependency in The Autobiography of Gaby Brimmer.Rachel Adams - 2017 - Journal of Medical Humanities 38 (1):39-50.
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  3. Reflections on the Function of Dignity in the Context of Caring for Old People.George J. Agich - 2007 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (5):483 – 494.
    This article accepts the proposition that old people want to be treated with dignity and that statements about dignity point to ethical duties that, if not independent of rights, at least enhance rights in ethically important ways. In contexts of policy and law, dignity can certainly have a substantive as well as rhetorical function. However, the article questions whether the concept of dignity can provide practical guidance for choosing among alternative approaches to the care of old people. The article explores (...)
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  4. Who Has the Capacity to Participate as a Rearee in a Person-Rearing Relationship?Agnieszka Jaworska & Julie Tannenbaum - 2015 - Ethics 125 (4):1096-1113.
    We discuss applications of our account of moral status grounded in person-rearing relationships: which individuals have higher moral status or not, and why? We cover three classes of cases: (1) cases involving incomplete realization of the capacity to care, including whether infants or fetuses have this incomplete capacity; (2) cases in which higher moral status rests in part on what is required for the being to flourish; (3) hypothetical cases in which cognitive enhancements could, e.g., help dogs achieve human-like cognitive (...)
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  5. Disability & ADA: Disparate Insurance Coverage for Physical and Psychological Disabilities Does Not Violate ADA.Nicklas A. Akers - 2000 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 28 (1):92-94.
  6. American Sign Language and End-of-Life Care: Research in the Deaf Community. [REVIEW]Barbara Allen, Nancy Meyers, John Sullivan & Melissa Sullivan - 2002 - HEC Forum 14 (3):197-208.
    We describe how a Community-Based Participatory Research (CBPR) process was used to develop a means of discussing end-of-life care needs of Deaf seniors. This process identified a variety of communication issues to be addressed in working with this special population. We overview the unique linguistic and cultural characteristics of this community and their implications for working with Deaf individuals to provide information for making informed decisions about end-of-life care, including completion of health care directives. Our research and our work with (...)
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  7. Disability, Functional Diversity, and Trans/Feminism.Ben Almassi - 2010 - International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics 3 (2):126-149.
    Feminist approaches to bioethics have the striking ability to usefully disrupt conversations otherwise in danger of calcifying into immovable opposing camps. Take, for instance, debates between theorists in disability studies and bioethicists who often take two different approaches to understanding disability. On one side are those such as Buchanan, Brock, Daniels, and Wikler (2000) who seek to locate the apparent functional deficiency of disability in biologically abnormal bodies. Let us call this a normal functioning approach to understanding disability. On the (...)
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  8. Some Cultural and Moral Implications of Inclusive Education in India—a Personal View.Mithu Alur - 2001 - Journal of Moral Education 30 (3):287-292.
    This article provides a personal viewpoint on and outline of the author's contribution to learning disability in India. It refers to her doctoral research on policy and the status of people with disability in India. It puts forth the view that although India addresses diversity in many ways it tends to exclude people with disability from national programmes. It argues that inclusive education should be context- and culture-specific and that inclusive programmes can develop, albeit incrementally, despite the fact that systemic (...)
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  9. Quality of Life, Disability, and Hedonic Psychology.Ron Amundson - 2010 - Journal for the Theory of Social Behaviour 40 (4):374-392.
  10. Disability, Handicap, and the Environment.Ron Amundson - 1992 - Journal of Social Philosophy 23 (1):105-119.
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  11. Bioethics and Disability Rights: Conflicting Values and Perspectives. [REVIEW]Ron Amundson & Shari Tresky - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):111-123.
    Continuing tensions exist between mainstream bioethics and advocates of the disability rights movement. This paper explores some of the grounds for those tensions as exemplified in From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice by Allen Buchanan and coauthors, a book by four prominent bioethicists that is critical of the disability rights movement. One set of factors involves the nature of disability and impairment. A second set involves presumptions regarding social values, including the importance of intelligence in relation to other human (...)
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  12. On a Bioethical Challenge to Disability Rights.Ron Amundson & Shari Tresky - 2007 - Journal of Medicine and Philosophy 32 (6):541 – 561.
    Tensions exist between the disability rights movement and the work of many bioethicists. These reveal themselves in a major recent book on bioethics and genetics, From Chance to Choice: Genetics and Justice. This book defends certain genetic policies against criticisms from disability rights advocates, in part by arguing that it is possible to accept both the genetic policies and the rights of people with impairments. However, a close reading of the book reveals a series of direct moral criticisms of the (...)
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  13. The Philosophy of Autism.L. Anderson Jami & Cushing Simon (eds.) - 2012 - Rowman & Littlefield.
    The Philosophy of Autism examines autism from the tradition of analytic philosophy, working from the premise that so-called autism spectrum disorders raise interesting philosophical questions that need to be and can be addressed in a manner that is clear, jargon-free, and accessible. The goal of the original essays in this book is to provide a philosophically rich analysis of issues raised by autism and to afford dignity and respect to those living with autism by placing it at the center of (...)
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  14. Discipline and Punishment in Light of Autism.Jami L. Anderson - 2014 - In Selina Doran & Laura Botell (eds.), Reframing Punishment: Making Visible Bodies, Silence and De-humanisation.
    If one can judge a society by how it treats its prisoners, one can surely judge a society by how it treats cognitively- and learning-impaired children. In the United States children with physical and cognitive impairments are subjected to higher rates of corporal punishment than are non-disabled children. Children with disabilities make up just over 13% of the student population in the U.S. yet make up over 18% of those children who receive corporal punishment. Autistic children are among the most (...)
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  15. A Dash of Autism.Jami L. Anderson - 2013 - In Jami L. Anderson Simon Cushing (ed.), The Philosophy of Autism. Rowman & Littlefield.
    In this chapter, I describe my “post-diagnosis” experiences as the parent of an autistic child, those years in which I tried, but failed, to make sense of the overwhelming and often nonsensical information I received about autism. I argue that immediately after being given an autism diagnosis, parents are pressured into making what amounts to a life-long commitment to a therapy program that (they are told) will not only dramatically change their child, but their family’s financial situation and even their (...)
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  16. Comprehending the Distinctively Sexual Nature of the Conduct.Jami L. Anderson - 2010 - Sex, Drugs and Rock and Roll.
    Since the 1970s, sexual assault laws have evolved to include prohibitions of sexual acts with cognitively impaired individuals. The argument justifying this prohibition is typically as follows: A sex act that is forced (without the legally valid consent of) someone is sexual assault. Cognitively impaired individuals, because they lack certain intellectual abilities, cannot give legally valid consent. Therefore, cognitively impaired individuals cannot consent to sex. Therefore, sex acts with cognitively impaired individuals is sexual assault. The prohibition of sex with such (...)
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  17. What to Tell and How to Tell: A Qualitative Study of Information Sharing in Research for Adults with Intellectual Disability.D. Andre-Barron, A. Strydom & A. Hassiotis - 2008 - Journal of Medical Ethics 34 (6):501-506.
    Objectives: To explore opinions and attitudes regarding the current information-giving practices in research involving adults with intellectual disabilities.Design: Qualitative focus group study with a purposive sample.Setting: An intellectual disabilities service within the NHSParticipants: A sample of 26 individuals including adults with mild intellectual disability, carers, clinicians, care managers and the charitable sector.Results: Three main themes were identified: process, format, and content. There was agreement that there is a need for improvement in the process and quality of information giving. With regard (...)
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  18. Rehabilitating Human Nature.Chrisoula Andreou - 2010 - Bioethics 24 (9):461-469.
    I review the main models of disability and introduce a line of reasoning that has been neglected in the debate concerning disability and disadvantage. My reasoning suggests that while disablism can and should be combated, success will require more challenging transformations than those featured in the literature.
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  19. Are Attempts to Have Impaired Children Justifiable?K. W. Anstey - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (5):286-288.
    Couples should not be allowed to select either for or against deafnessRecently, a US couple deliberately attempted to ensure the birth of a deaf child via artificial insemination.1 In opposing this action, I wish to focus on one argument they employ to support it, namely that in trying to have a deaf child, the women see themselves as no different from parents trying to have a girl. Girls can be discriminated against the same as deaf people and “black people have (...)
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  20. Growth Attenuation: To the Editor:To the Editor:To the Editor:To the Editor:Benjamin S. Wilfond Replies Health Outcomes and Social Services.Armand H. Matheny Antommaria - 2011 - Hastings Center Report 41 (5).
    To the Editor: In the November–December 2010 issue, the Seattle Growth Attenuation and Ethics Working Group (“Navigating Growth Attenuation in Children with Profound Disabilities”) analyzed the arguments for and against growth attenuation in children with permanent, profound intellectual disabilities and identified conditions under which its use may be ethically acceptable. The working group’s conclusion is based on a particular construction of the issue that is not always justified. It focuses on the possibility that growth attenuation will increase children’s involvement in (...)
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  21. Sex Rights for the Disabled?Jacob M. Appel - 2010 - Journal of Medical Ethics 36 (3):152-154.
    The public discourse surrounding sex and severe disability over the past 40 years has largely focused on protecting vulnerable populations from abuse. However, health professionals and activists are increasingly recognising the inherent sexuality of disabled persons and attempting to find ways to accommodate their intimacy needs. This essay explores several ethical issues arising from such efforts.
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  22. Neonatal Euthanasia: Why Require Parental Consent? [REVIEW]Jacob M. Appel - 2009 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 6 (4):477-482.
    The Dutch rules governing neonatal euthanasia, known as the Groningen Protocol, require parental consent for severely disabled infants with poor prognoses to have their lives terminated. This paper questions whether parental consent should be dispositive in such cases, and argues that the potential suffering of the neonate or pediatric patient should be the decisive factor under such unfortunate circumstances.
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  23. Disability, Priority, and Social Justice.Richard Arneson - manuscript
    Richard J. Arneson version 7/27/99 Is having a disability more like being a member of a racially stigmatized group or like lacking a talent? Both analogies might be apt. The Americans with Disabilities Act stresses the former analogy. The framing thought is that people with disabilities are objects of prejudice and prejudiced behaviors which wrongfully exclude them from participation in important social practices such as the labor market. Think for example of a blind person whose job applications are always automatically (...)
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  24. Distracted by Disability.Adrienne Asch - 1998 - Cambridge Quarterly of Healthcare Ethics 7 (1):77-87.
    People with disabilities use more medical care and see health professionals more often than do those of the same age, ethnic group, or economic class who do not have impairments. An indisputable medical goal is.
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  25. Criticizing and Reforming Segregated Facilities for Persons with Disabilities.Adrienne Asch, Jeffrey Blustein & David T. Wasserman - 2008 - Journal of Bioethical Inquiry 5 (2/3):157-168.
    In this paper, we critically appraise institutions for people with disabilities, from residential facilities to outpatient clinics to social organizations. While recognizing that a just and inclusive society would reject virtually all segregated institutional arrangements, we argue that in contemporary American society, some people with disabilities may have needs that at this time can best be met by institutional arrangements. We propose ways of reforming institutions to make them less isolating, coercive, and stigmatizing, and to provide forms of social support (...)
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  26. 'Healthy' Human Embryos and Reproduction Making Embryos Healthy or Making Healthy Embryos: How Much of a Difference Between Prenatal Treatment and Selection?Adrienne Asch & David Wasserman - 2010 - In The 'Healthy' Embryo: Social, Biomedical, Legal and Philosophical Perspectives. pp. 201-18.
  27. Children and Added Sugar: The Case for Restriction.Theodore Bach - 2016 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 32 (4).
    It is increasingly clear that children's excessive consumption of products high in added sugar causes obesity and obesity-related health problems like type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and metabolic syndrome. Less clear is how best to address this problem through public health policy. In contrast to policies that might conflict with adult's right to self-determination — for example sugar taxes and soda bans — this article proposes that children's access to products high in added sugars should be restricted in the same (...)
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  28. End-of-Life Care for Children and Adults with Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities.Christopher F. Barber - 2012 - Nursing Philosophy 13 (1):78-79.
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  29. Justice and Disability: What Kind of Theorizing Is Needed?Linda Barclay - 2011 - Journal of Social Philosophy 42 (3):273-287.
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  30. Disability, Respect and Justice.Linda Barclay - 2010 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (2):154-171.
    Recent political philosophers have argued that criteria of social justice that defend distributing resources to individuals on the basis of the disadvantages of their natural endowments are disrespectful and disparaging. Clearly influenced by the social model of disability, Elizabeth Anderson and Thomas Pogge have recently defended criteria of social justice that distribute resources to people with disabilities on the basis of eliminating discrimination, not making up for so-called natural disadvantage. I argue that it is implausible to suggest that just entitlements (...)
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  31. Ethical Fairness and Human Rights: The Treatment of Employees with Psychiatric Disabilities.Lizabeth A. Barclay & Karen S. Markel - 2009 - Journal of Business Ethics 85 (3):333-345.
    Extant business research has not addressed the ethical treatment of individuals with psychiatric disabilities. This article will describe previous research on individuals with psychiatric disabilities drawn from rehabilitation, psychological, managerial, legal, as well as related business ethics writings before presenting a framework that illustrates the dynamics of (un)ethical behavior in relation to the employment of such individuals. Individuals with psychiatric disabilities often evoke negative reactions from those in their environment. Lastly, we provide recommendations for how employees and organizations can become (...)
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  32. Direct Payments and Their Future: An Ethical Concern?Colin Barnes - 2007 - Ethics and Social Welfare 1 (3):348-354.
    Recent policy developments in the general area of disability have presented a whole range of ethical dilemmas for everyone involved in the development and delivery of services for disabled people at the national and local levels. This is almost certainly due to government acceptance of the principles of independent living and the social model of disability, and greater user involvement and control of support services, in particular ?direct payments?. This paper will centre on the ethical concerns that arise from recent (...)
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  33. The Minority Body: A Theory of Disability.Elizabeth Barnes - 2016 - Oxford University Press.
    Disability is primarily a social phenomenon -- a way of being a minority, a way of facing social oppression, but not a way of being inherently or intrinsically worse off. This is how disability is understood in the Disability Rights and Disability Pride movements; but there is a massive disconnect with the way disability is typically viewed within analytic philosophy. The idea that disability is not inherently bad or sub-optimal is one that many philosophers treat with open skepticism, and sometimes (...)
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  34. Reciprocity, Justice, and Disability.Lawrence C. Becker - 2005 - Ethics 116 (1):9-39.
  35. Rawls and Research on Cognitively Impaired Patients: A Reply to Maio.Derek R. Bell - 2003 - Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 24 (5):381-393.
    In his paper, “The Relevance of Rawls’ Principle of Justice for Research on Cognitively Impaired Patients” (Theoretical Medicine and Bioethics 23 (2002):45–53), Giovanni Maio has developed a thought-provoking argument for the permissibility of non-therapeutic research on cognitively impaired patients. Maio argues that his conclusion follows from the acceptance of John Rawls’s principles of justice, specifically, Rawls’s “liberty principle” Maio has misinterpreted Rawls’s “libertyprinciple” – correctly interpreted it does notsupport non-therapeutic research on cognitivelyimpaired patients. Three other ‘Rawlsian’ arguments are suggested by (...)
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  36. Review of Prenatal Testing and Disability Rights, Edited by Erik Parens and Adrienne Asch. Georgetown University Press, 2000, Pound46.75 (Hb), Pound17.25 (Sb), Pp 371. ISBN 0-87840-804-. [REVIEW]A. C. Berry - 2002 - Journal of Medical Ethics 28 (2):130-a-130.
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  37. Disability, “Being Unhealthy,” and Rights to Health.Jerome Bickenbach - 2013 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 41 (4):821-828.
    Often advocates for persons with disabilities strongly object to the claim that disability essentially involves a decrement in health. Yet, it is a mystery why anyone with an impairment would ever deny, or feel uncomfortable being told that, their impairment is at bottom a health problem. In this paper, I investigate the conceptual linkages between health and disability, relying on robust conceptualizations of both notions, and conclude it makes no conceptual sense to insist that a person can be seriously impaired (...)
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  38. Does Cost Effectiveness Analysis Unfairly Discriminate Against People with Disabilities?Greg Bognar - 2010 - Journal of Applied Philosophy 27 (4):394-408.
    Cost effectiveness analysis is a tool for evaluating the aggregate benefits of medical treatments, health care services, and public health programs. Its opponents often claim that its use leads to unfair discrimination against people with disabilities. My aim in this paper is to clarify the conditions under which this might be so. I present some ways in which the use of cost effectiveness analysis can lead to discrimination and suggest why these forms of discrimination may be unfair. I also discuss (...)
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  39. Should a Personality Disorder Qualify as a Mental Disease in Insanity Adjudication?Richard J. Bonnie - 2010 - Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics 38 (4):760-763.
    The determinative issue in applying the insanity defense is whether the defendant experienced a legally relevant functional impairment at the time of the offense. Categorical exclusion of personality disorders from the definition of mental disease is clinically and morally arbitrary because it may lead to unfair conviction of a defendant with a personality disorder who actually experienced severe, legally relevant impairments at the time of the crime. There is no need to consider such a drastic approach in most states and (...)
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  40. When Worlds Collide: Disability Rights and Medical Prerogatives in Matters of Life and Death. [REVIEW]James Bopp & Daniel Avila - 1995 - HEC Forum 7 (2-3):132-149.
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  41. Disability, Enhancement and the Harm -Benefit Continuum.Lisa Bortolotti & John Harris - 2006 - In John R. Spencer & Antje Du Bois-Pedain (eds.), Freedom and Responsibility in Reproductive Choice. Hart Publishers.
    Suppose that you are soon to be a parent and you learn that there are some simple measures that you can take to make sure that your child will be healthy. In particular, suppose that by following the doctor’s advice, you can prevent your child from having a disability, you can make your child immune from a number of dangerous diseases and you can even enhance its future intelligence. All that is required for this to happen is that you (or (...)
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  42. Ethical Challenges in the Treatment of Individuals With Intellectual Disabilities.Sara E. Boyd & Zachary W. Adams - 2010 - Ethics and Behavior 20 (6):407-418.
  43. CanThere Be a Disability Studies Theory of "End-of-Life Autonomy"?Harold Braswell - 2011 - The Disability Studies Quarterly 31 (4):online.
  44. Protecting the Vulnerable: Autonomy and Consent in Health Care.Margaret Brazier & Mary Lobjoit (eds.) - 1991 - Routledge.
    Protecting the Vulnerable explores the reality of patient control and choice in health care and analyzes how decisions should be made on behalf of those deemed incapable of making decisions. The contributors, distinguished experts from the disciplines of medicine, ethics, theology, and law, look at the complex problem of autonomy and consent in health care and clinical research today from an illuminating perspective--its impact on the vulnerable members of society. The essays move from the exploration of lingering paternalism in health (...)
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  45. When the Home Becomes a Prison: Living with a Severely Disabled Child.B. S. Brinchmann - 1999 - Nursing Ethics 6 (2):137-143.
    The aim of this study was to generate knowledge about how parents who have been part of an ethical decision-making process concerning a son or daughter in a neonatal unit experience life with a severely disabled child. A descriptive study design was chosen using 30 hours of field observations and seven in-depth interviews, carried out over a period of five months with parents who had been faced with ethical decisions concerning their own children in a neonatal unit. Strauss and Glaser’s (...)
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  46. Health Care Resource Prioritization and Discrimination Against Persons with Disabilities.Dan W. Brock - unknown
    In 1990 the landmark Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) became federal law with the express purpose to “establish a clear and comprehensive national mandate for the elimination of discrimination against individuals with disabilities."l The act includes separate titles prohibiting discrimination on the basis of disability in employment, public services, transportation and public accommodations. Since it prohibits discrimination on the basis of disability in both public and private services and programs, in health care “it applies to programs provided by the government, (...)
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  47. Cost-Effectiveness and Disability Discrimination.Dan W. Brock - 2009 - Economics and Philosophy 25 (1):27-47.
    It is widely recognized that prioritizing health care resources by their relative cost-effectiveness can result in lower priority for the treatment of disabled persons than otherwise similar non-disabled persons. I distinguish six different ways in which this discrimination against the disabled can occur. I then spell out and evaluate the following moral objections to this discrimination, most of which capture an aspect of its unethical character: it implies that disabled persons' lives are of lesser value than those of non-disabled persons; (...)
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  48. The Non-Identity Problem and Genetic Harms – the Case of Wrongful Handicaps.Dan W. Brock - 1995 - Bioethics 9 (3):269–275.
    The Human Genome Project will produce information permitting increasing opportunities to prevent genetically transmitted harms, most of which will be compatible with a life worth living, through avoiding conception or terminating a pregnancy. Failure to prevent these harms when it is possible for parents to do so without substantial burdens or costs to themselves or others are what J call “wrongful handicaps”. Derek Parfit has developed a systematic difficulty for any such cases being wrongs — when the harm could be (...)
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  49. Disability and Disadvantage.Kimberley Brownlee & Adam Cureton (eds.) - 2009 - Oxford University Press.
    Introduction ADAM CURETON AND KIMBERLEY BROWNLEE Disability and disadvantage are interrelated topics that raise important and sometimes overlooked issues in ...
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  50. Care of the Handicapped Newborn: Parental Responsibility and Medical Responsibility.M. J. Brueton - 1988 - Journal of Medical Ethics 14 (1):48-49.
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